The Fresh Loaf

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8 Hour SD YW Saturday Night Pizza and Friday Shrimp Kabobs

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dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

8 Hour SD YW Saturday Night Pizza and Friday Shrimp Kabobs

There is no question my apprentice likes to retard her pizza dough overnight but, sometimes you just don’t have that much time when the pizza urge hits you.  No worries!  We managed a very nice pizza in 8 hours starting at 10 AM yesterday.

 

We started the combo YW and Desem WW levain build and cut the 3 stage build from 3 to 2.  Two hours for the first stage and 3 hours for the second.  It had doubled in 5 hours.  For the last 3 hours of the levain build we autolysed the flour, dried rosemary, olive oil, Moho de Ajo, (2) malts, sun dried tomato oil, salt and the dough water.

 

We always try to have around 30% whole grains in our formulas if possible and this time it was a mix of whole wheat and soft white wheat that we ground at home.  So Desem WW starter was in order and we wanted the boost that YW gives to speed things along some due to the shot amount of time we had to get this dough ready.

 

5 hours in; 3 PM, we mixed the autolyse and the levains in the KA for 6 min on KA 2 and 2 minutes on KA 3.  Then we let it rest for 10 minutes.  We then did 3 sets of S & F’s, 10 minutes apart on a lightly oiled counter, starting with 20 stretches and ¼ turns and reducing the stretches by 5 each set – a total of 45 stretches.

The dough was ready to go after 2 hours and 15 minutes of resting and fermenting in a plastic covered oiled bowl.  At 5:15 PM we fired Old Betsy; Big GE oven too 500 F no steam.  These 2 pizzas were fully peel size and there was no way these were going to fit in the mini oven without some serious magic or ‘Honey I shrunk the pizza’ going on.

We also had the baking stone in there too since we never take it out of the oven except to move it to the grill for pizza there - like last time. Thankfully, after yesterday’s torrential rain it never got over 92 F so a little more heat in the house was not a big deal if you are used to 115 F for the last who knows how long.

After dividing the dough in half, we hand stretched it out to peel size, brushed a layer of some more Mojo de Ajo on, docked it  and put it in the oven to par bake for 3 minutes.  Then we removed it and then piled on the toppings of our choice, kalamata olives, hatch green chilies, red peppers, caramelized onions, re-hydrated dried shitake mushrooms, home made Italian sausage, pepperoni; parmesan, Colby and mozzarella cheeses  and some fresh basil for a garnish after it came out of the oven.

Then back into the oven for another 7 minutes or so to get nice and brown  - since, as Anne Burrell says “brown food tastes good’ and Brownmen agree with her.

 

Friday night grilled shrimp kabobs with Mexican Green Dirty Rice.  We are thinking beer can chicken for tonight.

The crust came out picture perfect thin and crisp, nicely browned on the bottom and tasted good.  After cutting, the slices were flat out rigid when held up, even with all the toppings and didn’t go limp, like NY Pizza, until the left over slices were being wrapped for freezing.

Sorry the photos are so bad this time but at night with indoor lighting it is the best my apprentice could manage.  They are still better then the ones my phone takes!  Formula follows at the end.

Soft White Wheat, WWSD YW Combo Pizza Dough

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Starter Build

Build 1

Build 2

Total

%

Desem  Starter

10

0

10

2.75%

Yeast Water

10

0

10

2.75%

Soft White

0

25

25

6.89%

WW

25

0

25

6.89%

AP

0

50

50

13.77%

Water

20

50

70

19.28%

Total

65

125

190

52.34%

 

 

 

 

 

Combo YW SD Starter

 

%

 

 

Flour

105

28.93%

 

 

Water

85

23.42%

 

 

Starter Hydration

80.95%

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

 

29.01%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

Soft White Wheat

58

15.98%

 

 

WW

0

0.00%

 

 

Bread Flour

100

27.55%

 

 

AP

100

27.55%

 

 

Total Dough Flour

258

71.07%

 

 

Salt

7

1.93%

 

 

Water

170

46.83%

 

 

Dough Hydration

65.89%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

Dried Rosemary

1

0.28%

 

 

Red Rye Malt

2

0.55%

 

 

White Rye Malt

2

0.55%

 

 

EVOO 10, SD Tom. 10, MdA 5

25

6.89%

 

 

Total

30

8.26%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour w/ Starter

363

 

 

 

Total Water w/ Starter

255

 

 

 

Tot. Hydration  w/ Starter

70.25%

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

69.29%

 

 

 

Total Weight

655

 

 

 

% Whole Grain

30.71%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comments

isand66's picture
isand66

Sounds like you had a nice pizza party...just hold the olives for my slice :)

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

My wife hates olives and prefers her pizza without pepperoni.  Here was her pizza last night.

Personally, pizza without olives and pepperoni should be illegal :-)

 

isand66's picture
isand66

I can deal with the pepperoni for sure but sausage is my favorite or my new favorite pastrami.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

the secrets of my pizza sauce is the minced (very fine) pepperoni I put it for a long simmer.  Another is Swiss chard.  Are you making your own pastrami now?  I  still can't find my recipe.

isand66's picture
isand66

No I haven't tried my own but I really want to soon.

Thats a great idea for the sauce.

If you get a chance I would love if you could email your pizza sauce recipe.

Thanks

Ian

isand66's picture
isand66

Those kabobs look awesome too!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

they were.  Used a new marinade on them that didn't have much soy sauce in it and no dark mushroom flavored soy.   My wife likes meat and fish  better w/o soy sauces.   Loved  veggies made this way.  Weird that the veg takes 16 minutes and the shrimp 4   to cook - thus the 2 skewers.

gmabaking's picture
gmabaking

one happy apprentice with all that good food to savor!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

she doesn't get any snacks when her 'Evil Nemisis'; the wife;  is around to monitor table scraps and other stuff that ends up on the floor during  dinner.   So my poor starving apprentice didn't get a taste of either meal.  Now lunches are a different matter for same reason...... 'Evil Nemisis' is not around to keep my apprentice hungry :-)

Thank goodness, lunch is the main meal for us.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

too.

Basic Italian / Pizza Sauce

 Sauté in 4 quart pot until anchovies melt - If you don't like putenesca than omit the anchovies - I don't put them in usually because we forget and don't ever make this with the recipe in fornt of me.

1 T olive oil

½ tsp red pepper flakes

4 anchovies

 Add:

2-4 cloves garlic

1 large onion chopped

2 green onions chopped

6 mushrooms chopped (or 1 oz dried porcini reconstituted)

1 tsp each dried; oregano, basil, red pepper flakes

2 tsp dried Italian seasoning

2 bay leaves

 Sauté until onions are soft then add:

3 chopped sun dried tomatoes (packed in olive oil) and 3 T of tomato paste and  2 T minced fine pepperoni

Sauté until tomato paste begins to caramelize add 1 C dark, dry red wine and sauté until red wine has evaporated. I use Australian Cab or shiraz. 

Add:

2  15  oz cans  of diced tomatoes

1 8 oz can of tomato sauce

1 chopped large fresh roma tomato

1 C chopped fresh spinach - I use Swiss Chard when ever I can .

1 tsp sugar

1 tsp fresh cracked pepper

1 ½ C home made chicken stock

1 C water

 Simmer for 2-4 hours adding water as necessary to maintain proper consistency .  The longer the better.  Cool and refrigerate 12 hours.

  Meat Sauce Additions:  At the very beginning brown off 1 lb of home made hot Italian sausage first, reserve separate if pizza or if making a meat sauce add back in after tomato  then do the rest of the recipe for a meat sauce.  You can use ground beef but it won’t be as good.

 If yon want less heat cut back on the red pepper flakes.  Makng a pasta sauce - cut back on the  pepperoni, red pepper flakes and Italian sausage.

You can use whte wine, Pino Grigio  for pasta.

Toad.de.b's picture
Toad.de.b

DAB - I've been meaning to take a minute to say that your posts are getting downright encyclopedic, as well as of course, visually delectable.  That Andy's prune/nut bread post was a major opus -- the bread looks totally scrumptious.  But now we're getting not only the dough, but the sauce and ... wine recommendations!  What's next?  Cigar suggestions?  You're setting a crazy high standard for TFL blog posts!

Nice baking!  And posting!

Tom

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I suppose my first love in the kitchen is cooking followed by baking pies and cakes with bread bringing up the rear.  Some folks know that I completed my cookbook for my daughter (a couple of years ago now) who realized we did all of our cooking from memory with nothing written down.  So I took a year and wrote them all down as I cooked them.   Now I take pictures of them when I cook them to add to the cookbook.  There are all kinds of bread recipes in it too now - going over 400 recipes soon.  She has a nice keepsake.

Ths recipe was written down over 3 years ago when Australian wines were cheep but good.     Now I use California wines for cooking because they are now good but cheap.  I rarely use a bottle of wine for cooking that costs more than $3 a bottle.  This one was a Tisdale Shiraz I paid $3.33 for at Sprouts my normal one costs $2.47  but found this one first.  They say you shouldn't cook with a wine you won't drink.  That can get pretty pricey for cooking wine.  I say you should cook with a wine you would drink that doesn't cost more than $ 3 a bottle :-)   My brother has a real nose and palate for fine wines and has quite a collection of them and it is a nice hobby for him.  Thankfully, I'm not that discriminating so my wines cost much less :-) 

When we used to do tastes test for Kerrygold cheese and butter, we quickly found out that folks, if they didn't see the label in a blind taste test, they couldn't tell expensive supposed to be good or best from non expensive not supposed to be good almost all the time.  That shows the power of large marketing budgets.  But ,if the test wasn't blind, they would always pick the one they liked the best that was a recognized premium brand.  If you put the good label on the supposedly inferior product they would pick the inferior product with the good label almost every time. 

Same thing goes for beer and wine too.  In blind testing here and all over the wold Kerrygold cheese's and butter were by far the most popular.  So I do the same thing for wines and beer, I blind taste test them with folks and then use the one that finishes very high but is very inexpensive.  So save yourself some money and buy what you really like, rather than what someone else likes or promotes, instead.  

I'm glad you like the posts.  I hope folks that try the breads have a good example and method to follow and can figure out what to do easily enough.  You have a keen eye Tom.  Andy's bread is one of my favorite top 5 breads that has about 15 on it now :-)  I was surprised more folks didn't comment on it.  I thought it must have been my post that put them off  because it couln't have been the bread.

Thank's for commenting Tom.

Toad.de.b's picture
Toad.de.b

...not only with the wide wide world of TFL but with your progeny -- arguably more important.  And a passion for food and cooking.  No better one. 

What I've noticed in particular is how your photo documentation has notched up significantly since I first started lurking here earlier this year.  It's gone from barely doing justice to the culinary magnificence to downright comprehensive.  You and Ian are good at stopping to snap pix of mixed, proofed and loaded doughs, as well as beaucoup of finished prods.  Very instructive.  I wish others would.  I always record the final loaf, but rarely earlier stages.  Probably should.

Your Kerrygold tale reminds me of similar nonsense among audiophiles, many of whom fear eschew blind testing because, I strongly suspect, they're afraid to learn they've been bamboozled into buying names over actual perceived sound quality.  It's rampant in that realm.

Too many breads and so little time.  Retirement does have a certain appeal.

Keep on bakin, dab.

Tom

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

when my daughter gave me her old Nikon S70 camera that has close up macro setting and even has a food setting too!  She said her old camera was broken but she just wanted a new camera :-)  She got one and I no longer have to use my cell phone for pictures.   I think I will cut down on the number of pixtures on future posts unless my apprentice comes up with something new to show The Fresh like bread made in a cold fusion oven that runs on polluted air and water - she is working very hard at it,especailly having a few too many :-)

gmabaking's picture
gmabaking

Don't even think of cutting back on your photo essays, barked my apprentice. No fair! Your pictures show us all such an array of things, from Arizona Sunsets to fantastic looking pizza and breads, giving us both guidelines and ideas. Looking at the Tartine book for instance with page after page of pictures and recipes with bread but not for making bread.

That said, I think posting recipes (and pictures) of companions to our bread is a fine idea. What would a roll be without some soup or gravy to ever so delicately slosh around in?

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

one to bring tears to my apprentice's eyes!  She said you need a sunset to call your own and a dessert fit for such fine words of wisdom that only come from a life well lived.  Thank you so much.  You made my day.  So on to tonight's monsoon sunset after raining for most of the day and a desert desert tart of apple, peach, plum and nectarine with a splash of bourbon.  Enjoy!

 

 

 

isand66's picture
isand66

That's some sunset....and the tart is not too shabby either :)

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

of fruits for a tart but it works as well as a mixed berry one does.  There is also a little fresh ginger in it too.

Thanks Ian

gmabaking's picture
gmabaking

again for your kind thoughts and the tart reflected the gold of the sunset in a lovely way!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

a very wet monsoon this year so the sunsets have been equally abundant and colorful.  You are most welcome and that tart has a WW crust to make it healthy and it is half the amount of crust I usually use - thin like a pizza this time to cut down on the calories  - if you don't eat twice as much of it :-)   You have to love the end of summer when all the fruits are begging to be tarted up somehow!

Can't wait for you and your sisters to start up the ITJB weekly bakes and posts again.

wmtimm627's picture
wmtimm627

I'm not familiar with that term and what the 2 stages are all about.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Desem (Dutch for "leaven") is a type of sourdough starter made from whole wheat, spelt or other flours (amaranth or kamut) and water, inoculated by wild yeasts and bacteria, traditionally used in Belgium to make healthy, nutrient-rich bread. The starter is grown in a bed of flour at cool temperatures until it reaches sufficient maturity. The term "desem" also describes the loaf made with this starter. Desem bread made from a mature desem is characterized by a strong rise, and a light texture, and nutty, slightly sour taste. The loaf is similar in process to the French "pain au levain", but made with whole wheat flour and starter instead of white flour.

Desem bread has a strong following in the natural foods community, where it was largely popularized by vegetarian cookbook author Laurel Robertson.

I started mine the Joe Ortiz way he popularized in his bread book and  on Julian Chold's Baking with Masters.  He uses a little cumin and tsp of milk with WW and water.    It was powerful I was making bread with it in 3 days.