The Fresh Loaf

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Multi-grain Sourdough with Sprouts, Scald, Seeds, Nuts and Prunes

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dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Multi-grain Sourdough with Sprouts, Scald, Seeds, Nuts and Prunes

This is an continuation of the last multi-grain SD bake except that the hydration is slightly lower at 68%, the multi-grain flours were 54 %, the add in goodies are increased substantially since this bread has multi-grain sprouts to go with the multi-grain soaker and we also have pumpkin and sunflower seeds, as well as, pistachio and filbert nuts with a hint of prunes too.

  

We like the last bake very much but we decided to bake this bread differently in that rather than baking on a stone with a combination of Sylvia’s and David’s steam, we baked this bread on a stone with a Goodwill bought DO bottom overturned on the chacon.

  

We followed the same method as last time with 10 min of French lap and folds but instead of using S&Fs to incorporate the scald, sprouts, seeds and nuts we used French folds every 15 minutes 3 times to incorporate the add ins and then used one S&F at the end of an hour to round out gluten development..

  

The dough was rested for 10 minutes before shaping the center ball of the chacon, its 4 surrounding knotted rolls and the really big bialy, made by stretching it like a pizza from the edge hanging down to cover the rest of the shapes in the basket.  Each was put into rice flour, basket side only, before being placed in a rice floured basket.

 

We then let the dough develop on the heating pad for 1 1/2 hours before refrigerating for 40 hours at 38 F in a plastic trash can liner.  It rose about 50% in the fridge which is what we were expecting.  We then took it out of the fridge and put it back on the heating pad for 3 hours before starting up Big Old Betsy to preheat at 500 F.

 

By the time Betsy got up to temperature and we added 20 minutes to the preheat, to get the stone up to 500 F too,  The dough had been on the pad for 4 hours and was still about 50% in volume greater than when it went into the basket.  We un-molded the chacon using a parchment covered peel and slid the chacon onto the stone while covering it with the DO bottom as a cloche.

 

After 2 minutes we turned the oven down to 450 F and continued to bake it a total of 20 minutes covered and then removed the DO bottom and turned the oven down to 425 F, convection this time.

 

Every 5 minutes we rotated the bread on the stone 90 degrees and in another 30 minutes the bread hit 203 F and we turned off the oven cracked the door and allowed the bread to crisp on the stone for 8 more minutes before removing it to a cooling rack.  It reached 207 F while resting on the stone.

 

The bread really looks great on the outside, beautifully cracked and brown as one would want even though it didn’t spring much in the oven.  We didn’t expect it to spring though after it didn’t do much on the heating pad for 4 hours either. It smells terrific enough.   We sure hope this fine looker is not a brick on the inside but we will have to wait until we slice it later today, well after it cools.

Formula

Multi-grain Sourdough with Sprouts, Scald, Seeds, Nuts and Prunes

 

 

 

Starter

Build 1

Total

%

SD Starter

20

20

4.65%

Buckwheat

4

4

1.18%

Quinoa

4

4

1.18%

Barley

4

4

1.18%

Whole Wheat

5

5

1.47%

Spelt

4

4

1.18%

Kamut

4

4

1.18%

Dark Rye

5

5

1.47%

White Whole Wheat

20

20

5.88%

AP

30

30

8.82%

Water

60

60

17.65%

Total Starter

160

160

47.06%

 

 

 

 

Starter

 

 

 

Hydration

77.78%

 

 

Levain % of Total

16.55%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

Toady Tom's Tasty Toasted Tidbits

4

1.18%

 

Red Malt

3

0.88%

 

White Malt

3

0.88%

 

Buckwheat

21

6.18%

 

Quinoa

21

6.18%

 

Whole Wheat

20

5.88%

 

Spelt

21

6.18%

 

Kamut

21

6.18%

 

Barley

21

6.18%

 

Dark Rye

20

5.88%

 

Potato Flakes

20

5.88%

 

Oat Flour

20

5.88%

 

AP

145

42.65%

 

Dough Flour

340

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

7

1.63%

 

Soaker & Sprout Water

220

64.71%

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

64.71%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

430

 

 

Water 70. Sprout and Soaker Water

290

 

 

Total Dough Hydration

67.44%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

68.02%

 

 

Total Weight

967

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whole Grains

54.65%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scald

 

%

 

WW

12.5

3.68%

 

Rye

12.5

3.68%

 

Quinoa

12.5

3.68%

 

Kamut

12.5

3.68%

 

Buckwheat

12.5

3.68%

 

Spelt

12.5

3.68%

 

Total Scald

75

22.06%

 

 

 

 

 

Multigrain Sprouts

 

%

 

Kamut

12.5

3.68%

 

Quinoa

12.5

3.68%

 

Buckwheat

12.5

3.68%

 

Rye

12.5

3.68%

 

WW

12.5

3.68%

 

Spelt

12.5

3.68%

 

Total Sprouts

75

22.06%

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

Sunflower 15, Pumpkin 15. Prune 20

50

14.71%

 

Pistachio 15, Filbert 20

35

10.29%

 

Barley Malt

5

1.47%

 

Total

90

26.47%

 

 

Comments

linder's picture
linder

DA-

That is one serious loaf of bread - there is so much in it, I'll bet it has fantastic texture and flavor.  Not a brick at all.  Love the crunchy looking crust too.

Linda

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

still crunchy for breakfast this morning.  The taste is very good.  The texture with the all the goodies is nice too.  It is s pleasure to eat.  I'm thinking this multi-grain bread might my new favorite bread unless the one today turns out better.  This one is keeper for sure.

Glad you liked it Linda!  Happy baking.

isand66's picture
isand66

That has got be one of the longest ingredient lists for a bread I've seen yet!  It looks and sounds like it was worth it though.

great looking crust and crumb as usual.  Another one to add to your ever growing list of successful bakes!

regards

Ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

going while so far, far away?  I thought this one might peak your interest in bread making once you get home again.  The list looks long, and it is,  but the grains are the same for sprouts, scald or flour so its not too bad - just lots of different prep steps.  As you know, if you bake a couple of different kinds of bread every week the next thing you have is a little something of everything left over that needs using up.  Plus, I believe in truth in advertising so, if you say multi-grain, seeds, nuts... etc. it better be multi-grain with plenty of all the rest :-)

I've got an identical one go bake today that is YW instead of SD, not as intricate with the design since the hydration and whole grains are up another 5% with some unmentionables like additional seeds to perfume the bread like coriander, anise, fennel , caraway if I can figure out how to stick them to the outside since I forgot to put them on the inside.  Got to replace the missing sour we like so much with something.

I could eat this bread every day - just delicious.

Safe travels Ian - glad you liked the bread.

JOHN01473's picture
JOHN01473

I am beginning to think that you do not see an envelope, let alone the edge of such a thing when you put ingredients in bread.
I think things around you must be very nervous when you bake for fear of ending up in the loaf.
Is there anything you have ever put into a bake and regretted it after?
Another great bake - you inspire me to push back accepted thoughts on bread.
Well done.

John

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

my apprentice has started hiding her brown rice and whole oat Nutro Meal under the sink- she too must be worried :-)

If you look at the list is all pretty standard stuff for breads.  Grain, water, salt, SD Levin, potato, nuts and seeds with a little bit of dried fruit.   All have been commonly used in bread for about forever - maybe not is this combination.  Even the malts and Toadies are made from grains.   Some aren't used as often as they should be like; pistachios, hazelnuts, buckwheat and quinoa  but I did drop barley this time since I ran out :-)  Still, I had some durum semolina, durum atta,  and bunch of different seeds that didn't make the list  - but might today.

Being a bread libertarian, I say bread can include just about anything found in the grocery aisle and for Ian - the Auto Parts Store and I'm sticking with it.

Yes, there has been some items that I have used where the amounts I put in were nearly inedible.  I made some Scandinavian Cardamom Bread one time and had bought some green pods at the Chinese grocery that were very fresh.  By the time I got the seeds out and crushed them into a powder in the mortar and put it in the bread is was just too much cardamom.  A friend from Sweden loved it and said it was a bread you have to grow up eating and is an acquired taste.  I also had a bad experience with too much coriander one time too so I am still a little light on bread spices to be on the safe side.

I've been pretty lucky in making bread someone, somewhere, can eat if you look hard enough, by sticking to stuff normally found in bread and stuff that Ian has used, said he liked by living to tell the tale!

This is one fine tasting bread and I'm glad you liked it John. 

With all the bread being baked by millions of bakers over thousands of years, there really isn't much of anything new in bread to discover but there are bazillion new tastes, textures and smells in bread you can personally experience.  Luckily, none of us will live long enough to experience even a small fraction of them  and their billions of possible combinations.

isand66's picture
isand66

Okay...who snuck that corned beef I there?

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

turkey bologna you see on that sandwich.  Won't get the corned beef going until St Paddy's day:-)  Will be doing a pastrami pretty soon though.  Have everything ready to go except the brisket which hasn't been a decent price lately for some reason. 

Have you ever tried to pastrami cure and smoke a pork shoulder?

isand66's picture
isand66

I'm telling you I saw a corned beef in one of your photos! Must be the Chinese govt playing tricks on me!  Have not tried pastrami cure before but your idea sound real good to me.

im almost done here and can't wait to get home.  

Lookmforeard to your next post.

ian

gmagmabaking2's picture
gmagmabaking2

must be scary full of goodies... I would have to shop for all of that list!... I am a real minimalist when it comes to storage. You, sir, have amazing goodies at your fingertips... that is what I think... I could shop in your pantry!

Great looking loaf.

Diane

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

most of the ingredients were picked up at Whole Foods or Sprouts in small amounts.  The malts you make from the berries and the barley malt syrup can be had at a brew supply place.  I keep all the nuts and the seeds in the freezer in 2 plastic shopping bags and the berries are in 2 plastic shopping bags in the pantry.  Not too bad really if you buy small amounts to keep everything as fresh as you can.  You always end up with left over bits and pieces of something if you make different kinds breads :-)

You would like this bread as much as I do even if throwing out half the ingredients :-)

Glad you liked it and bake on!

evening's picture
evening

A truly inspired creation.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

perfect bread for a late night baker who needs to stretch their wings instead of sleeping !  It is a good looker inside and out and it tastes even better.  You would like it a lot!

Thanks for the fine compliment and

Happy Baking

gmabaking's picture
gmabaking

and pistachios standing tall! What a great combinaton of goodies all rolled (or kneaded) into one package.

Not only is your assistant hiding the NutroMeal,Word has it that she has warned the canary next door to keep his seeds under lock and key.

The taste must be deep and intense. Beautiful bread!

Barbra

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

wanting to strike for not being mentioned and they get overlooked for bread purposes more than pistachios do around here :-)  Pistachios have the color but the filberts have the flavor.  Canaries have no worries, I use seeds and nuts already hulled except for eh pistachios and filberts !  This is very nice tasting bread with all the bells and whistles.

Glad you liked it Barbara.

Happy baking.