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Sourdough Crackers

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RonRay's picture
RonRay

Sourdough Crackers

Sourdough Crackers


Previous blog: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/22542/noknead-multigrain-seed-and-nut-loaf


I know that most of us, that culture wild yeast, seldom actually "discard" the discards of our sourdough. Of course, it is not unusual to hear someone new to keeping a sourdough culture remarking that they hate to have to through out the discards. And again, of course, a dozen replies of "No! Make pancakes..." or "Oh, no! Make waffles... ". Well, from now on, I will be crying "No! Make sourdough crackers.. The older the discards, the better the crackers!"


Naturally, that does assume you like sour sourdough, but the crackers are great even with "un-sour" sourdough discards, Rye Sour, etc. or even non-discarded levain as the leavening ingredient.


I came across a year old post by Sarah Wood on using your discard for whole wheat crackers. The link is:
http://www.kitchenstewardship.com/2010/03/08/sourdough-recipes-galore-whole-wheat-crackers/
It certainly looked simple enough, so I tried it. I am certainly glad I did, although, a batch never last very long and another few hundred calories have been ingested.


So, here is a step by step, complete with photos, Baker's percentages, some suggestions, and pointers on the ingredients and process. Even if you are not of an experimental curiosity by nature, I suspect you will have some ideas for variations you would like to try.



A small amount Sesame Oil, or Olive Oil to brush the top of the crackers and Kosher salt to sprinkle over the oiled surface will also be needed.


Substitutions of butter or lard can be made for the coconut oil, but I prefer the coconut oil, either the Extra Virgin, or the Expeller types.


Notice that I chose the ingredient amounts to exactly match the Baker's percentages. This batch size works very well for one sheet of crackers per Silpat baking sheet and a 100 grams of discards is an equally reasonable size. If you wish, make multiples of this amount and store in the fridge until you want more crackers.


I do want to mention some considerations to keep in mind when using coconut oil. Using the Extra Virgin Coconut Oil is my first choice, Expeller Coconut Oil is my second and neither one requires special consideration in a warmer kitchen, but if the kitchen temperature, or the dough temperature, is below about 78ºF ( 25.5º C) then you should either use methods to maintain the temperature of all ingredients about 78ºF ( 25.5º C) during the mixing phase, or use softened butter. Coconut oil is liquid from about the 75ºF ( 23.9º C) and above. Adding it in a mix of cold, fresh out of the fridge, levain may very well cause lumpy, difficult dough conditions. Once the full mixing is complete, this is no longer of any potential problem.











Let your finished crackers cool before placing (if any are uneaten) in an airtight container to preserve their crispness.


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   Next Blog:http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/22910/ingredient-list-and-calcultor-tfl-bakers


 


 



Comments

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi Ron,


These looks yummy! I'm going to try that :-). In fact I think I could probably do it with my regular stiff levain, which is on the bench all the time.


Thanks for posting in so much detail - that makes the process so much easier to follow. Loved the witty tags also!


Best wishes, Daisy_A

RonRay's picture
RonRay

Daisy, those described here come close to a "Wheat Thin" to my taste senses. It is such an easy process that all kinds of fun experiments come to mind. It even might make a reasonable first sample method for testing new flour, or seed types.


I baked those in the photos yesterday morning, and I was too intent on the photos to pay the attention I should have to the rolling out of the dough. But, I think that worked out better, as I was able to show what the lack of uniformity results in.


Even so, this morning, I ate the last of them. So, perhaps I'll bake a batch tomorrow, again. I have another 171g jar of dough in the fridge.


Let me know how your try works out, too, if you would.


Ron


 


 

wassisname's picture
wassisname

... for making me want to make crackers again.  You pulled me in wth the step by step.  I used to make crackers regularly, but I would invest loads of time and effort only to see them devoured by the end of the day (mostly by me, I'll admit).  This looks pretty simple and has sourdough, perfect! 


A pasta machine works great for getting uniform thickness, if you happen to have one, but also becomes part of the hassle.  I think I'll go back to working on my roller skills when I try these.


Thanks again!


Marcus

RonRay's picture
RonRay

and Thank you, Marcus, for the feedback, I certainly know what you mean by them being gone by the end of the day, and I am the only one here to eat them LOL


(º¿º)... Ron


 

wassisname's picture
wassisname

OK, so I didn't have the actual formula in front of me, but I followed the spirit of it.  A lump of very ripe WW sourdough, enough extra flour to make it not sticky, a little olive oil and salt, and bingo!  Crackers.  Or rather, one big cracker, because I forgot to cut it up before it went into the oven.  I already had something in the oven so I slid these in with it and kept a sharp eye on them.  Worked like a charm!  Light, crispy, and surprisingly flavorful considering how little went into them.  Thanks again for the inspiration.


Marcus

RonRay's picture
RonRay

Marcus,


I am very glad you had such a pleasing result. I made a batch, and as I let go of the tray on the oven stones I realized I had forgotten the salt. I made a fast recovery - fast enough that the tray hadn't even got burning hot yet, so all ended well here, also... LOL


(º¿º) ... Ron


 

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Ron,


Nice write up and a great way to use the dicard sour dough starter!  I will try it with my raisin yeast water levain :)   I have all the ingredients here  :)  


Best wishes,


Akiko

RonRay's picture
RonRay

Akiko, I am pleased to hear you plan to try them. I think you will enjoy them, too  ;-)


Ron

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi Ron,


Made the crackers with my normal starter - half plain white and half wholewheat at about 67% hydration plus rye flour with japanese Togarashi/Seven Spice seasoning on top - were delicious! 


Many thanks for sharing.


Pic below: Apologies if a bit dark - lighting was low in the kitchen and adjusting afterwards takes out detail. Hope it gives an idea!


Best wishes, Daisy_A


RonRay's picture
RonRay

Fun, tasty, quick, and easy


That is great, Daisy. How many thing that we bake can be said to have all four of the said about them - fun, tasty, quick, and easy - LOL


(º¿-) ... Ron


 

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hello,
Ron, thanks so much for this detailed post, and Daisy_A, thanks for the idea of a spice topping!
I made crackers recently using a buttermilk dough (Nancy Silverton - Pastries from La Brea Bakery), topped with kosher salt and freshly ground pepper, and seeds (chia, golden flax, white poppy, sesame).
Your sourdough and spice crackers sound wonderful. My husband is encouraging me daily to make crackers again :^) - I must try making yours!
Thanks, from breadsong


 


 

RonRay's picture
RonRay

There seems no end of the potential variations that one can come up with for this simple concept, which makes them even more fun.


Ron


 

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hello Ron, Had to try making these crackers of yours. The cracker dough mixed up really nicely with your formula!
I topped the crackers with sesame oil as you suggested, a light dusting of spice (salt, pepper, chili, a tiny bit of ginger & the teensiest pinch of sugar), & sesame seeds. Here's a couple of pictures, before and after baking:
 

The crackers are crisp & wheaty & I love the texture, and how they maintained their shape and remained flat during baking.
Thanks so much for this post!
from breadsong

RonRay's picture
RonRay

Breadsong, It is I who should thank you :-) That variation sounds great and the photos look as if you have made your husband a happy man LOL


Ron


 

breadsong's picture
breadsong

He loves these crackers...yes he was a happy camper!
from breadsong

RonRay's picture
RonRay

I love all these variations, that are being generated. With a bit of imagination, it seems one would never need to get tired of them ;-)
breadsong, Tell your husband, he is very welcome...


Ron


 

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi breadsong - crackers look delicious! Daisy_A

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Your crackers do too - those spices, and the rye!
Your rye variation is inspiring my current attempt to make a rye cracker (non-sourdough though).
(If the crackers turn out OK I'll post).
from breadsong

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Daisy,


They look very yummy!  I like the idea of using the Togarashi!! :)


Akiko

RonRay's picture
RonRay

I used Chia in my last batch, as well. I think I'll go with sesame on the next batch... It is terrible how fast they disappear. LOL
... Ron

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Hi, Ron


I made your crackers today :) That was a huge hit!  I don't have to buy crackers anymore.  I used my raisin yeast levain for this crackers, so they are not sour at all but nicely sweet.  Very crispy!! YUM!  However, I better modify my oven  because they are not evenly baked well. My oven is not so reliable.



This is the left over for tomorrow :) My daughter who is a picky eater really likes them. 


Thank you, Ron!

RonRay's picture
RonRay

Akiko, they do look good. One thing you could try, if uneven heat is the problem - and not uneven thickness of the dough - is to preheat to a higher temperature before putting the crackers into the oven, but to drop the heat 275ºF ( 135º C) or 300ºF ( 149º C) as soon as you put the crackers into the oven. That way any unevenness resulting from the heating elements themselves, rather than drafts, is greatly reduced. Of course, you then have to visually determine when the crackers are finished.


Ron


 

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Ron, Thank you for your advice!!  I will try that next  time!!  Thank you for your great cracker recipe, really!!


Akiko

RonRay's picture
RonRay

Akiko,


Please, let me know if that helps :-)


Ron

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi Akiko - crackers look lovely - they're so evenly shaped! Daisy_A

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi Ron, breadsong, Akiko, Marcus,


There seem to be some really great crackers being made in response to Ron's inspiring formula!


Loving the pictures of golden, tasty crackers!


Best wishes, Daisy_A

RonRay's picture
RonRay

Daisy, if you look at those images too often you may have a "cracker attack"... LOL


Ron

teketeke's picture
teketeke

I made your crackers again. This time, I changed the shape the dough into Sticks, and the rest of them are squares as usual.


I also added some dried cranberries and cherries that are gifts , and also put some white chocolate chips in the dough.


The stick shapes are crispier than the square ones which I like the most.



 


 


 


 I got the stick shape idea from Cookpad.  http://cookpad.com/recipe/254788   写真


Thank you, Ron!!


Akiko

RonRay's picture
RonRay

Akiko,


They look great !


I also made stick crackers the other day - Actually, I got the idea from something you mentioned in an earlier post. I thought mine came out great, too. I rolled out the dough, initially, the same as if for crackers, then added ground pepper, and sesame seeds and folded the top third down to center and followed with the bottom third up to cover the folded-down top half. I then cut the long dimension into thirds and stacked the 3, thirds on each other with some other spices rubbed in between the pieces. I then rolled the pile into the final sheet and sliced into sticks, oiled and salted, then baked. Yum...


Ron


 


 

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Hmmm.. It sounds luscious  I better try your way next time. Thank you sharing the great idea, Ron


Akiko

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Hi Ron


I made your crackers with chedder cheese that Txfarmer posted recently. I made some unique shapes :)


 


 I used a Lattice pie top cutter 12cm ( http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0011X5JT2  ) to cut the dough and again, cut vertically 2cm each.


  Are they unique? :P


 On the left: Twisted stickes were made by my daugher.


 Make a letter U ...


 and twisted like the picture.


I folded the chedder chess like making  croissants.  It was really fun to make those tasty crispy crackers with my daugter.


I am looking forward to seeing your next post!


Best wishes,


Akiko


 

RonRay's picture
RonRay

Akiko, you are a wonder - what a creative mind you have. I love the looks of these - both the twisted sticks and the "genetic strands".  Of course, I know they must have tasted great.


Thank you for the feedback, as well as the Lattice pie top cutter link !!!


Ron

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Your welcome, Ron.  I couldn't stop eating these crackers!!  so did my daughter and son. 


They are really good as you know the taste!! 


Akiko

RonRay's picture
RonRay

Akiko, they just do not last long enough. Last week, I made a 350g batch of them, and used txfarmers cheddar addition. I split the dough into two, 175g batches for the rolling out and made strips from one batch and crackers from the other. Now, I need to make more... LOL


Ron

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Hi Ron,


I made  " POCKY" today, but they gone so quickly ...I could only take a picture of one of them.  I proofed the sticks for 40 minutes because I had to help my husband to take care of our chickens LOL   They are not slim like the real pockies, however, they really stay crispy.   Next time, I will come here to post slim pockies!  I have to make another big portion of levain with raisin yeast water. :)



Cheers,


Akiko

RonRay's picture
RonRay

Akiko, I can understand why they do not last long :-)


Thanks for showing me what they look like. I had never heard of a "pocky" before.


Ron

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Hi Ron,


Japanese pockies are here:


http://www.google.com/search?q=pocky&hl=en&rlz=1T4ADFA_enUS370US371&prmd=ivns&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=Jtq9TZ2UEYHBtgfF7LHFBQ&ved=0CDQQsAQ&biw=1259&bih=681


I am too lazy to use rich text editor to hide the long website address...I learned it several years ago when I tried to make own blog. I gave up. LOL


Akiko

RonRay's picture
RonRay

I also found them on Amazon LOL


Ron

shokouhi.fatemeh's picture
shokouhi.fatemeh

hi mr Ron Ray.

 I have some guestion about the production of sourdough crackers. i want to produce it in industry,and i want to know that should it be provide Separately and then to be added to other ingredients?

could you please tell me about the amount of ingredients of sourdough and also the other stuff producing cracker? would you let me to know how much time is need to fermenteation in room temperature?7 to 8 hours is proper for it?is it necessary to be added flour and water at the same level during a week?

i wating for your answer,i having rush!!

tanks for your guidance.

RonRay's picture
RonRay

shokouhi.fatemeh, I have answered your PM, relating to these questions, already, so I will not repeat that answer here. Please check that Personal Message reply.

Good Luck,

Ron

teresakay's picture
teresakay

 

Warm Hello

i am new to this sourdough

however i am making bread right now

and i know how to get my starter ready for bread

how do i make crackers with my starter

i dont understand the chart

i see that it says to let rise for 8 hours overnight

but how much flour and how much starter?

do i mix and let stand overnight

i am so happy...i never wanted to throw out starter

i hope now i will always have crackers on hand too boot!

assuming the last in an air tight container and i only use them for a snack

verses a meal

RonRay's picture
RonRay

The 50 grams of "sourdough flour" and 50 grams of "sourdough water" are simply another way of saying "use 100 grams of 100% HL Sourdough starter".

So, if your starter is maintained by feeding it equal amounts (by weight) of flour and water, then you have 100% HL (hydration level) starter. In this case, you would then mix the 100 gm. of SD starter to an additional 50 gm. of Whole Wheat Flour, 20 gm. of Coconut oil and 0.9 gm. of Fine Sea Salt.

Then, do a good job of completely mixing these ingredients and then let the total batch rise overnight.

I hope that explaination will permit you to understand the article's details now.

Enjoy :)
Ron

teresakay's picture
teresakay

thanks so much ron

ill take small amount of starter and make sure i add equal weight flour and water

and let it rise

before adding the 50 grams of flour

and small amounts of oil and salt :)

 

seems like this would be a basic recipie for pizza dough?

or bagels?  pretzels?

thanks so much

looking so forward to it

cheers :)

tee

im just learning sourdough starter speak

you helped me a lot :)

RonRay's picture
RonRay

Tee, that should work just fine (^_^)

Ron

teresakay's picture
teresakay

Dear Ron,

 i took out my starter from the fridge (65grams)

i dont measure my flour water ratio..i just add enough water to make a wet dough consistancy

however i did just now take that starter of 65 grams and i added exactly 65 grams of flour and 65 grams of water

was that correct?

how much starter should i use to make the crackers

once my starter has doubled in size i can use it to make crackers

no matter what amount of starter i have just add only the small amount of 50 grams of flour?

kindly

thanks

tee...so grateful i have someone to talk to about starter :)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

teresakay's picture
teresakay

i added exactly 65 g. flour and 65 g. of water to my 65g. of starter i pulled from the fridge

my starter in the fridge i feed no less than five days ago

it had a slight grey coating and it was slightly acetone in smell

whats up with that?

did it not feed it enough maybe? a large enough amount

that acetone means it ran out of starch....am i right and the protein bacteria took over the starch bacteria

i thought when i feed the starter i am suppose to feed it at least the same amount of my current starter

is that right?

RonRay's picture
RonRay

There is nothing wrong. This is a normal condition. Just stir it well.

teresakay's picture
teresakay

update...i added 65 g. of flour instead of 50

added the coconut oil and a pinch of salt

i added a bit more flour just so it was a dough that was not sticky

one that i know i can roll out on the counter

RonRay's picture
RonRay

That's called experimentation, and the way some great bakes are found. (^_^)

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