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Maslin and Golden Flour Breads

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varda's picture
varda

Maslin and Golden Flour Breads

Recently Andy posted about some breads he baked with flours that his neighbors had brought him the Watermill on Little Salkeld.   One of the flours was Maslin described as a mix of wheat middlings and rye.    The Watermill used a bolting process which screened wheat into fine flour, middlings (described as a gray coarse flour) semolina, and bran.   My interest was piqued as I have just become fascinating with milling and sifting flour, so I decided to see if I could generate middlings from wheat berries and use it to create a Maslin flour loaf.   Andy posted very clear instructions which I followed as closely as possible altering only for differences in the flours and a retard to accommodate schedule.    I have not baked with flax seeds since I first started baking, and then just threw them into the bread without knowing that they benefited from a good soak.   Andy's formula included them (or linseed which I think is the British term) and thus so did mine.    My loaf had a great spring in the oven, and came out with a complex but subtle flavor that I think is a feature of combined rye and wheat breads, enhanced greatly by the flax seeds.   I may come to wish that I had easier access to this flour than hours of milling and sifting, as I would love to bake this loaf many times.   

It seems to me that this picture makes the bread look pretty dense but it really isn't.   I wouldn't even call it hearty.   The flavors are just too subtle.  

Of course middlings are supposed to be a byproduct of the milling process rather than the main event.    So as a result of screening out the middlings, I had a lot more of what I'll call Golden Flour.    This is the most refined flour I've been able to create with the technology at my disposal, and it is far from white, having a fair amount of very fine bran in it.    So I made a couple of loaves from that.   It has a lot of flavor, and is much more rustic than a white loaf despite the fineness of the flour.    I am guessing that this flour would be similar to the high extraction flour many people post about here.    Since I haven't tasted that, though, I can't be sure. 

 

Here are formulas and directions.

MASLIN LOAF

12/16/2012

     
      

Starter

     

Seed hydration

63%

    

KAAP

94%

    

Whole Rye

6%

    
      
  

5:00 PM

9:30 PM

  

Seed

40

    

KAAP

23

47

200

270

95%

Whole Rye

1

3

11

15

5%

Water

15

35

140

190

67%

    

476

11.6

Soaker 1

  

Soaker 2

  

Middlings

137

 

Flax seeds

30

 

Water

137

 

Water

90

 

Salt

4

    
      

12/17/2012

     
 

Final

Starter

Soaker

Total

Percent

KAAP

0

119

 

119

27%

Whole Rye

0

7

 

7

2%

Medium Rye

186

  

186

41%

Middlings

  

137

137

31%

Water

0

84

227

311

69%

Salt

4

 

4

8

1.8%

Flax seeds

  

30

30

7%

Starter

210

   

28%

    

798

178%

Starter factor

0.4

    
      

Make soakers at 5pm 12/16/2012

   

Water is cool from tap

    
      

Mix all at 8:30am (150g medium rye) - 5 minutes to incorporate

Then 10 minutes - speed 1 and 2

   

Add more Medium Rye to make dough cohere (36g)

 

Mix 8 more minutes

    

BF for two hours

    

Shape into fat batard, place in basket

  

with parchment sprinkled with bran across length (not sides)

and loaf floured

    

Place in refrigerator at 11:15

   

Remove at 3:30

    

Proof for 90 minutes

    

Place on peel, spritz, and slash

   

Bake at 450 for 20 minutes with steam

  

13 minutes without

    

 

GOLDEN LOAVES

 

Final

Starter

Total

Percent

KAAP

 

130

130

22%

Whole Rye

 

7

7

1%

Golden

460

 

460

77%

Water

315

92

407

68%

Salt

10

 

10

1.7%

Starter

230

  

23%

   

1015

170%

Starter factor

0.5

   
     
     
     

Starter from previous

   
     
     

Mix all ingredients for around 15 minutes speed 1 and 2

BF for 2.5 hours with 2 S&F on counter

 

Cut and preshape

   

Rest 15 minutes

   

Shape into batards

   

Place in refrigerator at 12:10

  

Remove at 3:40

   

Proof for 2 hours 20 minutes

  

Place on peel, spritz, and slash

  

Bake at 450 for 20 minutes with steam

 

14 minutes without

   

I decided to soak the middlings overnight, as they had been quite coarse in another bread.   This seemed to soften them up a bit.   I was going to do half and half middings and medium rye, but my milling and sifting process didn't cooperate so I used slightly more medium rye.    When I started mixing the dough came together immediately, but them fell apart completely and just stuck to the edges of the bowl.   After trying to pull it together, I finally added some more medium rye, which did the trick.  

Here are my milling and sifting notes:

Mill coarse, Sift in #24

 

Mill leavings coarse, sift in #24

Mill leavings medium, sift in #24

Mill leavings fine, sift in #24

Remove leavings which are bran

Sift flour in #30

 

Remove leavings which are bran

Sift flour in #55

 

Mill leavings at medium

 

Sift in #55

 

Mill leavings at medium fine

Sift in #55

 

Mill leavings at fine

 

Sift in #55

 

Leavings are Middlings

 

Sifted flour is Golden

 
   

Berries

670

 

Golden

460

69%

Middlings

137

20%

Bran

51

8%

Loss

22

3%

I am guessing that my middlings are probably quite different than Watermill middlings.   I am unable to separate middlings and semolina and don't think I want to because then my quantities would be too small.    The term middlings, however, doesn't seem to be terribly precise:   see here.   So I am thinking I'm within my rights to call it such.    I was quite surprised to see that middlings are looked down on as a food source even though that's where the nutrients are.    The article says that they are being considered as a source of bio-fuels, because of course it's better to put the nutrients in our cars than our bodies.  

Comments

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

baking in every way.  I love the crust on your bread with the tanm brownm and darker flecks of what ever it is.  The crumb is to die for as well.  Now I'm torn as to which I like better your Dark Chocolate Rye or these.  I like them all.......Just great baking.  If these don't taste excellent then there are no bread gods ....or possibly any other kind either.

Happy Hanukkah Varda!

varda's picture
varda

Thanks so much, DA.   The chocolate Borodinsky is just another story entirely.   Thank goodness we can enjoy eating many breads.   I really do love the flavor of the Maslin Loaf.   I was almost taken aback when I bit into it, as the loaves I made earlier with similar flour just weren't that good.     Thanks for the holiday wishes.   My son was particularly sad when the last night of Hanukkah rolled around on Saturday.   Only 362 days left until Hanukkah.   I hope you had a good one as well.  -Varda

bakingbadly's picture
bakingbadly

Beautiful loaves, Varda! I'm quite fond of flax seeds so I'm particularly drawn to your maslin loaf---looks absolutely delicious.

Despite that I don't own a mill, it was a pleasure reading your post. Your enthusiasm and dedication to milling and sifting is something to be admired. I swear, one day when I purchase myself a mill (with access to grains), I'll certainly look back at your posts as references and motivation. 

Take care and happy holidays,

Zita 

varda's picture
varda

that I get frustrated when people post on baking with flours that I don't have access to and so forth, and now perhaps I am the guilty one.   But what is impossible one day becomes possible the next.   Thanks so much for your comments.   Happy holidays to you.  -Varda

Franko's picture
Franko

Hi Varda,

Wonderful looking loaves, with a very appealing crumb and crust on both of them.

Having followed and enjoyed your adventures in milling since you began them, I'm now starting to wonder if I'm too lazy to own and make the best use of a milling machine. I already spend a good deal of free time baking and cooking, so I'm not sure I have enough of it left to justify having having my own flour mill while I'm still working full time. Still, the idea of working with freshly milled flour holds a lot of appeal for me and will give the matter some more thought before I decide one way or the other. Thanks Varda!, for taking the time to write up this excellent series of posts on your home milling experiences.

Best Wishes,

Franko 

varda's picture
varda

Don't let my obsessiveness enthusiasm scare you away.    There are many, many people who use mills productively yet less energetically than I have been doing lately.   And I'm sure I'll be one of them as soon as this wave crests.   (I'm only on my 5th post here - probably at least a few more coming.)  I seriously doubt you are lazy given the beautiful breads and other cooking you post about regularly.   But no matter; you'll figure out if milling makes sense for you.   Thanks so much for your very kind words.   -Varda

proth5's picture
proth5

I almost as elaborate as my own.  I've got some professional milling books waiting for me at home, and with luck will use some of my holiday "at home" time to do study, refection, and (natch) milling.  Stay tuned.

Nice stuff.

Pat

varda's picture
varda

to know what you find out and hope to see some great posts.   Thank you for commenting and hope you have a happy holiday.  -Varda

Toad.de.b's picture
Toad.de.b

Your batard's crumb reminds me hansjoakim's in his famous posting of Hamelman Pain au Levain w/Whole Wheat (famous because JH himself -- presumably -- commented).  Both his and your batard have five-star crumbs (and yours - six star shape, if such a thing is possible).  (My) ideal crumb in air and wheatiness. 

I'm hoping to find some milling/sieving time over the holidays as well.  Baking for sure, but the other fun stuff...hopefully.

Have a good one!

Tom

varda's picture
varda

too kind.   I had never seen this post, and didn't know that Mr. Hamelman had ever posted on this forum.   That's like a Michelin star.   It seems to me that my crumb is completely different.   I have never been able to get a crumb that looks like Hans' despite my efforts.   This one has a sort of glassy sheen to it, which is what I get instead when I don't screw up.    Hope you have a wonderful holiday with just the right amount of milling and sieving.   Thanks so much for your comments.  -Varda

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Excellent results, varda! i love their looks, very appealing! The ear on the batard is something to aspire to. Well done.

That is one extensive milling regime, Varda! i admire your presistance with this labir intensive work. However, an easier way to go about it in my opinion, is to try and get rid of the larger bran after 2 (3 if needed)successive coarse millings. What i do, is i sift ( after the coarse millings) in a high mesh strainer (i use a splash screen), to filter through the fine bran/flour that resulted from the coarse milling, afterwhich you will be left with semolina, and large bran only. From then on, it would easier to separate the larger bran through an appropriately sized strainer. The end result will be coarse semolina with very few white middlings. Milling the semolina ( which would still contain some fiber) will result in a really smooth branless flour. I say this, as i don't wish to see you laboring under a milling regime so extensive, that would drain your power and passion.

Khalid

varda's picture
varda

you weighed in Khalid.   And thank you for your comments on the bread.   

As for the milling regime, I was obviously not worried about efficiency here, just about getting the flour I wanted.    I am not sure I understand all of what you are saying about how you do it.    So let me see if I get it.    It seems that the greatest time saver in what you are saying is to do multiple millings and one sift to get the large bran out, while I alternated between milling and sifting.   The reason (if there really was a reason) that I alternated is because milling heats the flour, so I figured if I sifted after each milling that I would reduce the amount of fine flour that I was sending through the mill more than once.   I don't know if that makes sense or not.    I could certainly skip the 24 strainer altogether, as it let through some of the bran that the 30 strainer pulled out.   I do have a splatter screen that is finer than the 30 strainer but I find it difficult to use without getting flour all over the place since it has no sides.   I am completely unclear about what you are saying about separating the fine flour from the middlings/semolina.   I did this by using a 55 sieve which is very tight.   It took forever and multiple millings to get enough of the fine flour out.    Perhaps I could just to a fine milling up front instead of the successive millings that I ended up doing.    That might make a big difference in efficiency.   But I'm not sure if that's what you are saying or not.   Hope you are doing well.   Wish you could visit and show me exactly how you do this.  

-Varda

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Hi, Varda 

While i'm sure that you are separating enough bran from your kernels, using your milling regime is time consuming, and you'll have more bran being crushed into dust which end up in your fine flour. No problem with fine fiber in your end result, don't get me wrong, but you'd want to exclude the larger bran ( the ones surrounding the wheat kernel) as much as you can during the early part of the milling, and start milling fine and sifting later on. what i do, is grind the kernels quite coarsly, and refrigerate them until the day i plan to mill/sift, which helps in preparing the cracked kernels ahead of time, and minimizing the overheating during later stages.

On the day of milling/sifting, i take out the cracked kernels and mill them coarsly twice, this is stage 1. At the end of stage 1, what i'll have on hand is a mix of large bran flecks, coarse semolina, and fine semolina/ bran; the latter is what you have to get rid of at stage 2. On stage 2, Sift  the proceeds from stage one using a medium fine mesh. At the end of stage 2 what you end with is coarse mixture of cracked grain and large bran. At stage 3, i would mill my mixture to medium fine with a single pass, and sift out the larger bran -This is the most crucial stage were the large bran is extracted. At Stage 4, i will have coarse, and fine semolina with soft fiber intact, which is what you need in the end product, sift the mixture and mill on fine for  the last time.

I hope this helps, Varda :)

Khalid

 

 

varda's picture
varda

Hi Khalid,   I will try this.   I am particularly interested in your stages 1 and 2.   Not 100% sure of 3 and 4 but I'll see what I can work into my process to get the flour I want more efficiently.   Thanks so much!  -Varda

FlourChild's picture
FlourChild

Varda, gorgeous breads, especially love the crumb shots.  I'm thoroughly enjoying following your obsession enthusiasm, so glad you posted.  You just might inspire me to get a mill myself, have been contemplating it ever since the time I used my heavy-duty blender to grind fresh whole wheat flour, which made one of the tastiest walnut loaves I've ever baked.

Hope you all enjoyed the holidays!

Julie

varda's picture
varda

if you continue to find my posts interesting :-)    Thanks so much for your comments, and I hope there is a mill in your future before too long.   Happy Holidays.  -Varda

ananda's picture
ananda

Hello Varda,

A lovely Maslin loaf, and really good to see you post on breads produced using experimental methods of sieving flour.

E J T Collins wrote "Dietary Change in Britain in the 19th Century" which demonstrates the shift from consuming cereals grown locally to a greater consumption of wheat throughout Britain.   For instance in the North of England, where I live, and where the Watermill is located, the conditions are less than ideal for growing wheat, and rye was the dominant 19th Century cereal.   So, in the North, a Maslin flour would have a bias to rye, similar to the ratio you chose, I suspect.   However, the South East of England is more suited to wheat, and that was the most common arable crop in this time period as well as it still is today.

For flax seeds, I use "Organic Golden Linseed", which looks like this:

http://www.google.co.uk/imgres?q=organic+golden+linseed&hl=en&tbo=d&biw=1161&bih=479&tbm=isch&tbnid=oM5iJnqZH96mrM:&imgrefurl=http://www.buywholefoods...

Middlings are the very outer layers of the endosperm.   Lack of precision is a fair comment, but remember that bolting flour was the milling method used before the precision of roller-milling was adopted during the Industrial Revloution.

Very best wishes

Andy

varda's picture
varda

I know you are in the middle of the holiday rush and appreciate you taking the time to comment.   Your point on  middlings is well taken.   I would love to see the operation at the watermill but that will have to wait for another day.  Good baking and happy holidays.   -Varda