The Fresh Loaf

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Multi Seed Loaf with Rye & Spelt Flour

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Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Multi Seed Loaf with Rye & Spelt Flour

Since I am still nursing a brand new rye starter to life (finally there with great help from Minioven) I made a bread today with a biga preferment.  I have been craving a loaf with seeds coming out of the yingyang so I stuffed this bread full of cracked wheat, steel cut oats and rye berries.  I wanted a hearty loaf so I used a combination of bread flour with dark rye and spelt flours.

Never used a biga before so it was a new adventure.  Actually, not really.  Same as poolish just drier. 

Now that I have my rye starter up and running, I will be trying a much anticipated go at a danish rye, packed with rye berries.  This loaf today will have to keep me chewing happily till then.  Thanks to Franko for the inspiration.

 

 

Orchiddoc71's picture
Orchiddoc71

That bread looks delicious.  Can you post a recipe?  I would love to make a bread like this.

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Hey, thanks.  This one was quite easy.  Similar to Jeffrey Hamelman's 5 Grain Levain.

Biga

85 g bread flour

9 g dark rye flour

2 g sea salt

61 g water

1/8 tsp instant yeast

Soaker

40 g rye berries

25 g cracked wheat

30 g steel cut oats

99 g boiling water

1 g sea salt

Final Dough

180 g bread flour

23 g dark rye flour

23 g spelt flour

All of biga

All of soaker

117 g water

3 g sea salt

2 g instant yeast

 Directions

Mix all ingredients for biga and let sit in a covered bowl for 14-16 hours @ 70F

Mix all ingredients for the soaker and leave covered at room temperature overnight.

Final dough:

  • Mix the flours and biga with the water.  Autolyse for 30 minutes. 

  • After autolyse is complete add the salt and instant yeast and mix till the dough is slightly developed. Add the soaker and develop to a medium gluten strength.

  • Bulk ferment at 76F/24C for 90 minutes giving a full stretch and fold every 30 minutes.

  • After the last S&F round the dough to medium tight ball, cover and allow 15 -20 minutes for the dough to relax before shaping. 

  • Shape and place seam side up in a well floured, cloth lined bowl or brotform.  Proof for 45 - 50 mins.

  • Preheat the oven to 485F/251C prior to baking. 

  • Final rise of 45-50 minutes at 74F/23C covered with plastic wrap. 

  • Flip the loaf onto parchment paper and bake with steam for 15 minutes.  Remove the steam system and lower the heat to 465F/240C.  Bake for another 10 minutes.  Turn heat down to 455 and bake a further 10-15 minutes or until the internal temperature is 210F/98.8C

  • Turn the oven off, prop the door open slightly and leave the loaf in the oven for 10 to dry out the crust.

Makes one medium loaf.

Happy baking :)

John

Floydm's picture
Floydm

That is a beauty, John.  Would you mind if I featured it on the homepage for a bit?

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Floyd thanks and of course!  I would be honored if you used it!

John

varda's picture
varda

as I mostly look at blog posts rather than posts in the forums (this site is huge.)   Congratulations on getting on the front page.    Your bread looks terrific.  -Varda

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Thanks Varda...wow, I have so many people I would like to thank....my agent, all my fans who stuck with me through all the starter problems...oh, and my family, and..*music starts playing*..oh no, they're telling me to wrap up...thank you all :)

John

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Hi John,

I almost missed this too!  Beautiful!!! Love the crust color and how it opened up so nicely during the bake.  The grains look so nice and tasty.  Now I will have to make room in my bread line up to make one like this too.  I so often forget about using cracked grains and use nuts, seeds and fruits instead but when I do remember about grains people love the results.

Thanks for the inspiration!
Take Care,

Janet 

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

I am so glad that this bake invoked some lost ideas for you.  I hope it turns out for you.  All I have to say is this bread is great with peanut butter and strawberry jam.  Yikes.

John

isand66's picture
isand66

John great bake!  You're getting good at this bread making thing.  Congrats on the cover spot.

now if you want to take this one to the next level I would convert your biga to a sour dough starter for an even more rich flavor profile.

regards

Ian

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Ian.  Thanks to all you great bakers, I have been able to learn a thing or two on here. 

I am DYING to bake again with sourdough starter.  Minioven just got me through a long 3 week process of painful tries at starting a new starter.  My starter from the summer time died a month ago so I have been baking with commercial yeasts since.  I have learned that starting a starter in winter time here is virtually impossible without creating a 74 - 78 degree controlled room.

It is finally ready for baking.  My plan is to try this recipe soon with sourdough starter.

John

Adriana C's picture
Adriana C

I have active rye sour dough starter , 100% hydration , that I wish to use it instead of the biga .Could you please let me know if about 100 g will be enough for this recipe ?

TVM, Adriana

 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I think 100g would do it but you will need 45g more bread flour and 2g salt  (optional 10g water) to the recipe to balance the flour,  salt, and hydration amounts.  

The total dough weight is 700g.   The biga has 157g at 65% hydration.  

OR  you could elaborate the starter to 65% instead of 100% hydration using:   20g starter,  95g mixed flours,  60g water.  Then just add 2g salt to the dough recipe.

Adriana C's picture
Adriana C

Thank you very much for your advice .

For sure I will use the starter with 65% hydration and no yeast added to the final dough .

This kind of bread take longer time but it's  healthy and  I like the taste .

 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

One fine looking seedy loaf! 

That starter should be up soon.  

As it is progressing, and you like the aroma, slip some discards into yeasted or baking powder recipes. 

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Mini, you must be sick of my messages by now, but you sure helped me A LOT through the sourdough starter process.  Thanks a bunch and I can't wait to start using it again.

John

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I might go through withdrawal later, but heck, I have fun helping out.   I still got my little Copahue volcano to keep track of.  (back to orange from green)  I sent some travel starter to the Congo.  They have just the opposite problems with starter as it ferments like crazy, the kitchen one giant proofing box.  The beasties are "jungle inspired" with big appetites.    

Mini  

foodslut's picture
foodslut

I'm curious - I see your baking photo showing your loaf inside what looks like a roasting pan.  Also, I notice the loaf doesn't fill the pan a la Lahey no-knead - is this how you get the "keep max steam inside" effect?  

Again, congrats on a beautiful loaf!

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Thanks fellow Canadian foodslut.  I started using a roasting pan early in my baking beginnings last summer and never stopped (except for baguettes - they won't fit).  I find it produces good enough results, and some users even swear by it being better than a dutch oven due to it being easier to lower the dough into.

You are right, the dough does not fill the entire roaster (that would be one huge loaf!).  What I do is slash, lower the dough on parchment into the roaster, pour about 1/2 cup boiling water straight into the roaster, then cover with lid and in the oven it goes.  The water does not touch the dough as I have a few sheets of foil lining the bottom.  I just pour the water in so it goes under the foil.

Here is a link to my method.  Hope it helps!

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/30020/my-steaming-method

John

foodslut's picture
foodslut

Thanks for the details - keep enjoying your baking, eh? :)

foodslut's picture
foodslut

Tried it on a couple of loaves I worked on, and it worked great.  I even tried it without water in the bottom (while spraying the top of the loaf before slashing), and it still worked great.  Thanks again for the tip!

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

That's great to hear!  Glad it worked for you.  I'd like to see some bakes posted from you soon.

John

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

will be tough to beat when it comes to baking bread!  This is my kind of bread!  You have a very nice crust and crumb and a beautiful bloom.  This is what bread is all about.

Nice baking John!

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Dabrownman.  Thanks!  I can see you already imagining sprouting all those seeds/grains. 

John

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

I forgot to mention that the soaker to this recipe can be interchangeable with all sorts of grain/seed ingredients.  Just substitute equal amounts for sunflower seeds, flax, nuts, etc.  I would toast the seeds prior to adding to soaker for added nuttiness.

John

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

In my grain cupboard I have a can full of a 7-grain mix.  Thinking already done for me :-)  (I forget to use it but this presents the perfect opportunity :-)

Thanks,

Janet

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Sounds perfect :)

Have you ever tried toasted flax seeds?  I had no idea how much of a toasty punch they give until I tried one toasted seed!  Wow.

John

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

I have never toasted them... Just soaked and used them that way.  Do they stay crunchy if toasted then mixed with the dough?

Only seeds I usually toast are sesame but I don't always toast those.  Depends on how much I want their flavor to accent a bread.  (I buy sunflower seeds already toasted and prefer them toasted to raw.)

So many ideas out of such simple ingredients.....Now I will have to toast some and toss them in with the grains too. :-)

Thanks,

Janet

 

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Yes, they get a little crispy actually.  The outer skin gets a little brittle.  If you bite down on a flax seed raw with your front teeth, it's a bit chewy and when they are toasted they are a bit crispy.  The taste is surprisingly nutty.  I figured this out when a bunch of them fell off of a baked bread crust.  I ate a small handful of them and was pleasantly surprised.  Whenever I use them inside the bread, I pre toast them.

I am a huge fan of toasted sunflower seeds.  Pumpkin too. 

I realize now that toasting any grain or whole grain berry brings out a new flavour.

John

silas_miller's picture
silas_miller

So excited to try this. I'm new to bread baking, but love really seeded whole grain breads. My ultimate is a rye sourdough seeded loaf, but my sourdough culture keeps giving me issues. For now I am very excited to try this recipe. Thanks for sharing!!

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Hey thanks silas.  I am pretty new myself.

Sounds like you have the same problem I had.  I love sourdough seeded loaves but I could not get a starter going for a month.  Finally in the last few days, it is working and alive again.

I would love to do this same recipe but with sourdough starter instead of the commercial yeast.

John

silas_miller's picture
silas_miller

I think I fixed my culture woes by using a seedling sprouting heat mat and now after just 36 hours it is smelling great and very active. It went much slower the last time and ended up in the bad protien eating culture(nail polish smelling) place. This is the mat I use:

http://www.amazon.com/Hydrofarm-MT10006--19-1-2-Inch-Seedling/dp/B0001WV010

Does anyone know if the culture process is helped by having cycles of warmth vs continous warmth?

 

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Anyone who is good at converting yeast, etc in recipes, I would appreciate if you could convert this same recipe but into a levain, or using sourdough starter in lieu of commercial yeast.

Thanks!

John

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I think it might work out, proofing times will be longer.  Dough will need some more folding during the bulk rise.  :)

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Perfect! Thanks Mini.  I will try this variation soon.  I can't get off this danish rye thing.

John

PiPs's picture
PiPs

Hey John,

Congrats on the front page ... a fine lookin bread you've baked there.

Cheers,
Phil

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Thank you Phil.  Can you *ahem* see some copyright infringement on the photograph layout? ;)

Thank YOU Phil for your continued inspirational bakes.

John

Franko's picture
Franko

Gorgeous loaf John, nicely done! I'm really happy I was able to offer some inspiration for you to create your own lovely version of this bread and thrilled for you and it's well deserved front page posting. Awesome stuff !

Cheers,

Franko 

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Thank you Franko.  One look at all those seeds/grains in your bake put me on a path to success.

We need something to keep us going through these rainy dreary winters up here ;)

John

Lauraclimbs's picture
Lauraclimbs

Hi! Am interested in trying this dough and was wondering how you aquired your cracked grains. Do you buy them in store or crack whole grains at home? If so, how do you do so? Thanks!

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Lauraclimbs, it took me a few weeks to find a local grain mill that carries an abundance of different whole grains and flours.  I am close to Vancouver, BC so I am not sure what you may have locally in California.

Most of the typical grains such as whole oat berries, wheat berries, etc.  I got from the bulk section of a local major grocery store chain.  I had a hard time finding whole rye berries but just found that local mill I mentioned above.  The local grocery bulk section carries whole and cracked.  You can also look for Bob's Mill whole grains that come in small packages.  At my local grocery store, I find them near the flour/baking aisle.

If after all that, if you still can not find any, you should be able to at least find some 7 grain cereal mix in the bulk sections or cereal section of the grocery store.  That usually has some cracked grains right in the mix.  If all that fails, then you can always substitute the whole or cracked grains with seeds such as sunflower, flax, or pumpkin.

Good luck!

John

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

I found some places you can contact near you that may carry some whole grains, and if not, they might be able to lead you in the right direction.  That is how I finally found the local mill near me.

Sierra Saddlery & Feed

600 S. Main St., Bishop CA

or here:

http://www.ohkruse.com/California.html

Hope that helps!

John

Lauraclimbs's picture
Lauraclimbs

Thanks for the help! I actually get my whole grains (hard red winter wheat and kamut) from a local Coop in town. I saw some millet and sunflower seeds at the store today and think i might sub those in (with the steel cut oats). Hope to try out this recipe this week as a sourdough!

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Oh great.  Well please do post your results here.  Looking forward to it as I want to try this one with a sourdough starter.

John

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Oops.  I just realized I didn't answer your question about the cracking.  I don't crack the whole grain kernels at home.  I just buy them pre-cracked/cut.

I think I read some of Phil's (PiPs) posts that lead me to believe that crazy galoot cracks his own kernels...and mills his own flour.  That guy takes baking to levels that intimidate me.  They breed them different down under :)

John

Andra Magda's picture
Andra Magda

Woooww!!! Your bread looks gorgeous and delicious!!! The crust looks amaizing and your scoring was perfect:)!I've never worked with biga but when I will, I'll definetely ask for your advice! Best wishes and.. happy baking:)!Andra:). 

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Well thank you very much Andra :)

I wouldn't agree on the scoring.  I don't think it is perfect by any means.  It is one of my weak points in bread baking.  I do however, feel a bit better about it though!

Let me know if you need any help.  Judging by your bakes, I doubt you will need any help at all.

John

shoshanna673's picture
shoshanna673

Your multi seeded bread looks amazing! I am going to try this soon. One question re your steaming method .. do you leave your roaster lid on for the whole bake or remove to get that amazing colour on your bread? Also, perhaps a suitably sized low cooling rack might replace the foil? I have neither a DO nor a covered roaster but will now go searching. Or improvise! I sympathise with your starter woes .. try starting a starter in our summer temps here in Sth Australia .. currently hovering between 39-45C for days on end! Methinks I will wait for autumn perhaps! Sondra

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Thanks :)  I appreciate your comments.

As for the lid, I believe in my recipe above it says to bake with steam (lid on) for about 15 minutes, then without steam (lid off) for the rest of the bake.  I will double check to make sure included that instruction.

Roasters are much cheaper than dutch ovens.  I like your idea of a cooling rack.  I do have one but it doesn't fit in.  The other thing I am trying to do is get a baking bread/pizza stone, and then have it sanded down and shaped to fit inside the roaster.  The only thing wrong with this idea is how to have it not touch the water that I pour in.  That would most likely cause the stone to crack.  I will figure it out someday.  For now, I am happy with the outcome.

Good luck and let me know if you need any more info.

John

RobynNZ's picture
RobynNZ

John, I place bread directly on a stone (actually a kiln shelf, purchased from a manufacturer of kilns for ceramics), and top it for the first part of the bake with a roaster lid. I don't pre-heat the lid in the oven,  I spray inside the lid thoroughly with a fine mist of water just prior to slashing, load bread into oven and then add lid and have not had any problems with the stone cracking etc. I used to do as you do now (added water to the roaster) before I got the kiln shelf, but find I am very happy with oven spring, crust quality etc with the method I now use. I have occassionally forgotten to spray the lid and didn't really notice any difference, sufficient moisture from the loaf is trapped by the lid, but I continue to do it because it 'feels' right!

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Robyn.  Of course!  What was I thinking??  I knew the lid system over a stone works.  For heightier loaves I can even cover the dough with the roaster bottom as the lid is quite shallow.

I just have to get my hands on a good stone.  I read quite a few posts regarding unglazed quarry tile at Home Depot, but when I went in there and asked for it, they all looked at me like I was goofy.  Must not be stocked here in Vancouver.  I am in the construction industry so I plan on talking to a few stone and tile trades to see if they have any material they can spare that would work.

John

rcoplen's picture
rcoplen

VERY pretty bread!!! If it tastes as good as it looks, you've hit a homerun!

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Thanks rcoplen.  It turned out great and tasted very nice fresh and toasted.  The only thing I would change to the recipe is to do it with sourdough levain and not use commercial yeast.  This is a good recipe for a quick bake though.

John