The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Whole wheat proofing help...

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travfren's picture
travfren

Whole wheat proofing help...

I cannot get my whole wheat dough to proof properly. The dough feels good after mixing, and the bulk fermentation is fine. I then divide it and shape it for the final proof. The dough will then proof until a certain point and stop. If i bake the dough at that stopping point it does not come out right. There is no oven spring. I am dividing the dough into 8oz pieces for hoagie rolls. This dough is made with a whole wheat poolsih and a soaker. Any help would be great. Thank you.

Ford's picture
Ford

I'm not sure how to answer you on this, but I'll give you a couple pointers.  Whole wheat flour requires more water or milk than does white flour.  Eighty-seven percent hydration for the loaf would not be too much water.  It also requires more time to absorb that water.  You say you use a soaker, be sure that the soaking is at least an hour at room temperature or longer in the refrigerator.

Ford

clazar123's picture
clazar123

Enter "poke test" in the search box and read a bit.You may find it very useful.

I suspect the rolls may be a bit overproofed but in the absence of more info, that is just a guess. That is why the poke test info may be helpful to you.

WW dough needs to have a nicely developed gluten that is nice and relaxed in order to rise properly for bulk fermentaion and proofing and finally oven spring. It needs adequate hydration (as mentioned) in order to accomplish all of this.

If you need more info, you will probably have to post the recipe and technique you used.

 

 

Crider's picture
Crider

Most whole wheat flours I've seen don't have added malted barley flour like average AP and bread flour do. So this means the yeast on your dough have run out of food. You need to shorten your fermenting time to accomodate.