The Fresh Loaf

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Using a non-rye starter with rye

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Boleigh's picture
Boleigh

Using a non-rye starter with rye

Hello all you lovely baking folk...

I have a question about starters which you may be able to help with. I have a very successful starter going now for about six months - Suzy. She is very versatile and seems to adapt to many different blends, temperatures etc. very well. She makes great bread and I look after her in turn very well - always feeding her with the best organic flour - well ususally!

I wondered if you need to develop a new rye starter to make rye sourdough? Obviously I will try Suzy out, but just wondered what the common wisdom was?

 

David 

isand66's picture
isand66

I take some of my white starter and make a separate rye starter out of it while still keeping my white starter for my other bakes.  You want to build it up over at least 3 builds.  When the starter is ready, if you want you can keep it as a separate starter for the future or just repeat when you want to bake rye breads.

Boleigh's picture
Boleigh

Ok, I like this idea - I haven't thought of building up the starter for a specific flour. I basically bake every day and use the starter all the time. Thank you I will give it a go. 

Fred Rickson's picture
Fred Rickson

It should't make any difference in taste.  I use a non-rye starter and bake rye bread about 90% of the time.  My mix is 80% rye so the final flavor is strong.  The dilution effect of your starter is small so I doubt you will taste any difference.

isand66's picture
isand66

I've done it both ways.  Most of the formulas I use have a large portion of rye flour in the starter and usually if I just add rye flour in 1 build to my AP seed it doesn't react very well and refuses to rise like a spoiled child so I usually do 2 -3 builds.  You are right though, if the final dough only uses a small amount of starter then it probably won't effect the taste profile very much.

Boleigh's picture
Boleigh

Two or three builds it is. I'm going to give it a try this week. 

Boleigh's picture
Boleigh

cool, thank you. That's good to know. I hadn't thought about taste. 80% is a lot. Do you use white flour for the rest?

Fred Rickson's picture
Fred Rickson

Nope, just whole wheat for the other 20%.  Four day or so build, lots of flavor and lots of acid.  Not so much rise.  This is a thin sliced bread...not a sandwich loaf...but a slice under some home-made smoked pork belly bacon, soft-boiled egg, and some parm grated on top is a killer brunch.  Actually, with the strong rye, it is a killer anytime. 

 

Enjoy.

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

I use 100% whole grains freshly milled when I bake.  I bake daily.  My starter is wheat with a bit of Kamut, spelt and rye added.  When I plan a bake for a recipe that uses a rye sour I simply use my ww starter and feed it a bit of rye flour the night before I begin my daily builds (2 builds throughout the day to get to the amt. of leaven I need for my loaf).  

I used to keep a rye starter but found it to be too much work and I didn't use it enough to justify the extra effort or flour wasted in keeping it fed and happy.  My above method has served me well and my starter adapts rather quickly which I attribute to the whole grains I use.  It switches right back to ww after a few feeds too.  I think it likes the rye every once in awhile :-)

Janet

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I keep one starter.  Right now it is a multi-grain one with rye, WW, spelt and Kamut like Janet's.  If I'm baking white bread, I take 10 g or starter (I only keep 80 g in the fridge at most) and build it to what ever levain amount  needed over 1-3 builds using AP flour.  If it was a W bread I would build it with WW.  It is so much easier having one starter for everything.  No muss no fuss!