The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Replacing glass in LG Range?

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pdurusau's picture
pdurusau

Replacing glass in LG Range?

I have been steaming bread with the cup and pan method but every time I do, I cover the door window on my LG range with a large towel. Which takes time. Which lets heat out.

I checked with LG and they don't make a replacement door with no window.

Has anyone replaced the inner glass in an LG or other gas range with metal? Thinking if I got the exact dimensions on the inner glass, I could salvage an old metal oven door and have it cut to git. Then replace the inner glass with the metal.

Suspect it would change the heating characteristics a little but then random drips would not be the scary issue they are now.

Thanks!

Hope everyone is having a great week!

Patrick

LindyD's picture
LindyD

Rather than going through all the work and cost of trying to replace the glass in the door, why not just use a small watering can with a long spout?

I have a glass window in my oven door; used to cover it with a piece of cardboard when steaming, then received a Haws watering can.  Puts the water precisely where I want it with no worry:

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/27937/im-distraught-and-need-help-folks-who-routinely-produce-beautiful-breads-gas-ovens#comment-209536

Laurentius's picture
Laurentius

May, I ask why you cover the window? It will not break and will recover from the fog very fast.

LindyD's picture
LindyD

If you do a TFL search on cracked oven glass, you'll come across reports of unhappy bakers who, while steaming their preheated ovens, inadvertently splashed water on the hot window glass of their oven doors, shattering the glass.  

Fog isn't an issue - the OP is concerned about spilling water on the hot glass.   Me too, which is why I use the Haws watering can.

drips's picture
drips

How about just getting a thin piece of sheet metal (ideally stainless steel(?)) that's a bit bigger than the window. You could either use short, self-tapping screws to attach, or for an easily removeable setup use several powerful magnets around the perimeter should work.

I didn't have any spare sheet metal lying around so I took this pic using paper and some small magnets.  

pdurusau's picture
pdurusau

I really like the simplicity of the watering can as opposed to my proposed solution!

On the other hand, what prompted this post was pasting the top of a baguette yesterday every 30 seconds with a brush. So the danger of drops/spillage on the window was much greater.

For that case, the sheet metal with magnets would be a great choice. (I am a little leery of peircing metal when I don't know what is on the other side. I know there is insulation inside, but not what kind)

Thanks again!

pdurusau's picture
pdurusau

I mentioned the magnet solution to my older brother, an electrical engineer, and he says the magnets can fail due to high heat.

Searching on that notion, I found that if a magnet reaches the "Curie temperature," it will lose its magnetic field.

On that, see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curie_temperature

For an iron magnet, that is 770 degrees Celsius, or about 1,482 degrees Fahrenheit.

At least with my LG model, I think I am fairly safe. ;-)

Will report back if the magnets I use start to lose their magnetic fields.

Now to find some "safe" magnets that aren't coated with stuff that makes the kitcken a toxic zone. Some substances do odd things even in normal cooking range temperatures.

 

 

drips's picture
drips

What the magnets might release into the air is something I hadn't considered but I'm glad you did!

I didn't mention the Curie temp before because it seemed unlikely you'd hit that in your oven. However I just found some new numbers that has ferrite and ceramic magnets listed as 572°F and some neodynium as low as 590°F. Probably above baking temp, and I found some info that below that critical point nothing much happens (i.e. no roll-off of magnetism) but I also found a 10 year old girl's science project report that had some loss of force at only 210°F. [Thanks internet!]

Good old simple solutions... often more complex than you think.

Here's a link to an online magnet store that offers several 'high temperature' magnets. Looks like Sumarium Cobalt (SmCo) might be the best choice. But I'm no expert on baking magnets. [I've never purchased from that site; just the first one I found with high-temp magnets]

barryvabeach's picture
barryvabeach

I agree with the suggestion you should cover the glass - even with the watering spout, all it takes is a few drops to crack the glass.  You might have some success with the high temp magnets.  I used super magnets on my oven door ( the springs on the hinge failed and they don't sell replacement hinges) for a while but the magnets lost their strength pretty quickly - so by the fourth or fifth time I used the oven they had very little strength even when cold.  I think the easist thing would be to buy a baking sheet that is bigger than the window and use that as a covering.    There shouldn't be much of a problem drilling into the door,  I ended up drilling into the top of my door no problems.  You will only need 4 very small holes and 4 sheet metal screws. Special glass is also available that is more resistant to thermal shock than normal heat treated glass but it would be extremely expensive. 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

with a couple of hooks?  Easily hung and easily removed.

Existing screws could be lengthened if needed (if stainless use cloth between regular skrewdriver and screw) and hooks added.  

pdurusau's picture
pdurusau

Thanks again!

To get outside the lip around the inside window is going to take a pan about 23 x 16, maybe a little less.

I am thinking about a full sheet pan cut down and bent to the right size.

If I can get a good fit, likely to go with the screws. The window just lets me see something is in the oven and I should know that already if I am baking. ;-)

I can't judge color, etc., through the window.

Hope everyone is looking forward to a baking weekend! It's good weather for it!

Patrick

drips's picture
drips

I think that's a great choice. Simple and reliable.

Personally I wouldn't want to bake without a window. Just last night I was thinking about a better bulb for my oven that WOULD let me judge color!

pdurusau's picture
pdurusau

Curious, do you have a wall mounted oven or one on the floor? I have always had floor models so no experience with judging color where I have a better line of sight.

drips's picture
drips

Standard household floor unit. The bulb is in the back and the door has a mesh pattern screened on it (like  a microwave) so finding a way to see the color might be a pipe dream. But I am a beginner and I could use all the help I can get!