The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

dough sheeter for home use?

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jooney's picture
jooney

dough sheeter for home use?

Hi,

I've been making croissants for some time and I've realized that the key to making great croissants is perfect lamination.  With mediocre lamination, you can never come close to store-bought ones.  So I began searching for a dough sheeter for home use, but there wasn't really such thing.  Two days ago, I came across a website that sells slab rollers, which I thought could work as a substitute for dough sheeters.  I sent them an email enquiry regarding its possible use as a dough sheeter.  The answer that came back was negative.  They said, "We cannot recommend any of our products for food use."   I was really disappointed to hear that.   Has anybody ever used a slab roller in place of a dough sheeter?  Its basic function is pretty much identical, I think.  I don't see why they can't be used as dough sheeters.  Any comments would be appreciated.  

 

 

cranbo's picture
cranbo

Someone else posted about this recently on TFL.

How about a pasta machine? Not wide enough, and/or not enough thickness settings?

jooney's picture
jooney

Thanks.  I'm not sure whether a pasta maker would get the job done.   As far as I know, the thickest setting is 2.5 mm, which is a little "thin" for croissant dough.(It might be OK for the final sheeting, but when you do the folds, you sheet it out to 5-6mm thickness.)

 

 

cranbo's picture
cranbo
Faith in Virginia's picture
Faith in Virginia
jooney's picture
jooney

Thanks for the link, but buiding a manual sheeter like that seems a daunting task to me.ㅠㅠ

 

jooney's picture
jooney

It would have been nice if the thickness setting had been specified.  Thanks for the reply. 

gary.turner's picture
gary.turner

they can't "recommend" their product for food. There are too many laws and regulations, not to mention officious bureaucrats, to satisfy before selling something for use with food. Look for yourself at the materials used and at the possibilities for contamination by machine lubricants. If you're satisfied you won't wipe out the neighborhood with toxic vapors coming from your croissants, consider giving it a try. The slab rollers I've seen use a stiff plastic to wrap the clay. I see no reason that wouldn't fix the dough sticking to the rollers problem and further separate the dough from the machinery.

Naturally, YMMV.

gary

jooney's picture
jooney

Thanks for your answer, Gary.  I apprecaite it.  

lazybaker's picture
lazybaker

I wonder if having two  1/4" thick wooden dowel sticks at a home improvement store and a long rolling pin would work.

You lay the 1/4" thick wooden sticks beside the dough and then roll the rolling pin on top of the sticks, so that you get 1/4" thick dough every time. I've seen this done at a bakery store where they were rolling cookie dough to get 1/4" thick dough.

 

jooney's picture
jooney

Hi lazybaker,

You mean something like this?

I just decided to give adjustable rolling pins a go.  

http://www.amazon.com/Joseph-Adjustable-Rolling-16-5-Inch-Multi-Color/dp/B0091QO3RK/ref=sr_1_sc_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1359441412&sr=8-1-spell&keywords=adjusta...

 

 

 

 

lazybaker's picture
lazybaker

Yes, like that photo you posted.

Nice find on the adjustable rolling pin on amazon! That's even better since it doesn't use up space. Let us know if the rolling pin works.

MANNA's picture
MANNA

If anyone is interested. I had my friend who went to Paris for the holiday contact Caplain about their manual dough sheeter. The cost is 2,500.00 usd. Out of my range right now. I would like to finish building my home sheeter one day. I put my masonary oven higher on the priority list though. Guess I will keep rolling my croissants by had for now.