The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

My first Canadian loaves

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Floydm's picture
Floydm

My first Canadian loaves

I've always admired immigrants, folks who, for love or opportunity, pull up their roots and start over.  This summer we've been going through what has to be the easiest immigration process possible -- same language, same geographic region, very similar culture, no questions of about citizenship or difficulty finding employment -- and still... it has been a tremendous amount of work.  I can't even imagine how much work it must be when the obstacles are larger or the circumstances less fortunate.  My respect and admiration for anyone who has gone through it has been redoubled.

Now we are here in Vancouver, largely settled in.  As of today my kids and I are on the Provincial health plan.  My wife's papers have been approved too, so she is legitimately residing with us and no longer "visiting."   All has gone as well as one could possible wish for and we are loving it here.

And I'm finally finding a little time to bake.  Well, only once, so far, but it is a start.

Baking in a new kitchen is always a challenge.  As is using a new oven that isn't mine with a glass door.  No more tossing ice cubes in willy nilly and not worrying about the damage I do.  But I brought my baking stone and picked up an aluminum roasting pan to invert over it to create a little steam, so we'll see how it goes.

I spotted this flour blend at the grocery store and decided to give it a try. 

I was extremely imprecise on this one, just trying to get back in the saddle rather take accurate measure.  My formula was roughly:

Poolish

1 cup AP flour

1 pinch instant yeast

1 cup water

I left that out covered on the counter overnight and then mixed it into

2 cups Robin Hood bread blend 

1 cup AP flour

1 cup water

2 teaspoons Kosher salt

1 teaspoon instant yeast

Mixed with my standmixer for 5 minutes, let rise on the counter top for an hour, folded and put in the refrigerator for 6 hours.

About an hour before baking, I removed it from the fridge, divided it, and shaped a couple of loaves.  I rolled them in sesame seeds before placing them on a pan since I forgot to pick up parchment paper and the last thing I wanted was to have them stick to the pan and ruin everything.

They rose for about an hour, then were baked at 465 for 10 minutes with the aluminum cover, then 425 for another 15 minutes after I removed the lid.

I can't say they were the best loaves I've ever made, but I certain consider them a success and a great starting point!

-Floyd

Comments

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Any move is a pain. It sounds like yours went as smoothly as it could. The first bake in a new (to you) oven is also a challenge, and I'd say yours was more than satisfactory. 

Wishing you and your family much happiness in your new home and happy baking!

David

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Thanks, David!

-Floyd

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Hi Floyd,

So glad to hear about your settling in and that the big hurdles are behind.  You seem to have moved right into the little, more manageable hurdles with your first bake :-)  These loaves look very nice to me especially with the sesame seeds on the crust.  I always loved sesame seeds on the breads I ate as a child.

I have been adjusting to a new oven too - convection only but has humidity :-) but I do have to say the learning curve is a lot quicker now that I know what I am doing.  The step back is nothing compared to that first step I took a couple of years ago.  I can't imagine that your oven will keep you mystified for long.  I look forward to hearing about your progress :-)

Again, it is good to hear your latest news.  Thanks sooo much for the update.

Take Care,

Janet

isand66's picture
isand66

It's nice to see you and your family are settled in.  I wish you nothing but success in your new home and from what I have seen of Vancouver at a layover it is a beautiful city to make your home.

For your first loaf at your new place it looks pretty good to me!

Regards,
Ian

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Thanks, Ian.

-Floyd

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

The move and the bake : )

My Very Best To You and Yours!

Sylvia

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Thanks, Sylvia.

-Floyd

GSnyde's picture
GSnyde

I hope all continues to go well in your new home.  

Nice bread.  But, I bet you put some water in the final dough.

Best,

Glenn

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Thanks, Glenn.  And, yes, I did put some water on the final dough to make the seeds stick.

Best,

Floyd

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Floyd must have used at least a half a cup of water to stick those fine looking seeds on :-) 1 C of Water doen't seem like enough for 4 C of flour -but Canada might be tad more humid and snowy too :-)

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Duh, I didn't catch what Glenn meant.  Yes, I put a cup of water in the final dough.

-Floyd 

GSnyde's picture
GSnyde

I figured there was water in there.  I guess my comment was too subtle.

Glenn

Floydm's picture
Floydm

No, I'm just too thick.

-Floyd

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Hey Floyd.  Welcome to Vancouver!  I am about 25 minutes away in Langley, but basically a Vancouverite.  Where did you move from?

Your loaves here make me a little less proud of my Hamelman 5 Grain (non-levain) riff today (photos on another post today by me).  I will be trying this recipe you posted VERY soon.

As a major foodie I would be happily obliged to give you some advice of where to go locally for the greatest anything food.

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Thanks!

The food here is great.  That is one of the reasons I haven't been baking... we've been out sampling everything!

We're by UBC.  I've not made it up to Langley yet but some good friends of ours just moved there, so I suspect we'll be checking it out before too long.

Best,

Floyd

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hi Floyd,
Your bread looks really good, seedy, crusty and nicely baked - wishing you many more successful bakes in your new oven!
Best wishes to you and your family - so good to hear things are going well for you.
Looking forward to seeing you at KCW.
:^) breadsong

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Thanks, Breadsong!  I'm looking forward to meeting you too.

-Floyd

rayel's picture
rayel

Hi Floyd, the adventure begins. I think you are off to an easy start in your new home. Your bread looks really good, and a little reminiscent of my God Mother's bread, as she always used Robin Hood flour, and sesame. Her bread was always white and braided, and baked in loaf tins. Great stuff at Christmas, and with my God Father's home made wine, my wife and I were happy people.

All the best, Ray

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Sounds like good stuff.

-Floyd

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

a really nice loaf to start in BC but with 1 C of water in the poolish and none in the dough, I'm getting about 43% hydration - a little dry even for my bagel loving tastes.  I C of water seems like too little for 4 C of flour especially when 2 of the cups of  flour are that fine Robin Hood mixed whole flours.  Is there some water missing?

Nice baking and the scoring is very nice too.  Glad you are settling in.

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Whoops!  Yes, you are right, I added another cup of water to the final dough.  Thanks for catching that.

Can't tell I'm out of practice at all, can you? ;^)  At least I only left the water out of the write up and not the dough!

Best,

-Floyd

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

now that you are fully Canadian again these things may happen more often than you would think or want - especially when the snow is deep, the whisky long gone and too expensive to replace across the border :-)  Vancouver will make you forget all about faulty formulas and expensive booze.  The fish is fantastic and now that you are there - the bread is definitely better. 

The best to you and yours,

I think your cool flour is just fine and dandy being a mix of whole grains no matter who makes it.  I love the Indian Durum atta (Golden Temple brand) I buy at Lee Lee's Chinese Market in Chandler AZ. It is grown and milled it Canada.  Talk about multicultural implications and possible global ization.........

Bake on my friend!

Postal Grunt's picture
Postal Grunt

I admit that I spend too much time in the flour aisles of supermarkets. Fortunately, my wife humors me when we travel and laughs as I check out the flour and mustards in the local supermarkets. Some White Lily Bread Flour found its way into the trunk of my car when I was in Corinth, MS last week.

If you know anyone with connections at RH, would you please ask them to nudge the company into stocking some of that interesting flour here in Kansas?

isand66's picture
isand66

Floyd,

You have my backing 100%.  This was not the place for a tirade like that and was very inappropriate.

There are plenty of place to stand on a soap box and lament the cruelties of the world but this was not the time or place.

It's not like you bought the store out of Robin Hood flour.

Mebake's picture
Mebake

You have not lost your touch! Simple, yet elegant loaves. I'm glad you are settled in, given how hard it is to migrate with family. I look forward to your new baking adventures. 

And what a fine looking bag of flour! Where you reside, You should be Able to get access to some of the finest bread flours in the world!

Khalid

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Thanks, Khalid.

-Floyd

joyfulbaker's picture
joyfulbaker

Baking in your new home must have been a thrill, Lloyd.  That city has stayed in my memory for many years and some day I would love to return.  Canada seems like a wonderful place to make a new life, and I wish you all the best.  Beautiful breads to bless your new home!

Joy

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Thanks, Joy.

-Floyd

M2's picture
M2

It is so great that we have one more bread lover (family) moving to Vancouver.  And what an accomplishment of producing such beautiful loaf of bread in a new environment!  We've just moved to this new house last year and my first loaf of bread was a disaster: fridge temp was out of whack and the oven was totally different than our old one.

One of the best kitchen stores (and bakeware) is Gourmet Warehouse ("warehouse" is just the name of the store). They have lots of varieties and good quality stuff, not to mention some speciality food items.  The owner and her staff are all friendly people.  I just love shopping there.  Check it out!

Cheers,

Michelle

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Thanks, Michelle.  I'll have to check Gourmet Warehouse out.

Best,

Floyd

mc_janine's picture
mc_janine

I'm waiting for the timer to go off to do the second fold on your pan sur poolish, that I am experimenting with as the base recipe for some sour dough culture I've managed to keep alive for a couple of years now. I've been popping in and out of your website for almost as long, and I've found it a great site. So welcome to my city. As noted above, The Gourmet Warehouse on Hastings is a great place, as is Meinhardt's in South Granville. A note about Canadian flour for those who might not know, it's not the same as it's U.S. cousin (you may find yourself begging friends to bring back some KA for you as the hit the border), but it works as long as you remember to use LESS. This is where your experienceuat look and feel will help you. When I am pressed for time and make breads from AB5D I automatically cut the flour by a half a cup and even then, I sometimes need to add a little moisture to get it slack enough. Like our beer, our everyday flour is stronger :). You don't notice it so much when you're baking cakes, but bread? WHOA! I'm looking forward to a new batch of recipes from you that are Canadian-eh?

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Thanks, Janine!  

I'm definitely noticing that the AP flour is stronger here.  And, yes, now the kids are in school I'm finally getting some time to explore the supplies side of the culinary world here, which is quite exciting.

Best,

Floyd

kitcar's picture
kitcar

Another tip from a fellow Canuck re: flour - there are still a few historic mills left which produce some interesting products. Check out http://arvaflourmill.com/?show=products for example (although its located in Ontario, they ship nationally) - their flours are used by most of the artisenal bakers in the Toronto area.