The Fresh Loaf

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Need family friendly ideas using both my mill and my Zojirushi bread maker

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stacibw's picture
stacibw

Need family friendly ideas using both my mill and my Zojirushi bread maker

I LOVE fresh milled hard wheat.  Problem is, Im the only one in my family of five that does.  I've attempted for over a year to get them to appreciate it - but it just hasnt happened.  So, now Im looking for a compromise.  Can anyone offer suggestions for fresh milled bread that doesnt taste so.....wholesome?  Seriously, my husband is all about Sunbeam.  I made a test loaf using King Arthur Bread Flour - just to see how it would be.  I could barely choke it down and my husband thought he was in heaven.  I was thinking about using 1/2 milled flour and 1/2 store bought - just to see how that goes over.  Maybe I could even get away with 3/4 milled hard wheat.  Ideas?  Anyone else in my shoes?

Im a VERY beginner - just set up this account today.  I really want to make use of my mill and my bread maker - both were expensive investments that I'd like to feel like Im taking advantage of.

Thanks for any suggestions or ideas!

Staci in Georgia

charbono's picture
charbono

Try sifting some of the bran out.

 

linder's picture
linder

Maybe try grinding some soft white wheat berries(Bob's Red Mill carries this product) and mix with the hard red winter wheat fresh ground flour(bran sifted out)?  I make a bread with 2 1/2 cups of my hard red winter wheat (bran sifted out) and 1 cup of commercial bread or all purpose flour (King Arthur) but, the recipe is kneaded by hand.  I add a couple of tablespoons of bran back into the dough once it's completely kneaded.  King Arthur also makes a white whole wheat that might work to 'disguise' the wholesomeness. 

stacibw's picture
stacibw

Ive been taught that hard white wheat is for bread, quick breads, etc and that soft white wheat is only for things like cookies and cinnamon rolls.  Is this bogus info?  Can I use them interchangeably?  What's the real difference between them?

linder's picture
linder

What you were taught is true, but in this instance, I was suggesting to substitute some(not all) of the hard flour in order to perhaps get the soft crumb that non-whole wheat lovers like.  The soft wheat won't have as high a protein percentage so I think it might help with achieving a softer crumb.  Just a thought.

Linda

stacibw's picture
stacibw

sounds like a great plan to me - at least worth a shot!  Another question - and this will reveal exactly how beginner I am....if I use store bought flour (say King Arthur bread flour, since I have that already) and my own milled wheat, with some soft wheat mixed in (and then some of the bran sifted out) - do I still use the regular amounts of gluten, lecithin and yeast and other ingredients as I normally would when only using fresh milled?  Or do I need to reduce those dry ingredients?

linder's picture
linder

I have to admit I don't use any additional gluten or lecithin in my mix of hard red home milled wheat and KA bread flour and I keep the amount of yeast the same.  Hydration of the dough may be a little higher using less whole wheat, but not by much depending on how much hard wheat you are replacing with KA flour.  Right now, I use 2 1/2 cups home ground whole wheat to 1 cup KA flour and that seems to work well for me(that's probably why I don't need the extra gluten).  The lecithin works as a dough conditioner, I believe, and may be necessary in a bread machine situation, where as when kneading by hand, I can just keep at it until I satisfied with the dough's look and feel.  

stacibw's picture
stacibw

Really? How fantastic!  I 've never considered not adding the gluten and lecithin in my bread - but I will now!  You've been most helpful - thank you for your time!  I'll give it a shot tomorrow afternoon and see how it goes - we still have a few slices of the wretched white bread that I made over the weekend that hubby still wants to eat up.  Im so much enjoying reading this forum - I can't believe all of the great info that I've seen so far!  This site will make bread making exciting again!  Thanks!

  

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

This won't help you use your bread maching BUT the book I found that made a huge difference in my whole grain loaves is Peter Reinhart's Whole Grain Breads.  His epoxy method for using pre-ferments makes loaves that are delicious.  My family and lots of my neighbors can't get enough of the breads I bake now.  All are baked using 100% freshly ground whole grains.

That being said....if you have a good local library - take a peek at WGB before giving up.

You might also do a search here and check out txfarmer's 100% ww loaves.  They are all shreddably soft and delicious :-)

Good Luck,

janet

stacibw's picture
stacibw

Well, I made a new loaf this afternoon - still waiting for hubby to get home so that I can get his opinion, but I think it is a huge improvement and I think that it's something that we can both live with.  I used 1/2 milled hard white wheat (decided not to sift it at all) and 1/2 King Arthurs bread flour.  I didnt use any lecithin, but I did add gluten as usual.  I think next time I'll try it with 3/4 milled, 1/4 King Arthurs and no gluten added - just so I'll know the difference.  Im sure to a real bread baker my bread isn't great - but coming from 40 plus years of buying store bought loaf bread - this is a great start!  Thanks for your help - and I will try to find the suggested books!

Wingnut's picture
Wingnut

Keep Fighting the Good Fight!

linder's picture
linder

Stacibw,

Let us know how it goes when hubby tries the bread, if it's a keeper or not. 

Linda

stacibw's picture
stacibw

Hubby liked the bread!  Kids LOVED the bread.  I liked it too - so, it's a keeper for sure.  I do want to play with it a little more and see if I can get away with 3/4 milled and 1/4 store bought - will try that next time.  This loaf was pretty, soft and had a good crust to it.  And although it made me cringe to hear it, my husband said, "This will work - it tastes and feels just like what you get at Kroger" - sigh.....baby steps.  baby steps.....

 

mini_maggie's picture
mini_maggie

Like you, I'm inexperienced and starting with a bread machine, and trying to use as much whole grain as possible.  I've had great luck with high percentages of whole wheat in the Zo on the overnight timer, so the ww flour has extra time to hydrate overnight sitting on top of the water in the machine.  Nice soft sandwichy loaves with great crumb.   This is however with store bought ww flour, not home milled.  No extra gluten or other conditioners.  Good luck and please keep sharing what works for you!

Edited to add P.S. Recipes with milk and/or oats also soften up the bread for picky hubs and kids.