The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

No Knead Kaiser Rolls

  • Pin It
taurus430's picture
taurus430

No Knead Kaiser Rolls

I've baked Kaiser rolls in the past using the formula from here and they came out pretty good. I also do a lot of no knead bread, roll and pizza baking. Last week I wanted to use the no knead method and adapt it to a Kaiser Roll recipe. Well I must say it worked.  I also made the rolls using the knot method to form them, which is easier for me. I would have taken pics but they're all gone, LOL. If anyone is interested, I will be glad to post the recipe I used and when I make them again, will take pics.  I really like making my dough one day and baking the next. Plus the breads have a better flavor with the overnight ferment.

linder's picture
linder

Oh, yes, please post your recipe and method.  I've been thinking about Kaiser rolls recently.  I haven't had a really good one since I left the US East Coast. 

Thanks

Linda

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

of the late Norm Berg shaping Kaiser rolls the traditional way Linda.  Amazing ! I'm sure could find it by searching.

linder's picture
linder

I agree, DA, it is an amazing video.  He was very adept at shaping these rolls - 200 in an hour? or something crazy like that.

Linda

decatur's picture
decatur

I would love the recipe!  My husband, a New Yorker, was craving these just last week.  Thanks.

wizarddrummer's picture
wizarddrummer

Where is the recipe? Did I miss it?

taurus430's picture
taurus430

Here is what I did to make these rolls. Remember though, I've baked Kaiser rolls before with instructions from here and the bread book "Inside the Jewish Bakery" which is an excellent book. I also do a lot of no knead baking so I tried to combine both and I liked the results. I only did this once as an experiment so try it.

No Knead Kaiser Rolls          Makes about 8---4oz rolls 

Dough:

3 ¼  cups Bread Flour

2 ¼  tsp Instant Yeast

1 ½ tbsp Granulated Sugar
1 ½ tsp of Salt
1 ¼  cup water warmed to 110 deg

1 ½  tbsp oil

1 ½ tbsp beaten egg

1 tsp dry or liquid malt syrup (can replace with 1tsp extra sugar)

Poppy seeds and milk or egg white for washing

Cornmeal for dusting pans 

Instructions:

Combine the flour, salt, yeast, sugar and mix ingredients together in a large 5 qt container or a large 5qt stand mixer bowl. Add water, oil and beaten egg and using the mixing tool begin to mix. 

Transfer dough to large (5 quart) bowl if using a mixer or lidded food container. Cover (not airtight), and allow to rest at room temperature until dough rises and collapses (or flattens on top), approximately 2 hours. I put mine in the oven with the light on. Remove and refrigerate overnight. 

The next day remove it from the container and with floured hands roll the dough into a boule (ball): Gently stretch the surface of the dough around to the bottom on four “sides,” rotating the ball a quarter-turn as  you go. Allow to rest about 40 minutes.

 To shape the rolls, divide the dough into 8 smaller pieces, 3 ½ to 4 0z  each. Use additional flour to work as Kaiser roll dough is normally a stiff dough.

To shape them, either use a Kaiser roll stamp or by knotting them. You can try the fold method as described on here, but I found that tedious. I used the knotting method to shape them.

Place them on a sheet pan with parchment paper covered with corn meal and flatten them . Let rise for 1 hour.

Preheat the oven to 425º  during the final rise You want to have steam in the oven when you bake them, so use whatever technique you prefer: squirting them with water, squirting the oven sides with water, pouring boiling water in a preheated cast-iron pan or a cookie sheet.

Finally wash them with milk or spray with water and sprinkle with poppy seeds.

Bake for 10 mins at 425º then lower oven to 400º

These rolls take around 20 to 25 minutes to bake. You may rotate the pan once 10 minutes into it so they'll brown evenly.

Give it a try and let me know how it works for you. As I mentioned, this was an experiment that worked for me, but I've been working with both no knead methods for over 4 years plus recipes from the book mentioned above including onion rolls. These are way better then store bought rolls!