The Fresh Loaf

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Multigrain SD / YW Porter Bread with Roasted Onions, Sprouts, Malts and Seeds

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dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Multigrain SD / YW Porter Bread with Roasted Onions, Sprouts, Malts and Seeds

The last two bakes were a lower and then a higher percentage of whole grains  and more complex that this one at 48% whole grains.   We also used the KA mixer on speed 3 to knead the dough for 8 minutes instead of using French slap and folds and we baked the bread in a DO instead of on a stone with steam.

 

The rye sour and YW combo levain consisted of dark whole rye and water that was built over 10 hours with (2) 1 hour stages and one of 8 hours. After the levain had doubled we refrigerated it for 12 hours and then let it come to room temperature the next day for 2 hours as we autolysed the flours.

  

The AP, spelt, whole wheat, rye, potato flakes, oat flour ground flax seeds, baked potato, malts and Toady Tom’s Toasted Tidbits were autolysed with the Baltika #6 Porter and home made red wine vinegar for 2 hours before combining with the salt and the levain in the KA for kneading.

  

The dough was rested for 20 minutes and then 4 sets of S&F’s were done on 20 minute intervals.  The caraway and coriander seeds along with a new ingredient; caraway leaves and roasted re=hydrated onions were incorporated on the 3rd set.

 

The rye, spelt and ww sprout chits were incorporated on the 4th set.  Don’t forget to start your ww sprouts 48 hours ahead and the rye and spelt seeds 24 hours ahead to make sure they all chit together and are ready when needed.  Also take the 1 T of dried onions and roast them for a couple of minutes at 350 F to get them dark, not burned like I did the first time,  and then re-hydrate them in 3 T of water 4 hours ahead of time.

 

After the 4th set of S&f’S the dough was allowed to develop and ferment for 1 hour before being pre shaped and shaped into a boule and placed into a rice floured basket inside a trash can liner where it was allowed to ferment for another hour before being retarded for 8 hours in the fridge.

 

The dough was then allowed to come to room temperature and ferment and develop some more on the counter the next day for 6 hours since the temperature in the kitchen is only 67 F. 

 

The oven was preheated to 450 F.  The basket was upended into the cold DO, poorly scored (can’t seem to ever do it right in a DO), and placed into the hot oven that was immediately turned down to 425 F where the bread steamed itself for 25minutes.  Then the lid was removed and the bread baked for another 20 minutes.

  

10 minutes after the lid came off the bread was removed from the DO and continued to bake directly on the oven rack.  The bread was also rotated 180 degrees every 5 minutes until it reached 205 F on the inside.  The bread was allowed to crisp on the oven rack for 10 minutes with the oven off and door ajar before being moved to the cooling rack.  It sure smells tasty.

 

The crumb came out open and moist with a great chew due to the sprouts.  The taste was very good.  Instead of the dominate onion taste like last time, we had a caraway flavor that came through due to the caraway leaves and not the caraway seeds.  This is what Americans would call rye bread even though rye only makes up about 27% of the flours used in the bread.  We really like the way this bread tastes.  It is complex and earthy.  The combination of whole rye being twice as much as whole spelt and WW and the whole grains making up 50% of the flours is one we like very much.  The YW and SD levain combination also helps to lighten the crumb and open it up thanks to the YW while still getting a SD taste to come through too.

Formula

Mixed Starter

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

SD Starter

10

0

0

10

1.75%

Yeast Water

0

60

0

60

13.73%

Dark Rye

30

60

40

130

29.75%

Water

30

0

40

70

16.02%

Total Starter

70

120

80

270

61.78%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Starter

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

23.62%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

Spelt

42

9.61%

 

 

 

WW

42

9.61%

 

 

 

Dark Rye

34

7.78%

 

 

 

Toady Tom's Toasted Tidbits

10

2.29%

 

 

 

Red Malt

2

0.46%

 

 

 

White Malt

2

0.46%

 

 

 

Potato Flakes

10

2.29%

 

 

 

Ground Flax Seed

10

2.29%

 

 

 

Oat Flour

10

2.29%

 

 

 

AP

275

62.93%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

437

100.00%

 

 

 

Salt

9

2.06%

1.67% total weight of flour

Baltika Porter

290

66.36%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

66.36%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

572

 

 

 

 

Porter 290 & Water

425

 

 

 

 

Total Dough Hydration

74.30%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

76.92%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,193

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whole Grains

48.43%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sprouts

 

%

 

 

 

WW

15

3.43%

 

 

 

Rye

30

6.86%

 

 

 

Spelt

15

3.43%

 

 

 

Total Sprouts

60

13.73%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Barley Malt

10

2.29%

 

 

 

Caraway and Coriander

12

2.75%

 

 

 

Total

32

7.32%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1 tsp Dried Minced Onion - Baked

 

 

 

 

Brown @ 350 F, Re-hydrated & Drained

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1/2 tsp Caraway Leaves

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

50g of Baked Potato with Skin - included in weights

 

 

 

Comments

varda's picture
varda

awfully short ingredient list, DA.   Mellowing?   I am wondering what your percentages are in the starter data block.   61.78% of what?   In spite of the fact that I know you eat other things than bread, I'm guessing you could meet your total nutrition needs with this loaf alone.    I took a page from your book yesterday and bought a cheap, lined (yea!) basket at Michael's.   It was not meant for bread, but it will be used for that.    My basket collection is probably a tenth of yours at this point.   The one above looks great and gives a nice pattern to the bread.  -Varda

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

mellowing as the shot of my assistant clearly shows.  It must be a Holiday thing.  The 61.78% is the weight of the levain divided by the weight of the dough flour.  Every percent is the weight divided by dough flour.  I don't know if this is right for a bakers %  or not - but that is what it is.  

Pretty soon I will have you basket shopping at Goodwill and supporting one of my favorite charities, like Frasier House and Wounded Warriors.  Goodwill actually trains needy folks to work various jobs and also supplies many jobs as well - quite unlike most charities that help folks other ways. What is funny is that when I find a basket at Goodwill with a liner that isn't sown in - I take it out so the basket can leave its mark on the dough - plus unlined baskets cost 50 cents less and I am a thrifty shopper no matter what. 

I really have a thing for bread proofing baskets and DO's too.  It is an illness but not as bad as some others I've managed to recover from over the years :-)

Glad you liked the bread.  It is healthy and delicious too!

Happy Hanukkah Varda!

varda's picture
varda

to teach baker's math, as I'm a raggedy self-taught sort.    But the number I care about is percent of prefermented flour.    So this is the weight of flour in your starter over weight of total flour in your formula.   I have been shooting for a number between 20 and 25% lately.   This number tells you quite a bit, and if you change it (I think Hamelman is typically in the 15% range) it changes the character of your bread.   I'm not sure what weight of starter over weight of flour tells you.   My personal opinion is not much.     So it seems to me the four most important numbers are hydration of total dough, hydration of starter, percent prefermented flour, and inasmuch as it matters to you, percent whole grains of total flour.   Just my 2 cents and worth every penny.   -Varda

gmagmabaking2's picture
gmagmabaking2

beautiful bread DA... but when is it not! Great looking loaf... and as Varda said... looks like a meal in and of itself... thanks Varda for the mention of Michael's for the lined basket, I have been wanting to use one... but never thought of getting on there for that purpose... 

Again, great job, I am always amazed by the creative ingredient list you come up with..... Me, I just read recipes and try to follow them... I MUST RELEASE MY INNER CHILD!!! Those who knew me as a child are now shuddering at the thought! 

You create some serious bread.

Happy Creative Baking, Diane

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

problem I need to CONTAIN MY INNER CHILD!!!  But luckily, men never really get older than 8 no matter how old they are.  I think my design background forces me to  dream up and try new new things, or possibly, it is the evil spirits and zombies that take over my apprentice now and again if I don't pay close attention to her every boo-ba-bay!

The great thing about this bake was finding out how great caraway leaves are for baking into bread.   Amazing what you can find in the Indian aisle at the Chinese grocery store :-)

Glad you liked the bread and thank you for your comments Diane.  You gals have been baking up a Holiday Storm!

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Lovely (and confusing ;)) confluence of flavors, DA :) .. I'm sure it would tast great with all the healthy goodies in there.

Khalid

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

good tasting bread once you get past the confusion  :-)  Very healthy and a real multi-grain.  I don't know why, but potatos and oats really do wonders for the flavor and rise of these kinds of bread.

Next time I'm not going to slash it until it has been under the steaming lid of the DO for 15 minutes to see if it can rise up a little and make the slashing a little easier.

Keep up the mending Khalid and thanks for commenting.

bakingbadly's picture
bakingbadly

Whoa...  I'd sure like a bite of that. No, not a bite. Perhaps eat the entirety but I know that won't be possible. Looks very hearty and filling---yum, yum!

As always, a superb bake.

Zita

P.S. I look forward to the crumb shot. :) 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

This is a fun bread to make.  One that isn't all that difficult and the rewards you get taste wise are worth the little effort - No French slap and folds and no funny business with cocoa and instant coffee to get the color:-)  Toasted with butter, plain or even with a little pate and this bread really shines.  Can't wait for a lunch sandwich of some kind.

Glad you liked it Zita and I am looking forward to your next bake.

isand66's picture
isand66

Another great combination of ingredients and techniques DA.  I await your triumphant crumb shot!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I almost put some cream cheese in so I wouldn't have put a schmear on this bread when toasted.  There isn't too much fluff in this bread for color and the tastes that remain really come through.  I think this would make a fine multi-grain bagel dough too.  Haven't baked in a DO for a while and that was fun and much easier too.

I saw you posted another bake that I will look at next.

Happy Hanukkah to you and yours Ian!

isand66's picture
isand66

Beautiful and perfect crumb shot.  I see your apprentice was pooped out after working so much to get this one right!

Great bake DA!

Happy Holidays to you and your family.

Ian