The Fresh Loaf

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Deli Owner - Par baked vs buying baked daily

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mv5882's picture
mv5882

Deli Owner - Par baked vs buying baked daily

Hello everyone.  I own an Italian deli in New Jersey and am considering using par baked subs vs buying baked bread and having them delivered every morning.  In my current situation, I purchase bread from a local bakery and they deliver every morning.  I typically receive 20 dozen rolls a day for sandwiches and an assortment of loaves.  My two main issues with this is...  One, freshness of the bread.  By the time I receive the bread in the morning, the bread is atleast 6 hours old.  By late in the day, the bread is beginning to get hard.  This is a problem considering there is a Subway up the street baking fresh bread all day long.  Number two, is waste.  It is impossible to predict volume on a day to day basis and i am almost always left with bread left over.  After doing some research I came up with par baked bread as an alternative.  What are the pros and cons of par baked vs my current situation?  Do par baked rolls cost more?  I am aware that energy costs will increase with the use of an oven.  What would you do if you were me?

Thank you all for any advice and help on this topic.

 

- Michael

grind's picture
grind

Hi Michael, I think par baked bread is a great idea for all of the reasons you stated.  I know that the La Brea Bakery do a 90% (there abouts) par bake frozen baguette and it's pretty decent.  10 minutes (or less) and it's done!  They may do other styles as well -  ciabatta rings a bell.   Costco Canada carries them out on the west coast, not sure about Jersey and surrounding area.  Easy to locate, I'm sure.  Good luck.

Farmpride's picture
Farmpride

par baked is fine,  first are you there all day to do this? do you have help that is going to be attentive? are you going to have to buy an oven?..and lastly, i would hope that you give your present supplier the opportunity to do the product for you , he has been good for you to this point right? work with him, it may be a product line he does not currantly do, and may have a few problems,..but as a retailer myself, i pray you give your present guy a chance, and may open doors for him as well as you.

 

albert, farmpride.

Born2Bake's picture
Born2Bake

Give him a chane first to make what you need

grind's picture
grind

Those are good points.  The current baker can probably make the par baked bread.  How silly of me to miss that.

Farmpride's picture
Farmpride

i will guess that the bread you get from the baker is like french bread or actual baguette, if so look at the bread the subway uses,..that is what a majority of customers want, soft bread.  so now you may want to consider offering you customers a softer bread, could be as well as what you now have, offer both, so, what i would do is get a small oven and do the par baked product, and keep the other also, giving each one a unique name.  then your customers have a choice, which they do not have a the sub shop. it may be you will do better offering a choice even though your customers only use one, they will feel better having the choice....

albert/farmpride.com

mcannistra's picture
mcannistra

I know I am coming late to this party but space/storage is a large consideration. Many large bakeries can help you with par-baked solutions but the next question you should ask yourself is will the par-baked breads come fresh or frozen? 240 rolls does not seem a lot but you will need to store par-baked bread somewhere, unless you are receiving it daily. Gonnella Bread out of Chicago does a great job with frozen dough, all shapes and sizes and many varieties of sandwich breads. Turano Bread in Chicago has many par-baked brown and serve options as well.