The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

making recipies smaller

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matt_s09's picture
matt_s09

making recipies smaller

ok, so i have a recipie for oatmeal raisin bread. it makes three loaves but i only want one. its written in oz, tablespoons and cups. i was wondering if i just needed to devide by three to get what i need or if i should just suck it up and eat a lot of raisin bread?      

cranbo's picture
cranbo

Yeah, just divide by 3. 

As far as which measurement to use, hard to say. Going from oz to cups requires approximate conversion. On the other hand, don't know if original recipe was written in oz, and conversion could've gone the other way. 

bob13's picture
bob13

Could you make the "normal" size batch of dough and split it into 3 loaves, freeze two for baking later??  I am too new to bread making to know if this is possible or not, just a though.  But it could solve two issues, too much to eat at one time, and how to make a loaf if you don't have time to start from scratch.

clazar123's picture
clazar123

If you post the recipe, you may get a more concrete answer.

Definitely time for an experiment, even if you get a recipe from the first idea.

  1. First, get a notebook and write down the recipe.
  2. Re-write the recipe in thirds as you think it should be.
  3. Make the new recipe
  4. Do an analysis of the outcome and post back here, if more help is needed.
  5. Adjust hte recipe and try again.
  6. Tweak until you really like it and make it your final recipe.

The best way to learn about how to make bread is to use a methodical approach, as described.  You do have some failures but in the long run, each failure successfully teaches you either what to do or what NOT to do. It also teaches you about the characterisitcs of the ingredients. Try to keep things consistent-use the same brand flour,same measuring cups, go to measuring ingredients by weight,eventually. That way you can scale up or down with a recipe. There might be some occasions when you want to make 3,4,5 loaves and scaling is the way to do that.

Have delicious fun!

matt_s09's picture
matt_s09

im typing this on my phone so i have to write out the number.  so hang in there with me. thirty two oz  unbleached ap flour, five.three oz rolledoats soaked, twenty oz water, three.five oz milk, three tbsp honey, five and a half tbsp vegioil, one tbsp plus one tsp salt, one and a quarter tbsp dryactive yeast, two tbsp cinnamon, two cup soaked and drained raisins.                        ill  try it by just dividing it by three today. im sure it will be edible, hopefully.  thanks for answering, must sound like a stupid question but im on an extremely limited food budget and dont want to waste anything. 

kitcar's picture
kitcar

Dividing by 3 usually works fine, unless it calls for 1 egg! Then performing the division can get difficult I find :P

bob13's picture
bob13

I have good luck with scrambling the egg, weigh it, divide by what ever (in this case 3), and cook what's left over for breakfast.  I love to weight the ingridents as I find it easier to duplicate or alter for the next batch, and scale either up or down.

kitcar's picture
kitcar

Also, one other use for left over eggs is meringues! I used to make an egg bread recipe  that called for 3 eggs, yolks only - was having egg white omlettes for a while, but then realized I can also turn them into dessert! Yum!

matt_s09's picture
matt_s09

i wish my phone would let me post pictures on here. i turned out pretty good. i converted everything to oz and had to do a little adjusting. my scale reads out to two decimal points so it was fairly accurate. it probably could have fermented a bit longer before the bake, ill do that next time.  for an egg i would just scrmable it weigh it and use what ever i needed out of it i guess. anywho, my family has pretty much devoured all of it so ill call it a sucess.