The Fresh Loaf

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SD Stuffing Bread

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dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

SD Stuffing Bread

Thanks goes out to John01473bwho found the errors the formula spreadsheet and the one for Poolish Stuffing Bread too.  Nice catching John!

Originally we were going to make some soup bowls for the squash soup our daughter requested when she comes home today from college.  But, we just wouldn’t eat that much bread at one time and it would go to waste once it got soggy.

  

So we decided to make some whitish SD bread that we can use to make Thanksgiving stuffing for the really big chicken we plan to have for dinner on Thursday.

 

The whole grains were rye, spelt and whole wheat and the toasted bits, which we like very much, were inspired by Toady Tom’s.  These were a combination of the extraction from some white whole wheat we sifted out in a moment of insanity, some wheat germ and some oat bran.

  

The levain was built from 1 g of rye sour and Desem starter that was allowed to double over 12 hours.  The only weird thing we did for this bake was to use toasted coconut juice for the liquid in the dough.  It has 14 g of sugar in it according to the label but we ate the toasted coconut part and just used the juice.

  

Since our standard dressing has everything in it but the kitchen sink, a surprise to many of you I’m sure and goes against our Spartan outlook, we though a sweet coconut bread would go well with the dried fruits in the stuffing mix.

 

This bread has followed our recent trend of long slow levain build at room temperature using 1 g of starter.  A 2 hour autolyse the with the dough flours, liquid and salt is included before a quick mix of autolyse and levain with a spoon, 10 minutes of French slap and folds followed by 3 sets of S&F’s on 30 minute intervals.

 

We then shaped the dough into a boule and rice flour basketed the dough for a 90 minute of proofing / ferment at room temperature in a nearly new trash can liner before 12 hours of cold ferment in the 36 F fridge. 

 

Out of the fridge it came to be allowed to ferment some more at room temperature for 3 hours before being un-molded, slashed with Ian’s signature T-Tex moniker and into the 500 F mini oven it went with 2 of Sylvia’s steaming Pyrex cups heated in the microwave.

 

After 2minutes we turned the temperature down to 450 F and continued to steam for 12 minutes total.  The boule sprang and blistered nicely as the mini + steam is prone to put on bread.  We then removed the steaming cups and  baked at 425 F, convection this time, for 15 minutes turning the boule 120 degrees every 5minutes.

 

5 minutes after the steam came out, we turned the boule over on its top for 5 minutes to make sure the bottom got nicely browned too.  At a total baking time of 27 minutes, the internal temperature hit 205 F.  We shut down the heat, left the door ajar and the boule in the mini to crisp the crust a little further.  After 10 minutes we took the bread out to cool on a cooling rack.

 

It sure smells good but we will let it rest before cutting it open and see what it looks like.  Its cu now and we have the nice open crumb we get with this process.  Nice and glossy crumb that is moist and flecked with toasted bits.  It tastes delicious too.  A very nice bread that when combined with some poolish white and somce SD dark should make for a nice stuffing with variety and color - just like the lunches we like..

 

Formula

 

SD Starter

Build 1

%

SD Desem & Rye Sour

1

0.20%

Dark Rye

10

2.51%

AP

50

12.56%

Toated Bits

10

2.51%

Spelt

10

2.51%

Whole Wheat

10

2.51%

Water

70

17.59%

Total Starter

161

40.45%

 

 

 

Starter Totals

 

 

Hydration

77.70%

 

Levain % of Total

19.26%

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

Bread Flour

170

42.71%

Whole Spelt

16

4.02%

Dark Rye

16

4.02%

White Whole Wheat

16

4.02%

Toasted Bits

10

2.51%

AP

170

42.71%

Dough Flour

398

100.00%

 Salt

 8

2.01% 

T. Coconut Juice & Water 70

268

67.34%

Dough Hydration

67.34%

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

488.6

 

T. Coconut Juice & Water 70

338.4

 

T. Dough Hydration

69.26

 

Whole Grain %

20.57%

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

68.98%

 

Total Weight

837

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

Red Multi-grain Malt

1

0.25%

White Multi-grain Malt

1

0.25%

Total

2

0.50%

Comments

Floydm's picture
Floydm

What a beauty!  It seems like a shame to shred a loaf that nice up for stuffing, but I'm sure it'll be excellent that way too!

-Floyd

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

going to make some non sour croutons too ......so that the stuffing isn't too sour and we can eat some of this bread instead :-)  When I tasted this bread.... it was almost too good for stuffing  - but not quite.  Glad you like it Floyd.  We love Ian's T-Rex fancy do slash.

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Nicely done dabrownman!  Perfect shaping and evenly browned crust.  I love making my own stuffing/dressing, but have not yet made my own bread for it - I just started making bread a few months ago.

If I use sourdough bread crutons for the stuffing/dressing, I like to use sweet ingredients to off set the sour that may or may not come through.  Eg. Dried fruits (apple, apricot, pear, raisins, etc.), sweet nuts such as chestnuts, toasted pinenuts, sweet pork sausage.

Good luck and great baking :)

John

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

the way.   Our stuffing this year is 4 breads; Corn, SD 20% Whole Grain, SD 60% Whole Grain with Cocoa and coffee and a Poolish White bread that is not sour around 75% hydration (will make that tomorrow as the poolish won't be ripe till 5 PM tonight and it needs 12 hours in the fridge after that), all the dried fruits; sultanas, prunes, raisins, cranberries, caramelized; onions, celery and mushrooms, home made stock, walnuts and pumpkin seeds, fresh herbs and some sage smoked sausage.

I'ts way better than the turkey that is stuffed with it. As a note, many folks like me until yesterday did not know that poolish was invented and first used in Poland by Jewish bakers trying to bake something besides SD - they were sick and tired of sour after thousands of year of it :-)

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Sounds like my kind of stuffing man...I want Thanksgiving again!  Oh ya Xmas is around the corner.

John

 

Emelye's picture
Emelye

I use a loaf made with a verion of this formula: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/recipes/potatorosemaryrolls to make my Thanksgiving stuffing.  Its built in flavor and the fact that it's a straight dough make it ideal for me.  I just make sure to remember the sage and rosemary that's already there when I flavor the stuffing itself.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

to put the herbs in the dough!  Maybe I'll remember for the poolih bread. 

Floria's picture
Floria

Nicely done. That's perfection!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

you like the bread.  It is preety tasty as wel - it's best attritubute.  The toasted coconut juice hit the spot.   Welcome to TFL and I can't wait to see your next bake!

varda's picture
varda

Your bread looks fabulous.  I am going to make cornbread for stuffing this year - a bit simpler.    Your scoring looks great.    What tool are you using?   -Varda

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

on my single edge razor blade that couldn't score squat and went to a Henckels paring knife about 3 weeks ago,  my scoring instantly improved 100 % .   Glad you like the bread and the scoring for once :-)

BurntMyFingers's picture
BurntMyFingers

I'm using up leftover bread for my stuffing this year but I've had good results baking sage and thyme (the "poultry seasoning" spices) right into the bread. Anyway, yours looks great. Happy big chicken day!
Otis

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

left overs too but they rarely have sage, rosemary and thyme in them,   But tomorrow's poolish bread will!    \

Thanks and.....Happy Really Big Chicken Day to you too Otis. 

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hi dabrownman,
Hope you have a very Happy Thanksgiving and a lovely dinner, with your 'really big chicken' and multi-bread stuffing :^)
This bread is quite beautiful, with the pattern left by the basket, and the scoring; the toasted coconut sounds good, too.
Can you taste much sweetness/toasted coconut flavor? (was curious how much came through in the flavor, after baking)
:^) breadsong

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I didn't read the label of the coconut juice until after I dumped it in and saw it had 14 g of sugar in it which was about 3.5% BP.  So the sweetness really did come through but it wasn't overpowering or taste wrong - it was more subtle but definitely there,  The coconut taste was lost though.  Coconut water would be better if you don't want the sweet or the coconut flavor :-).

The Henckel's paring knife and the 50 cent Goodwill basket made a fine combo for bread bling on this boule.   The razor blade was a real problem for me, plus this bread didn't have a ton of add ins that get in the way of a good slash like many of my breads do.

Thanks for your kind words and have a Happy Thanksgiving with family and friends.

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Mr. D and Apprentice,

Very nice loaf indeed.  As others have said - the scoring looks great!  Yeah, I find serrated paring knives work a whole lot better than razor blades too....I tried double edge, single edge - lames that were curved and lames that were straight....but the $4.00 serrated knives from the local restaurant supply store are the things I reach for the most often.

You said this used toasted coconut water.  How on earth do you 'toast' coconut water?  If I tried toasting coconut water I would end up shorting out our electrical box :-O.  I now use coconut oil in most of my breads instead of butter.  Nobody can tell a difference and, if one believes what one reads, it is supposed to be better for you than butter.  I even give it to my dogs and they love it :-)

Thanks for the post.  Enjoy your time with your daughter.  Ours comes home tomorrow and I am glad the weather will be clear as she is driving across Kansas which can be a sheet of ice at times this time of year.  Her request was for Pat's (proth5) sourdough waffles!

Take Care,

Janet

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

to drive safe.  Mine got caught in the backup of a huge wreck, involving a bus where people died, on I-10 that shut down the entire interstate for hours.   It took her twice as long to get home as normal taking the back roads.   She was hungry and wolfed the soup that had croutons made from this bread on it.

I didn't see anything toasted in the juice and it didn't taste toasted but we figured it had to be the bit of coconut floating in the juice.  It was a choice of coconut water or toasted coconut juice and we jumped at the toasted.  I figure it' all Ian's fault anyway since I saw his recipe that has some kind of coconut liquid in it - just trying to keep up with the Ian's.    I still haven't given coconut oil a try yet and don't use much fat in breads anyway.

My wife went to KU is that where your daughter goes to college?  Odd what they ask for food wise sometimes.  My daughter actually made Thai Green Curry chicken from memory for her boyfriend this week and was so proud of herself she sent me a photo of it - and she only forgot 4 ingredients - better than me!!

Enjoy Thanksgiving  with your family and thanks for your comments.

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Mr. D,

Glad to know your daughter arrived safely and knew which back roads to travel on.

Mine made it.  Clear roads and no hitches.  Got here.  Grabbed something to eat - a kiwi - changed her clothes then out shopping with a friend.....Her social schedule is packed.  I think she penciled 'family' time in somewhere....

Husband went to KU.  Daughter is going to a small private college.  Mom likes small :-)

Enjoy your family over the weekend too... :-)

Janet

bakingbadly's picture
bakingbadly

Wow... A lot of good looking loaves have been turning up on TFL lately, and yours is not an exception. Very nice bake! I wish I could have a piece of your loaf, just to taste its utter goodness. :)

Zita 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

If you make it, the only hard part to get is the toasted coconut juice.  I got mine at a Vietnamese supermarket called the Mekong Market.  You can sub some coconut water.  If you want the bread to taste a little bit sweet you can check the label and see how much sugar is in it - mine had 14 grams.

Thanks for your compliments and happy baking.

clazar123's picture
clazar123

Your breads are gorgeous and your plating is phenomenal. Any guest at your table is, indeed,fortunate!

Thank you for sharing so many details on these wonderful loaves.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

25 years ago we wanted to leave the rat race in Scottsdale for the country and moved here.  The were 7,000 people living here then and we used to say that Gil lived on one side of the dirt road and and his brother Bert lived on the other side.  Back then the roads downtown weren't even paved and you could ride your horse downtown, tie her up at the Brass Rail; the local saloon where they had indoor, air conditioned, horse shoe pitching pits.  There  you could do two tosses at once; a cold beer going down with a shoe going down range towards its mark - a Tossing Two'fer.    Now there are 230,000 people that live here and if you rode your horse anywhere in this big city, they would arrest you.

I like to post pictures that fit the narative and formula so anyone, especially new bread bakers, can easily follow along and make the bread being fearured, know how to do it, what it supposed to look like and when it is supposed to look like that.

This year we are saddened that my wife's relatives from NJ won't be joining us for Thanksgiving for the first time in ages due to the horrible effects of Sandy.  Pehaps they will come for the holidays at the end of the year.

Glad you like the plates too and thanks for you comment.  Have a Happy Thanksgivng!    

Mebake's picture
Mebake

You don't buy no bread books do you, DA? I'll call you a freelance, self made homebaker :) :) You'd want our imagination to run wild trying to figure out how your bakes taste one recipe after the other.You sure have knack for adding wonderful ingredients to your bread recipes, i'll hand it to you my friend.

The bread is a perfect fit for your thanksgiving turkey stuffing, and healthy too.

Happy thanksgiving to you, and yours.

Khalid

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

trusty "Complete Book of Bread" Bernard Clayton, first edition, that I got in 1973 and from which my first SD starter was  made in San Francisco in 1973.  With a book that is supposed to be complete you shouldn't need another one.  It sure seems to be missing much today but I am still amazed at how many bread recipes from all over the world he crammed in it.  It is well worn and one of my prized possessions but there are no pictures, so you don't have any idea what he thought each was supposed to look like.  I've only baked one bread out of that book that I didn't like.   A Scahdanavian rye and cardamom bread was't to my liking because of the spice.  You probably have to be raised with it to like it I'm thinking.   I told Stan that I would get the 2nd edition of ITJB  so I will soon have 2 bread books.

TFL is way better than any bread book .  Just follow a dozen or so blogs, see what is posted new every day and pay attention to what Ian is putting in his bread and your all set :-)   The new folks bring fresh insights and ideas and aren't set in their ways.  Many aren't professionally trained to all do the same thing - the same ways - at the same time.  Tradition can be all tied up with pride and ego and they are 2 of the three character attributes, along with fear, that cause failure and to be avoided at all costs.

Happy Thanksgiving to you Khalid.  Get well soon and have a decent shawarma and pita with some hummus for your own  little Thanksgiving that your surgery went well.  I miss the simple things  from my short time in your neck of the woods,

isand66's picture
isand66

Sorry I'm so late to the party!  I've been busy negotiations on my new job and I have limited Internet access over here in North Carolina.  I love your crust and crumb on this one.  I bet that will make the best stuffing ever.  I've always used challah bread for my stuffing but I'm sure your SD bread will be excellent.

Wish you and your family a happy Thanksgiving.

Regards

ian