The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Confused about how long to final proof after overnight rise

  • Pin It
barryvabeach's picture
barryvabeach

Confused about how long to final proof after overnight rise

I have been playing around with Ciabattas for a while - using a variation of Jason's recipe, and then started to go more towards a lower yeast, longer rise to get a better taste,  My current confusion is how long the final proof should be after the overnight rise.  When using the Jason method ( 2 teaspoons yeast for 500 grams flour )  I get a tripling in 2 to 3 hours, and the final proof is about half that time.  What has got me confused is that I have seen a few overnight room temp recipes for ciabatta that use much less yeast, and triple in about 12 hours .  At least one recipe then says, to form it, allow a final proof for one hour, then bake.  I am trying not to overthink it, but since I am using much less yeast, shouldn't the final proof time be longer?  I know the general advise is to "read" the dough, but I am not able to do that yet, especially with such a wet dough, and want to at least get some guidelines.   The last one I did using the overnight approach had tripled by the next morning, and was full of large and random holes.  I took it out of the container and let it rest for 10 minutes, then did one envelope fold to get the yeast to redistribute, let it proof for one hour and baked it. I got no oven spring, and it actually started to sink a little about halfway through the baking .  It didn't have the collapsed dome that I have seen when the hydration is too high, so I don't think that is the problem.  So I started again last night.  Again this morning the dough looked gorgeous - full of large holes-  I will try to wait 1 1/2 hours and see if that works any better - but am concerned that since I got sinking but no spring last time, that was more of a sign of overproofing, not underproofing.  Any suggestions would be welcome.  The recipe ( using home ground red winter wheat )  Flour 500 grams, water 470 ( 94%), Salt 15 (3%), yeast 3/4 tsp.     I didn't do a true no knead -  I autolysed the flour and water for a half hour, then mixed in the machine with salt and yeast for a few minutes.  then watied another half hour and did a stretch and fold.

Farmpride's picture
Farmpride

after reading your whole post, my first idea is your flour.... home ground will have less strength than a more comercial high protien flour, try your flour and half a nice bread flour.  With that sort of bread, being wet and warmer, try a shorter first rise, like 1 and a half hours, then form and pan, bake when ready, about double or so, there should be no need to proof overnight outside of a refridgerator....unless your home is real cold. also this type of bread is a flatter, wider loaf, so don't try to let it proof real high, that is also one reason it may have collapsed. now if you want the flavor of a long ferment, try a sponge mix.

 

albert, farmpride

Farmpride's picture
Farmpride

after reading your whole post, my first idea is your flour.... home ground will have less strength than a more comercial high protien flour, try your flour and half a nice bread flour.  With that sort of bread, being wet and warmer, try a shorter first rise, like 1 and a half hours, then form and pan, bake when ready, about double or so, there should be no need to proof overnight outside of a refridgerator....unless your home is real cold. also this type of bread is a flatter, wider loaf, so don't try to let it proof real high, that is also one reason it may have collapsed. now if you want the flavor of a long ferment, try a sponge mix.

 

albert, farmpride