The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Using Starter Straight From Fridge

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Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Using Starter Straight From Fridge

Hey all.  I know that typically one would refresh a sourdough starter when it has been in the fridge for a while, however,  can you use the starter (in this case rye starter) straight from fridge if need be?  This one in particular was placed in fridge 3 hours after its last feeding, and was healthy at the time of refridgeration a week ago. 

I am making Hamelman's 5 Grain (Non-Levain) but was itching to use the rye starter.  I put a few tsp of the starter straight from the fridge into room temp/warm water, then added this to the final dough build, which included some active dry yeast.

Will it produce any effect on the dough at all?

John

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

I just found a past forum post answering my question - kind of.  Sorry for the posting.  Are there any new ideas/comments to this question?

John

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

then use it in the amount in the recipe after it has been inoculated.  Not a tablespoon but 150g or 200g of refrigerated starter = to the recipe starter build.  Don't forget to save some starter to feed and continue the refrigerator starter.  

A few teaspoons just will not contribute much when competing with inclusion of enough active dry yeast to raise the dough before the sourdough can establish itself.  

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Thanks again Mini.  Wow, is there anything about baking bread you DON'T know? :)

As mentioned, I only used a few teaspoons to a 1 lb loaf recipe.  I didn't notice any difference with the rise.  Perhaps the flavour will be a bit different?  Probably still not enough to make a difference?

John

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

There is a lot I don't yet know.  A lot.

I have been in situations where I had to crank out a loaf without much planning or preparation having to use my refrigerated mother starter to raise a loaf.  It's not ideal but can be done.  It all comes down to the condition of the starter and where you want to go with it.  When time is short, yeast can almost always be added to speed things up but to use yeast in the beginning of dough process wipes out most of your options with using sourdough starter.   Of coarse it depends on the amounts.  Just a pinch of yeast will give the sourdough beasties more time.  

Dividing the dough, part with sourdough and part with yeast is also an option,  I believe referred to as "epoxy" dough when both doughs are then blended together.  Lots of fun awaits!  :)