The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Keeping Oatmeal Bread moist

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cwpullyard's picture
cwpullyard

Keeping Oatmeal Bread moist

I have a wonderful recipe for oatmeal rolls/bread, and it tastes great right after baking and for a day.  By the next day it is dry, works well for toast, but a regular sandwich needs LOTS of mayo, mustard etc.   HELP if you have any tips to keep it more moist....thanks!

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

and hold back a little on the liquids in the recipe until you see how the dough mixes.  I find cooked oatmeal gives a moister crumb than adding dry oats which tend to soak up too much of the dough's moisture.   Or cook part of the oats.  Or soak and drain the oats first before mixing into the dough.    Try it and see.

cwpullyard's picture
cwpullyard

thanks for the comments.  The oatmeal does get soaked for 10 minutes before mixing, but I think I will try draining it and adding new liquid back at the original level.  will let you know how it goes!  thanks again

richkaimd's picture
richkaimd

There are lots of reasons why your bread may be staling so quickly.  For example, might you be keeping it at or around 40 degrees?  That temperature is ideal for speeding up staling.  Curiously, that's a common temperature for your refrigerator.  Maybe you are baking it a bit too long?  Do you measure the internal temperature of your breads to determine when to take them out?  I take mine out 195-200 degrees when I'm baking low-hydration loaves.  That's just a start.  While you're tweaking your recipe, I suggest that you allow your loaves to cool, slice them, and then freeze the slices in a good quality tightly sealed freezer bag.  Take out only the slices you plan to use, letting them sit at room temperature or toasting them immediately.

cwpullyard's picture
cwpullyard

thank you for the comments.  I usually keep my breads wrapped up, on the counter in a old style metal bread box.  I have not measured the internal temp, but have started taking it out 5-7 minutes before/shorter than the "suggested" baking time.  Will try the slice and freeze advice, that sounds like a good option too.  FYI - the oats does get soaked for 10 minutes before mixing with other ingredients...

PaddyL's picture
PaddyL

I always soak the oatmeal before using it.  I know it's tempting to use more flour when you're making oatmeal bread, but any dough with oats is going to feel tackier than plain dough.

cwpullyard's picture
cwpullyard

the oats does get soaked 10 minutes before mixing with other ingredients.   I will try soaking, draining and re-adding the original amount of liquid as another person suggested.  And I will try leaving out some of the other flours, when I use all white it seems better,  but I do like to use some whole wheat flours...thanks for the help.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

and you can also soak the oats and the whole flours together in the liquid (I still think you may need more water in the recipe) for several hours before mixing.  Add water to achieve the same consistency dough that you like.  Whole flours tend to also soak up more moisture.  The dry oatmeal bread could be avoided by adding more liquids to the dough.  

Another thought:  Chilling or storing the loaf in the refrigerator causes premature staling and the crumb will both feel and taste dryer.  Toasting can help.  Don't store in the fridge if you can help it.