The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Sauerkraut!

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linder's picture
linder

Sauerkraut!

We turned 5 lbs. of cabbage into shreds using a mandolin/v-slicer.  Then added 3 TBSP. salt and 2 TBSP. of caraway.  Everything got mashed into a one gallon glass jar, topped off with a clean plastic bag with water in it as an air stop.  This will sit in a cool place for about 2-3 weeks and voila, sauerkraut!  Crunchy and tasty with rye bread, pastrami and cheese sandwiches!

grind's picture
grind

We make the same stuff, but with fennel seeds and hot chili pepper flakes.

Juergen's picture
Juergen

A typical German food that would pair very well with rye bread and Bavarian Weisswurst. Enjoy!

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

go well in there too, 3 to 6 of each per head of cabbage.  A nice looking Bay-leaf also.   

I finally figured out what kind of plant I was growing... (mystery plant) dark green and purple, very bumpy beautiful long leaves.  Nero Di Toscana.  It's a kind of napa cabbage or kale with a narrow center vein,  growing nicely between my petunias.   I got an idea with my purple, white and now dk napa flavored cabbage...  Pink with dark green strips.  Could be interesting.  Thanks.

 

Crider's picture
Crider

I love real sauerkraut! There's only two of us, so I'm doing sauerkraut in 1 pint/1 pound batches to keep it crunchy.

Since autumn, we did dill cucumber pickles, both green and red serrano pepper mash, carrot, cauliflower (made yellow with turmeric), and turnip (made pink with beets). It's so easy. There's even a huge Pickle Bibliography online provided by North Carolina State University with lots of info.

linder's picture
linder

Crider -

yes, real sauerkraut is soooo different from store bought.  The homemade kind still has crunch and flavor other than the vinegar/boiled kind in jars at the supermarket.  I'll bet that green and red serrano pepper mash is HOT!  We dried a bunch of serrano chilis, ground them up and made (I guess you could call it) a hot paprika that can be used in place of cayenne pepper in recipes.  I'll have to check out the Pickle Bibliography, sounds like fun.

Linda

grind's picture
grind

Wow, that's a great bibliography.  Thank you.  We make small batches too and like to eat it throughout the kraut's fermentation process.  We like the eating the changes.

clazar123's picture
clazar123

I have done saurkraut,pickles,kefir, villis and lately-kimchi. Love them all! I hate canned saurkraut but the homefermented variety is delicious.

Kimchi is pretty much the same but has an added paste or sauce. There can be fish sauce and seafood involved or soy sauce and no protein at all (my preference). My original recipe called for 5# napa cabbage and 1 CUP of dried red pepper flakes. YIKES! I cut it down to 1/4 cup and my whole body lit up like a bonfire-WHOOSH! A friend that can eat raw serranos and habaneros thought it was still too hot! I'm down to 1 tbsp and I can actually taste it.The Korean dried red pepper is really hot!

There is a lovely book called "The Joy of Pickling"by Linda Zeidrich and "The Art of Fermentation" by the wildman of fermentation, Sandor Katz. There are other books by him.He has a website and travels the country doing classes. http://www.wildfermentation.com/

Did you know there are Fermentation Fests? Do a google and see if there is one near you!

Have bubbly fun!

 

linder's picture
linder

Yes, Clazar123, the book Wild Fermentation is what got me started on this fermentation journey.  I have some friends who make great lacto-fermented sodas, Eatwell Softers, in flavors such as lavander, rosemary, rose geranium and others, who piqued my interest in fermenting.  Sourdough starters and making cheese are also of interest, and I love the results of both.  Thanks for the additional lead on "The Joy of Pickling".  I'll have to look for Fermentation Fests in my area, it would be hard to believe there wouldn't be at least one close by here in Northern California.

Thanks again,

Linda

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Great Book!  Not in my grasp though.  I got Kimchi in the fridge and a jar of Kimchi paste.  You might want to ferment without all the  peppers and then add them later between the leaves using a paste.  White Kimchi is not spicy.  I have more radishes available than napa.  

Mini

Linda Ziedrich's picture
Linda Ziedrich

Clazar123 and Mini, thanks for the plugs. Everybody, remember that when you make kimchi you can add as much or as little ground red pepper as you like, and it can be anything from sweet Hungarian paprika to the hottest chile you can find. You might also try flaked rather than ground red pepper.

Linda Ziedrich, www.agardenerstable.com