The Fresh Loaf

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What's your favorite Bread Machine Cookbook

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calchef12's picture
calchef12

What's your favorite Bread Machine Cookbook

I am new to bread-making and recently purchased a Zoji Breadmaker (2 lb loaf) and have been trying out the various recipes in the booklet.
I was wondering if you have any favorite go-to cookbook when it comes to making breads. I am interested specially in breads and savory snacks like rusks and crackers, not so much in cakes. Thanks for sharing.

mini_maggie's picture
mini_maggie

 

Maybe Calif. given your handle, but Donna Washburn and Heather Butt's 300 Best Canadian Bread Machine Recipes is really good, and gives 1.5, 2 and 3 lb options for most recipes.   Covers the basics, hearth breads, whole grains, savory breads, fruited breads, flatbreads & wraps, sourdoughs and bagels, rolls, dessert and sweet breads.  It's written for Canadian flour which I understand can be stronger than some US flours but I think any good quality high protein flour should give comparable results. 

calchef12's picture
calchef12

Yeah, I am based in California. I ordered this book and am looking forward to trying out the recipes. Thank you for your recommendation. I am going to use King Arthur flour, hopefully that should compare well with Canadian flour. When you say stronger, do you mean it absorbs more water - So I may need to adjust the liquids accordingly ?

 

mini_maggie's picture
mini_maggie

Stronger means higher protein, more gluten.  Sorry, not a term I knew before I started reading here either!

King Arthur flour should be very comparable.  I would try the recipes as written and go from there.   I've had great luck with every one I've tried from that book on the first go.  

I will often substitute at least a cup or cup and a half of whole wheat flour in a 1.5 lb recipe, and they've still worked too.   When I use whole wheat, I'll often do it on overnight timer and put the ww flour on top of the wet ingredients before any other flour in the recipe, so it has time to hydrate overnight, and all my loaves have risen beautifully. 

Good luck!  Hope you enjoy the book.

 

mariana's picture
mariana

I also have this bread machine, Zojirushi Virtuoso and find recipes from the booklet exceptionally good, breads beautiful and tasty ( I do adjust water, increase up to 30%, for our Canadian flour and add 1g of yeast). I think I could live on Zojirushi recipes for bread alone.

 

Yet if I had to recommend a good book on bread machine recipes and a great book on breads overall it's Beth Hensperger's The Bread Lover's Bread Machine Cookbook. Absolutely the best in many ways, including clear explanation of different types of yeast to use in bread machines and the chapter on sourdoughs is beyond good, or even excellent. Outstanding. It is also the only book where I don't have to adjust anything in the recipes, including water. It works as is, straight from the book pages.

Beth recommends using vital wheat gluten for breads baked in bread machine. I prefer using fresh egg white in the same amount as gluten that she recommends, or dry egg white powder, equivalent amount. It works  better for me.

best wishes,

mariana

jcking's picture
jcking

Does Beths' book use weight (grams/ounces) or spoons and cups?

thanks, Jim

dsadowsk's picture
dsadowsk

What do you get by using egg whites instead of gluten?

I tried a couple recipes from Hensperger's book and didn't like the results, so I put it aside. But then  I tried her partial whole wheat flax seed recipe, and it came out fantastic.

mariana's picture
mariana

I tried the Sennebeck Hill  bread and Roasted Garlic Bread from her book and both were outstanding.

Egg white works more or less the same as additional gluten in bread dough, i.e. it tends to increase the volume up to 20-25% when added in the amount of 1 egg white to 1 kg (2.2lbs) of whole wheat flour, or of mix of rye and wheat flours . With white flour dough it tends to inrease volume about 15-20% when added in the amount of 2 per quart of liqid in dough.

However , it also makes crumb more moist and bread keeps full 36hrs longer than ordinary yeasted bread. Addition of gluten tends to dry out the crumb, make it dry and gummy to bite.  

Addition of gluten requires more mixing time and more fermentation time, not so with added egg whites. 

This data is from Walter T Banfield (his book 'Manna', A Comprehensive Treatise on Bread Manufacture, 2nd ed). My experience fully confirms it.

mariana

jcking's picture
jcking

Mariana,

Very interesting about the egg whites. do you use 30g to equal one large egg white? and do you have a bakers math % you use for the egg whites?

Thanks, Jim

mariana's picture
mariana

Jim,

 1 large egg white is 33g, according to USDA.

Beth Hensperger uses gluten as improver for bread machine dough, I use the same amounts, but in weight of egg whites

1.8- 3.5% (of weight of flour in recipe) for white flour dough

2.7-5.3% for whole grain wheat dough

5.3-10.6% for stiff whole grain dough and dough containing non-gluten flour (oats, rye flour, etc.)

Bansfield recommends to use egg whites as improver in similar amounts:

3.3% of weight of whole grain flour or 7% of weight of liquid in the recipe for white flour.

mariana 

 

 

jcking's picture
jcking

In other words one large egg white per 2 Lb loaf

mariana's picture
mariana

Yes, correct,

Because I get them liquid from the store,

in practical terms, it's 2 Tbsp of egg whites (about 30g ) for me when I mix dough for a full size loaf (from about 450-500g of flour) in Zo

And  3 Tbsp of egg whites (about 40-45g) for a full size whole grain loaf, or wheat with rye, wheat with 7grain cereal, etc.

I am thinking about switching to egg white in dry form, to be able to mix it with flour and that will make recipes suitable for the delayed mixing cycle in bread machine. then I would have to recalculate the amounts, about 1:8 by weight.

I.e. 30g of fresh egg whites equals to 4g dried,

40g fresh - to 5-6g dried.

Jim, what is milk fat content of sour cream in your recipe for the jalapeno-jack bread?

mariana

jcking's picture
jcking

Standard (not low fat) Sour Cream at my grocer.

Serving=30g, (2 Tbls) Total fat =8%, Saturated Fat =3.59g/18%, Trans fat =0

Dried egg whites sounds interesting. I understand large bakeries use dried eggs to save the time of breaking and/or separating.

Very interesting conversation, Jim

jcking's picture
jcking

Using 33g for the egg white, and 87.6% of that is water, Water = 30g and actual egg stuff 3g. So if using one egg per 2 Lb loaf subtract 30g from the water weight. Milk would be a fifferent weight. Anyone care to take a shot at that calculation? :-)

Jim

mariana's picture
mariana

I don't change the weight of water (or milk) in the recipe, Jim. I ADD egg white to that. I.e. it takes care of itself, it doesn't liquefy the dough too much and it doesn't absorb additional water, as vital gluten would.

 

Fresh Egg white is already a fully hydrated protein, which when kneaded-aerated (or, more commonly,  beaten as part of cake foams or pastry creams) ends up as a stifff foam, capable of holding its shape. Whereas vital wheat gluten still has to absorb n times its weight in water, depending on its quality in order to be able to hold gases and keep shape.  

mariana

jcking's picture
jcking

If my math is correct; For white flour,

Egg white of one large egg = 30g

quart of liquid (I'll use water) = 948g

My 2Lb loaf uses 340g water

then egg white = 21.42g

Agree?

edit; I think we bumped heads

Jim

 

mariana's picture
mariana

Jim, she gives cups and spoons (American, not those that come with the bread machine) in the recipe and a table for the equivalents in ounces in the table on page 18. Additional items are listed in her other book, The Bread Bible. I translate every recipe into grams before I bake. Those items for which she doesn't list weight equivalents, I look them up on the USDA nutrient database.

http://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/list

I don't trust cups and spoons,  because for Zojirushi a difference in 1-2 tbsp of flour or water is already a difference between a great bread and a failure. And I like to see baker's percentages, to understand the formula better.

mariana

jcking's picture
jcking

Yes, I agree, grams for me. Good to know she lists equivalents. And I also believe no two Zo's are alike. I usually need to bake a new recipe about 3 times to make adjustments for a good looking loaf. I have a good recipe for a Jalapeno/Jack cheese loaf if your interested.

Thanks again, Jim

mariana's picture
mariana

I hear you, Jim. Initially, it was taking me up to 4 bakes to adjust and fine tune my behaviour (I assumed she was right and I was wrong, : )) , to get a great bread out of Zo, but now it is a smoother sailing.

 

 The biggest issue was our Canadian flour, much stronger than Japanese bread flour and much more water absorbent. So I learned to adjust water, yeast and prooving time slightly. Now, each recipe comes out just perfect immediately and sometimes I  bake the same bread twice on the same day, becasue it is so fantastic, so beautiful and tasty.

 

I understand what she does and how she handles dough and baking better. I've been baking in Zo since December 30th (got her for Christmas), so I am still a newbie, but the bread is good, all of it.

Yes, please, share your recipe. Do you have pictures of your bread machine bread?

Thanks!

mariana

jcking's picture
jcking

Wife has camera and is working away from home. You may need to adjust for your type of flour in the recipe. Apologies for thread jacking this post.

Makes a 1 1/2 lb loaf, Jalapeno Jack loaf for the Zo.

250g Whole milk, 58g sour cream, 26g sugar, 5g IDY, 200g bread flour, 210g white wheat flour, 7g salt, 28g unsalted butter, 1/2 cup red bell pepper (seeded cut into small cubes), 1/4 cup canned Jalapeno peppers (the canned ones are milder then whole fresh). 113g Jack cheese shredder or small cubes.

Directions;

Prep peppers into small cubes, In large bowl stir/whisk, milk, sour cream (1/4 cup) and sugar, pour into BM tub. Sprinkle IDY on top. In large bowl stir/whisk flours and salt then add to BM. On top of this place butter cubed into 8 pieces (2 Tbls) . Set BM to basic w/med crust. (I always use preheat) Press start. After approx 30 mins, when the Zo beeps for add, add peppers and cheese.

Jim

mariana's picture
mariana

Thank you!

mariana's picture
mariana

  

 

Jim, thanks again for the recipe. The level of heat in this bread is just right. Very lovely.

This is what my Zo baked from your ingredients. It's majestic, like feathery cheese souffle meets brioche or something.

 

 

mariana

 

jcking's picture
jcking

Glad you liked the formula and it worked for you. I tried adding the egg white to the mix. You're quite right, the loaf rose higher, had a slightly softer texture and looks like it will keep longer. So thank you for the egg suggestion.

Jim

davidg618's picture
davidg618

I checked Amazon. To my amazement--it was published in 2000--it is still available through them, and prices are reasonable.

The book: BREAD MACHINE: how to prepare the perfect loaf, Jennie Shapter

Since I've been improving my baking skills during the last three years my wife has mostly taken over our bread machine baking; before that I did most of the machine baking; so we've both used this book extensively and praise it highly: five stars. We picked it up, spontaneously, from a bargain book counter for five dollars, about a decade ago. Since then neither of us have felt the need to have any other book for bread machine baking. We too machine-bake with a Zo.

I won't comment in depth on the front-half's tutorial pages; it's been years since I referred to them, and both of us are now accomplished bread machine users. We go straight to the recipes. And great recipes they are.  We've never found an error in ingredients, or instructions. All results have been excellent.

I flipped through the tutorial pages. I recall I was especially grateful for the liberal and intelligent use of photographs throughout.

Here is the table of contents:

calchef12's picture
calchef12

Thank you everyone for your advice and tips. I made sandwich bread based on the "Classic Sandwich Bread" recipe from kingarthurflour.com and it came out excellent. I am going to follow some more of their recipes, they seem to be genuine and well-tested.

Based on your recommendation, I ordered these 2 books from amazon - 300 Best Bread Machine Recipes by Donna Washburn and The Ultimate Bread Machine Cookbook  by Jennie Shapter (I figured this is  newer edition than the one printed in 2002, so may contain measurements for the bigger machines like the Virtuoso, which were not available back then).

I also agree with some others on going for books with pictures - helps to picture what's expected and most importantly, it shows the recipes were really tested.

I will keep  you posted on how the recipes turn out :)