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Baking for the Powburn Show, 2012. My Account of Codruta's Visit

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Baking for the Powburn Show, 2012. My Account of Codruta's Visit

Hello All,

I began writing this account travelling back to the UK, as follows:

Monday 21st August 2012; 14:32, UK time.

 

As I start to write up this blog entry, Alison and I are sitting inside a somewhat cold steel tube, high up in the sky, somewhere over France, on our return to the UK.   We have just spent 2 weeks on the lovely Greek island of Paxos, enjoying a wonderful holiday together and basking in temperatures into the high 30s, with permanent daytime sunshine.   We believe we will be returning to the ubiquitous showers which we left behind, and which have constantly afflicted most of the UK all Summer-long, thus far.

 

At this time, I fear there could be some delay to my being able to post this entry for you all to read on the Fresh Loaf.   Our Broadband Router had failed on the day of Codruta’s departure and the day before we left for Greece.   I expect I will have to wait a few days for BT to send out a replacement device, so we can once again re-connect with the internet.   Certainly our time on Paxos has kept me away from the worldwide web.   I have just about managed to keep an eye on incoming e-mail, but not been able to reply to any.   The dongle provided for me by Vodafone is a complete waste of time; I had more success with my very ordinary mobile phone accessing the internet, most of the time.   Ho hum!

 

Side note, added later: Now back home in Ananda, and the Broadband is working fine; excellent!

 

Still, this post is meant to be positive, indeed celebratory, so enough of the negativity.   Alison and I greatly enjoyed the company of Codruta for a week of relatively intense baking…and she even brought sunny weather for us to enjoy for the first time properly since March!   Here is my account of our baking activities and other matters during Codruta’s visit back at the very beginning of August.

 

I met Codruta at the airport late on the Monday evening, having completed all the final plans for our baking activities leading to the Powburn Show, over that weekend, then fired my oven in preparation on the Monday, as well as building leavens, sourdoughs and other pre-ferments.

 

I rose early on Tuesday to fire the oven once again, with Codruta joining me soon after so we could begin to mix the 3 doughs for that day’s production, and enjoy fruit and coffee for breakfast before my bakery kitchen became too overwhelmed by dough matters!   The first day we made Five Grain Levains, which is a Hamelman formula, moreorless but without the addition of bakers’ yeast; some Wholemeal Bloomers and some brown tinned loaves, both of which utilise a biga.   Recipes and formulae for these products are included below, although I have not included detail of the levain and sour builds:

 

  1. Five Grain Levain.

Yield: 8 loaves scaled @ 700g and 3 loaves scaled @ 960g

 

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1a. Levain

 

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

25

900

Water

15

540

TOTAL

40

1440

 

 

 

1b. Hot Soaker

 

 

Organic Flaked Rye

10

360

Flaxseed Blond

10

360

Organic Sunflower Seeds

7.5

270

Pinhead Oatmeal

7.5

270

Salt

0.67

24

Boiling Water

41

1476

TOTAL

76.67

2760

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Levain [from 1a]

40

1440

Hot Soaker [from 1b]

76.67

2760

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

50

1800

Marriage’s Organic Strong Wholemeal

25

900

Salt

1.5

54

Water

44

1584

TOTAL

237.17

8538

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

25

-

% overall hydration

98 [on flour]

72.6 [on flour + grain]

% wholegrain

25 [on flour]

40.74 [on flour + grain]

FACTOR

-

36

 

 

2. Wholemeal Bloomers

Yield: 8 loaves scaled @ 1030g.

 

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Overnight Biga

 

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

25

1200

Water

15

720

Fresh Yeast

0.2

9

TOTAL

40.2

1929

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Overnight Sponge [from 1]

40.2

1929

Marriage’s Organic Strong Wholemeal

75

3600

Fresh Yeast

1.52

73

Salt

1.52

73

Water

56

2688

TOTAL

174.24

8363

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

25

-

% overall hydration

71

-

% wholegrain flour

75

-

FACTOR

-

48

 

 

Method:

  • Make the sponge the night before and leave covered to ferment.
  • Calculate water temperature needed for DDT of 28°C.   Combine Water and Wholemeal in the mixer, then autolyse for one hour.
  • Add the Salt, Fresh Yeast and Sponge and mix in an upright mixer with the hook attachment for 3 minutes on first speed and 6 minutes on second speed.   Scrape down as necessary during mixing.
  • Bulk proof, maintaining the dough temperature @ 25°C for 2 - 3 hours with S&F after 1 hour, and 2 if needed.
  • Scale and divide. Mould, pre-shape and final shape.
  • Final proof @ 25°C for 1 hour
  • Bake in the wood-fired oven with steam.
  • Cool on wires.

 

3. Tinned Brown Bread

Yield: 7 loaves scaled @ 600g; 1 Pullman Pan @ 1100g and 1 small loaf with the remainder

Biga

 

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

50

1650

Fresh Yeast

0.18

6

Water

30

990

TOTAL

80.18

2646

 

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

Biga [as above]

80.18

2646

Gilchesters’ Organic Farmhouse Flour

50

1650

Salt

1.8

60

Shortening

1.8

60

Yeast

1.8

60

Water @ 23°C

38

1254

TOTAL

173.6

5730

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

50

-

% overall hydration

68

-

% wholegrain flour

50 [85% extraction]

-

FACTOR

-

33

 

Method:

 

  • Mix biga with all other materials to form a strong dough: 3 minutes first speed, 5 – 6 minutes on second speed.
  • Bulk proof 1½ hours.
  • Scale and divide.   Mould round and rest covered for 10 minutes.
  • Shape and place in ready-greased loaf tins.
  • Final Proof for 1 – 1½ hours.
  • Bake in wood-fired ovens.
  • Cool on wires

 

These are the photographs from our first two days of production.   All of the photographs have been taken on Codruta’s very fine camera, by someone with far greater photography skills than I possess.   I am very grateful to Codruta for giving me full access to the photographs she has taken.

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TDzTyngIFH0

As we worked away through our first days of production, I realised how much time Codruta devotes to social networking, sharing her baking activities and keeping up with so many other fine fellow-practitioners.   Alison quickly realised that maybe, I am not quite such an obsessive as she had previously believed!   Codruta posted photographs of the oven and of the breads as they emerged baked, straight on to her Facebook account.   I was amazed as she told me just how many people were following our activities and contributing either by making comments on the photos, or listing them as “favourites”.   The numbers kept on rising throughout the 4 days of baking too.

 

We managed to finish baking in good time on the first day; 27 loaves from 3 different doughs.   Since 2 of these used bakers’ yeast, and the oven had benefitted from firing the day before, Alison encouraged us to get out into the sunshine and enjoy the lovely Northumberland countryside on our doorstep.   We took a short drive, around 5km, to the head of the Ingram Valley to enjoy a lovely walk to Linhope Spout waterfall.   The following 2 slideshows give great account of our walk.

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r9RfzZ7Znw8

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GGuger-A4Ys

The following 3 days were taken up entirely with baking.   Whilst Wednesday’s production was similar in some ways to the previous day, we had 2 large batches of sour-dough based breads to make, and we had to prepare large amounts of levain, rye sourdough, biga, etc. to take to Leeds the next day.  We made 29 loaves altogether, 3 different doughs, as shown below:

 

4. Roasted Brazil Nut and Prune Bread

Yields 8 loaves scaled @ 490g

 

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Biga

 

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

20

400

Water

12

240

Fresh Yeast

0.2

4

TOTAL

32.2

644

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Biga [from 1]

32.2

644

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

55

1100

Marriage’s Organic Strong Wholemeal

25

500

Butter

5

100

Salt

1.6

32

Fresh Yeast

1.3

26

Water

56

1120

Soft Prunes

12.5

250

Brazil Nuts - toasted and chopped

12.5

250

TOTAL

201.1

4022

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

20

-

% overall hydration

68

-

% wholegrain flour

25

-

FACTOR

-

20

 

Method:

  • Prepare the Biga the night before.
  • Combine all the ingredients in the mixer except the fruit and nuts.   Mix on first speed until clear, scraping down as needed.   Mix for 6 minutes on second speed with the hook attachment.   Rest the dough for 20 minutes then add the fruit and nuts and mix to clear using a Scotch cutter.   DDT 28°C.
  • Bulk Ferment 1½ hours.
  • Scale and divide and mould round.   Rest 15 minutes then shape as bloomers.   Glaze with beaten egg.
  • Final proof 1½ hours.
  • Score the tops of the loaves with 3 diagonal cuts and bake in a pre-heated deck oven at 180°C with steam for 45 - 50 minutes.
  • Cool on wires.

 

 

5. Sourdough Seed Bread

 

Yield: 8 loaves @ 700g and 3 loaves @ 1000g

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1a. Wheat Levain

 

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

20

840

Water

12

504

TOTAL

32

1344

 

 

 

1b. Soaker

 

 

Organic Flax Seed Blond

7

294

Cold Water

21

882

TOTAL

28

1176

 

 

 

1c. Tamari-Roasted Seeds

 

 

Organic Sunflower Seeds

6

252

Organic Pumpkin Seeds

6

252

Organic Sesame Seeds

6

252

Organic Tamari Soy Sauce

-

-

TOTAL

18

756

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Wheat Levain [from 1a]

32

1344

Soaker [from 1b]

28

1176

Tamari Roasted Seeds [from 1c]

18

756

     

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

30

1260

Marriage’s Organic Strong Wholemeal

50

2100

Water

45

1890

Salt

1.79

75

TOTAL

204.79

8601

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

20

-

% overall hydration

78 on flour

63seeds + flour

% wholegrain flour

50

-

FACTOR

-

42

 

Method:

  • Build the levain from stock.   Prepare the soaker the night before.   Roast the seeds ahead of time to allow them to cool before adding to the dough.
  • In the mixer, combine the flour with the water and soaker and mix 3 minutes on first speed, scraping down to clear.   Autolyse for 1 hour.
  • Add the salt and levain and mix 3 minutes on first speed and 5 minutes on second speed, scraping down as needed.   Add the roasted seeds and mix on first speed to clear.   DDT 28°C.
  • Prove in bulk for 2½ hours; stretch and fold after 1 and 2 hours.
  • Scale, divide and mould round.   Rest 15 minutes and prepare bannetons.   Re-mould.
  • Final proof 2 hours
  • Bake in the wood-fired oven.
  • Cool on wires.

 

 

6. Caraway Rye with Blackstrap Molasses

 

Yield: 2 Miche @ 1350g, 4 loaves @ 960g, 4 loaves @ 700g; all scaling weights

Materials/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Rye Sourdough

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

25

1325

Water

41

2173

TOTAL

66

3498

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Rye Sour [from above]

66

3498

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

75

3975

Salt

1.8

95

Caraway Seeds

1.2

64

Black Strap Molasses

8

424

Water @ 40°C

26

1378

TOTAL

178

9434

 

 

 

% Pre-fermented flour

25

-

% Overall hydration

64.8

-

% Wholegrain flour

25

-

FACTOR

 

53

 

Method:

  • Build the sourdough as above.
  • Dissolve the molasses into the warm water.   Add the sourdough, seeds and salt, and then add the flour.   Use an upright mixer with hook attachment, and mix for 12 – 15 minutes on first speed only.   Scrape down the bowl as needed.   DDT 25°C.
  • Bulk ferment 2 hours.
  • Scale, divide and mould and rest 15 minutes, covered.   Re-mould dough pieces and place in prepared bannetons.
  • Final proof 2½ hours.
  • Tip out onto a dusted peel and score a diamond pattern on the top of the loaf.   Bake in a wood-fired oven.
  • Cool on wires.

 

 

We made a very early start the next morning, and managed to park up at the loading bay at Leeds City College, Thomas Danby Campus at exactly 08:00, as planned, after a rapid journey over 130 miles/210km in not much over 2 hours.   Codruta slept some of this time, but we also planned what we needed to do immediately on arrival to set up the secondary fermentation process for all 3 rye breads we wanted to make, by mixing scalds and sponges.   After that it was a quick breakfast and into full production.

 

Our time at Leeds was agreed and arranged with my long-time friend and colleague, Joe Cavalier, who manages all the Bakery provision at the College.   We set the 2 days up so that some of his key teaching staff were able to work alongside Codruta and I, and thus gain important CPD [professional development], with specialist dough work aplenty on offer.   Over the next 2 days, we made 3 types of Rye Bread [100% rye], 3 leavened breads in bannetons [2 with Gilchesters’ flours and one with a Type 80 Farine Biologique which Codruta’s Sister-in-Law had very kindly posted to me from Paris]; AND, we made Chollah, Spicy Buns, Laminated Pastries, plus Ciabattas and Focaccias.

Day One went by like a dream, and we drove east to visit my parents, near Bridlington, for an all-too-brief, but very enjoyable and comfortable overnight stop.   Day Two proved to be more challenging for a number of reasons; however, this is all part of working life within the bakery, and I wanted Codruta to experience as much as possible during her time in the UK.   Codruta has a great temperament; she is relaxed, yet totally hard working and dedicated.   I know her bakery will be a great success when she finds a venue and begins production; it was a joy to have her to visit us, and I truly hope she learned all she hoped to when she first asked to come over.

 

Here is the detail on what we produced at Leeds; and a massive thanks to Joe and his teaching colleagues for making this happen, and for all the enthusiasm and expertise given during our time at the College; very much appreciated.

 

 

7. Gilchesters’ Farmhouse/Miche

30kg dough scaled off as loaves of 1350g, 950g and 700g

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Wheat Levain

 

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

25

4375

Water

15

2625

TOTAL

40

7000

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Wheat Levain [from above]

40

7000

Gilchesters’ Organic Farmhouse Flour

75

13125

Salt

1.6

280

Water

58

10150

TOTAL

174.6

30555

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

25

-

% overall hydration

73

-

% wholegrain flour [approx 85% extraction]

75

-

FACTOR

 

175

 

Method:

  • Build leaven as schedule.
  • Using a Spiral Mixer, combine the Farmhouse flour and water for 3 minutes on first speed, then autolyse for 1 hour.   Add leaven to Autolyse and mix for 5 minutes on first speed.   Add the salt and mix a further 4 – 7 minutes on first speed.   Scrape down the bowl as necessary.   DDT 26°C.
  • Bulk proof 2½ hours; S&F after 1 and 2 hours.
  • Scale, divide and mould round.   Rest 15 minutes, covered, and prepare the bannetons.   Re-mould dough pieces and place upside down in bannetons.
  • Final proof 2 – 3 hours.
  • Score top with an “A” and bake on the sole of a deck oven with steam.
  • Cool on wires.

 

 

8. Gilchesters’ White Levain

 

17kg dough scaled off as loaves of 1350g, 950g and 700g

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Wheat Levain

 

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

35

3500

Water

21

2100

TOTAL

56

5600

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Wheat Levain [from 1 above]

56

5600

Gilchesters’ Organic Pizza/Ciabatta Flour

65

6500

Salt

1.6

160

Water

47

4700

TOTAL

169.6

16960

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

35

-

% overall  hydration

68

-

% wholegrain flour

-

-

FACTOR

-

100

 

Method:

  • Build leaven as described.
  • Combine all the final dough materials in a spiral mixer on first speed for 3 minutes, scraping down the bowl and rotating as necessary.   Mix a further 5 minutes on second speed to develop the dough.   DDT 26°C.
  • Bulk ferment for 2½ hours.
  • Scale, divide and mould.   Rest 15 minutes and prepare bannetons.   Re-mould and put into bannetons.   Retard overnight.
  • Final proof 1½ hours.
  • Tip each loaf out onto the peel and score the top.   Bake on the sole of a deck oven with steam.
  • Cool on wires.

 

9. Pain de Campagne with Wheat Levain and Rye Sourdough

 

14kg dough scaled off as loaves of 1350g, 950g and 700g

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1a Wheat Levain

60% hydration

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

28

2333

Water

16.8

1400

TOTAL

44.8

3733

 

 

 

1b Rye Sourdough

167% hydration

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

2

167

Water

3.3

275

TOTAL

5.3

442

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Wheat Levain [from 1a]

44.8

3733

Rye Sourdough [from 1b]

5.3

442

T80 Biologique

60

5000

Gilchesters’ Organic Farmhouse

10

833

Salt

1.5

125

Water

50

4165

TOTAL

171.6

14298

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

30

-

% overall hydration

69

-

% wholegrain flour

11.6

-

FACTOR

-

83.3

 

Method:

  • Prepare the levains as schedule.   Make an “autolyse” with final dough flour and water plus the rye sourdough
  • Combine wheat levain and autolyse in the mixer on first speed for 5 minutes.   Add the salt, mix 2 minutes on first and 3 minutes on second speed.
  • Bulk ferment for 2½ hours; S&F after 1 and 2 hours.
  • Scale and divide; mould round.   Rest 15 minutes and prepare large bannetons.   Re-mould and set for final proof in bannetons.
  • Final proof 1½ hours.   Pre-heat oven.
  • Tip onto peel, Bake in deck oven with steam.
  • Cool on wires.

 

10. Moscow Rye Bread

6 panned loaves

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1a] Rye Sourdough

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

30

960

Water

50

1600

TOTAL

80

2560

 

 

 

1b] “Scald”

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

13

416

Red Rye Malt

7

224

Blackstrap Molasses

1

32

Caraway Seeds

0.1

3

Boiling Water

35

1120

TOTAL

56.1

1795

 

 

 

2. “Sponge”

 

 

Rye Sourdough [from 1a]

80

2560

“Scald” [from 1b]

56.1

1795

TOTAL

136.1

4355

 

 

 

3. Final Paste

 

 

“Sponge” [from 2]

136.1

4355

Shipton Mill Organic Light Rye Flour

50

1600

Salt

1.25

40

TOTAL

187.35

5995

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

30 + 20 = 50

-

% overall hydration

85

-

% wholegrain flour

50 + 50[997]

-

FACTOR

-

32

 

Method:

  • Build the sourdough as described above.   Make the “scald” as follows:   combine the caraway and the red rye malt and dark rye flour.   Weigh the molasses into a pan, add water and bring to a rolling boil.   Tip this onto the flour mix, and add any extra boiling water if there is evaporation.   Stir well to ensure full gelatinisation.   Cover and cool.
  • Once sufficiently cool, add the scald to the sour to make the sponge.   Cover and leave to ferment for 4 hours.
  • For the final paste combine the sponge with remaining flour and the salt, mix with the paddle beater in an upright machine, 2 minutes on first speed and 2 minutes on second speed.   Scrape down the bowl to ensure thorough mixing.
  • Bulk proof for 1 hour with DDT at 28°C.
  • Scale and divide, shape and place in bread pans prepared with lining of shortening and coating of rye flour.   Smooth off the top and attach lids.
  • Final proof for just 1 hour at 28°C, then bake.
  • Pre-heat the oven to 280°C.   Load the pans, apply steam, and leave for 10 minutes.   Then turn the oven down to 100°C.   Keep a supply of steam in the oven and bake for a total of 6 to 16 hours.   Or bake in the dead wood-fired oven.
  • Cool on wires; wrap in linen and leave 24 hours before cutting into the bread.

 

11. Borodinsky using the Auerman Process

 

6 panned loaves

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1a] Rye Sourdough

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

30

900

Water

50

1500

TOTAL

80

2400

 

 

 

1b] “Scald”

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

15

450

Red Rye Malt

5

150

Blackstrap Molasses

6

180

Crushed Coriander Seeds

1

30

Boiling Water

35

1050

TOTAL

62

1860

 

 

 

2. “Sponge”

 

 

Rye Sourdough [from 1a]

80

2400

“Scald” [from 1b]

62

1860

TOTAL

142

4260

 

 

 

3. Final Paste

 

 

“Sponge” [from 2]

142

4260

Shipton Organic Light Rye Flour [997]

50

1500

Salt

1.2

36

TOTAL

193.2

5796

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

30 + 20 = 50

-

% overall hydration

85

-

% wholegrain flour

50 [+ 50 type997]

-

FACTOR

-

30

 

Method:

  • Build the sourdough as described above.   Make the “scald” as follows:   crush the coriander and add it to the red rye malt and dark rye flour.   Weigh the molasses into a pan, add water and bring to a rolling boil.   Tip this onto the flour mix, and add any extra boiling water if there is evaporation.   Stir well to ensure full gelatinisation.   Cover and cool.
  • Once sufficiently cool, add the scald to the sour to make the sponge.   Cover and leave to ferment for 4 hours @ 35°C.
  • For the final paste combine the sponge with remaining flour and the salt, mix with the paddle beater in an upright machine, 2 minutes on first speed and 2 minutes on second speed.   Scrape down the bowl to ensure thorough mixing.
  • Bulk proof for 2 hours with DDT at 28°C.
  • Scale and divide into 6.   Shape and drop into Sandwich Pans, prepared with lining of shortening and coating of rye flour.   Smooth off and top with freshly crushed Coriander seeds, then apply lids.
  • Final proof for 2 hours at 28°C, then bake.
  • Pre-heat the oven to 280°C.   Load the pans; apply steam, after 10 minutes turn the oven down to 110°C.   Keep a supply of steam in the oven and bake for 6 hours.
  • Cool on wires; wrap in linen and leave 24 hours before cutting into the bread.

 

12. Black Pumpernickel Bread

6 panned loaves

Material

Formula [% of “flour”]

Recipe [grams]

1a. Rye Sour Dough

 

 

Dark Rye Flour

30

900

Water

50

1500

TOTAL

80

2400

 

 

 

1b. “Altus”

 

 

Old Rye Bread

11

330

Hot Water

15

450

Blackstrap Molasses

4

120

TOTAL

30

900

 

 

 

1c. Soaked, Cooked Rye Berries

 

 

Whole Rye Berries

20

600

Water

20

600

TOTAL

40

1200

 

 

 

2. “Sponge”

 

 

Rye Sourdough [from 1a]

80

2400

“Altus” [from 1b]

30

900

Soaked, Cooked Rye Berries

40

1200

TOTAL

150

4500

 

 

 

3. Final Paste

 

 

Sponge [from 2]

150

4500

Salt

1.6

48

Rye Flakes

25

750

Light Rye

25

750

TOTAL

201.6

6048

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

30

-

% overall hydration

85

-

% wholegrain

75 [+ 25]

[Light Rye 997]

FACTOR

-        

30

 

Method:

  • Build the sour according to the schedule.   For the “Altus”, dissolve the molasses in the hot water, then soak the bread in the liquor overnight.   Soak the whole rye grain overnight in cold water.   Wash the grain through, and then simmer for 45 minutes.   The cooked grain should have no residual liquid, and it should double in weight from original weighing.
  • To make the “sponge”, combine sourdough, Altus and cooked grains and store, covered, for 4 hours at 35°C.
  • To make the final paste, add salt, light rye flour and chopped rye grains to the sponge.
  • Bulk ferment at 32 - 35°C for 1 hour.
  • Scale and divide into large Pullman Pans and attach lids.
  • Final proof for 1 hour at 35°C, then bake.
  • Pre-heat the oven to 280°C.   Load the pan, apply steam, and turn the oven down to 110°C.   Keep a supply of steam in the oven and bake for a total of 4½ - 6 hours.
  • Cool on wires; wrap in linen and leave 24 hours before cutting into the bread.

 

In the end it was not possible to bake the loaves overnight.   So we baked them through before going on to East Yorkshire.   I am afraid I rather over baked these loaves as a result!

 

13. Ciabatta/Focaccia

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1a. Biga

 

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

30

1380

Water

18

828

Fresh Yeast

0.2

9

TOTAL

48.2

2217

 

 

 

1b. Rye Sourdough

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

3

138

Water

5

230

TOTAL

8

368

 

 

 

2a. Final Dough – “Bassinage”

 

 

Biga – from 1a above]

48.2

2217

Rye Sourdough – from 1b above]

8

368

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

20

920

Gilchesters’ Organic Ciabatta Flour

40

1840

Gilchesters’ Organic Farmhouse Flour

4

184

Gilchesters’ Organic Coarse Semolina

3

138

Salt

1.78

82

Fresh Yeast

2.72

125

Water

43

1978

TOTAL

170.7

7852

 

 

 

2b Final Dough – super-hydration

 

 

Final Dough – “Bassinage”

170.78

7852

Water

19

874

TOTAL

189.78

8726

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

33

-

% overall hydration

85

-

% “wholegrain”

9

-

FACTOR

-

46

 To make: 12 “Ciabatta” loaves and 2 full sheets of “Rosemary and “Rock Salt Focaccia”

 

14. Spicy Buns

 

48 buns @ 70g each

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe[grams]

1. FERMENT

 

 

Strong White Bread Flour

20

240

Caster Sugar

5

60

Fresh Yeast

8

96

Water @ 38°C

45

540

TOTAL

78

936

2. FINAL DOUGH

 

 

Ferment [from above]

78

936

Strong White Bread Flour

80

960

Salt

1

12

Milk Powder

8

96

Butter

15

180

Egg

15

180

Caster Sugar

15

180

Cinnamon

1

12

Nutmeg

1

12

Sultanas

33

396

Raisins

17

204

Mixed Peel

17

204

TOTAL

281

3372

3. STOCK SYRUP

 

 

Caster Sugar

-

150

Water

-

150

 

 

 

FACTOR

-

12

 

Method:

  • Make the sponge [flying ferment]: Weigh out the water, making sure temperature is correct.   Dissolve the yeast into the water.   Add the flour and sugar, and whisk to a smooth batter.   Cover and leave in a warm place for 45 minutes
  • Weigh the other ingredients: blend the flour with the other dry ingredients.   Cut the butter into small pieces and rub roughly through the dry ingredients.   Weigh the egg separately.   Weigh the dried fruit separately.
  • Add the egg and dry ingredients to the risen sponge, and combine to form a soft and strong dough.   Mix for 3 minutes on first speed and 8 minutes on second speed to develop, scraping down the bowl as necessary.
  • Rest the dough for 20 minutes, and then use a metal cutter to cut through the dough and add the fruit.
  • Rest the dough for 40 minutes.   Scale and divide into 70g pieces
  • Mould each dough piece round, and rest covered for 15 minutes.   Prepare 3 baking sheets for the oven.   Pre-heat the oven [180°C, or, 160°C for a fan oven]
  • Re-mould dough pieces and tray-up on baking sheets lined with silicone paper [baking parchment].   Brush the tops of the dough pieces with beaten egg and cover.
  • Final proof in a warm environment for 1½ to 2 hours.
  • Bake for 15 – 20 minutes
  • Glaze with sugar syrup immediately after baking.
  • Cool on wires.

 

15. Chollah; 6 and 8 Strand Plaits

 

4 of each

 

MATERIAL

% OF FLOUR

GRAMS

1. FERMENT

 

 

Strong White Bread Flour

20

800

Water @ 38°C

32

1280

Fresh Yeast

8

320

Sugar

5

200

TOTAL

65

2600

2.FINAL DOUGH

 

 

Ferment

65

2600

Strong White Bread Flour

80

3200

Milk Powder

5

200

Salt

1

40

Sugar

5

200

Butter

10

400

Eggs

28

1120

TOTAL

194

7760

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oven profile: bake in the deck oven at 175°C, top heat 6, bottom heat 5 for 28 minutes.   No steam, draw the damper for the last 5 minutes

 

Method:

  • Whisk all the ingredients for the ferment together in a steel bowl.
  • Cover with cling film and set in a warm place for half an hour.
  • Mix all the ingredients, together with the ferment, in an upright machine with a hook; 2 minutes on first speed, then scrape down; 6 minutes on 3rd speed.   A spiral mixer is a good alternative.
  • Rest, covered, for 15 minutes, then scale into 970g pieces and divide each into 2, 3, 4, 5,  6, 7, or 8 equal sized pieces, depending on the number of strands in your plait.   Try to avoid using any flour on the bench during this and subsequent stages.
  • Mould round, cover and rest 5 minutes.
  • Line trays with silicone paper.   Roll out strands to 11” and plait according to instructions.
  • Double brush with beaten egg.   Top with poppy seeds.  Set to prove.
  • Prove 50 – 60 minutes at 35 - 40°C, 85%rH.
  • Bake as oven profile.
  • Cool on wires.

 

16. Croissant Dough

We made a selection of Croissants, Pain Amandes, Pain aux Chocolats and some Palmiers.   We made the croissant dough on day one, and refrigerated overnight, laminating the dough to make the final products on day two.

MATERIAL

FORMULA [% OF FLOUR]

RECIPE [GRAMS]

Strong White Flour

100

2400

Salt

1.3

32

Milk Powder

5

120

Yeast

6

144

Cold Water

63

1512

SUB-TOTAL

175.3

4208

Concentrated Butter

41.7

1000

TOTAL

217

5208

 

Method:

  • Mix the ingredients for the dough to form cool, developed dough.
  • Put in a plastic bag in the chiller and retard overnight. Roll out the slab of butter and put back in the chiller.
  • Roll the dough out to a rectangle 8mm thick.   Put the butter slab onto 2/3 of the rectangle, and fold in 3, letter style.
    • Turn the dough piece clockwise through 90°.   Roll out to the same size as before, fold as above, and turn.   Repeat once more.
    • Chill the billet for half an hour and give 2 more folds and half turns as described.   This gives 168 layers of butter in the croissant dough.   Chill again for half an hour.
    • Roll the dough piece out to 5mm and use a croissant cutter to cut out triangle shapes.   Stack into piles of 6 and rest covered for 2-3 minutes.
    • Tease out each triangle, fold up the top edge and roll up tightly.   Roll out the feet to pointed ends and move round so these feet join up to make the classic shape.
    • Place on silicone lined baking sheets and brush with beaten egg.
    • Prove at 38-40°C, 80%rH for 40 minutes.
    • Bake in a hot oven, 235°C for 12-15 minutes

     

     

    This is a longer slideshow covering our baking activities in Leeds.

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qVtUz_2I_jY

    We hurried back up north after a completely full-on day to rendezvous with Alison plus her Sister, Beverley, and her daughter, Eve.   They go to Powburn Show every year, with Eve keen to take part in a number of the competitions taking place; including the wrestling!   We went to our nearest good pub, the Tankerville Arms, at Eglingham, for some great food and I enjoyed some fine local ale.

     

    However, I had to rise very early in order to finish off all of the display work and the price list to take to the Show the next day.

     

    The weather was perfect, in contrast to last year.   It took 2 car loads to transport all the bread to the Show, and I had a customer in between deliveries, coming to visit me at home, all the way from Edinburgh.

     

    Our next-door neighbour, Anna, has been a great supporter of the Bread and Roses venture, and she came along as a key part of the day’s sales team….I can’t thank you enough, Anna!

     

    And, we sold a lot of bread and baked goodies on the day.   To finish a very long post, here are some photographs of the stall, and the team in action.

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8D8IT4n_crI

    Thank you so much to all involved: Joe and the Leeds team, my parents, Anna, to Shuffles, Beverley and Eve.   To Alison of course, for her love, and never-ending patience.   And to Codruta; we so enjoyed having you to stay.

     

    My very best wishes to you all

    Andy

Comments

davidg618's picture
davidg618

It me be just me, but I only see the title of your posting. No text, no pictures.

David G

nycbaker11's picture
nycbaker11

No text either

 

Ray

foodslut's picture
foodslut

No text to be seen here, either.

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Folks,

Sorry about the delay getting this up.   I had already contacted Floyd, and he has mailed me to say he is confident that it is now fixed.   I have noticed that the drawing accompanying the croissant formula has not copied over.   I will take that out, as I have a detailed post on lamination on my blog, here: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/16082/laminated-yeasted-dough-construction

Thank you to those who made me aware they too could not see the post.   I hope everyone is able to access it now.   Maybe the length of the post led to the problems?

Best wishes

Andy

breadforfun's picture
breadforfun

Thanks, Andy,  for letting us be the proverbial fly on the wall for what must have been a really busy and productive week.  Your slide shows are almost as good looking as your breads.  And your formulas are always a welcome addition.  Did you find any interesting breads on Paxos?

-Brad

 

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Brad,

Many thanks for your comments.

We were staying near Lakka, which is one of 3 small resorts on the NE coast.   There were 2 bakeries in the town, one being a single-hand operation which I managed to sneak a look inside, to observe an oblique action fork mixer and a deck oven.   The bread at this bakery was very average; we bought a loaf of supposed "black bread", which had some rye flour in the mix.   It was made in the style of a hearth bread, but its shape and soft crust suggested use of certain additives, and the crumb colour was almost certainly derived from caramel [or possibly treacle if I were to be really kind].

The other bakery shop was run by a "fuornos", a wood-fired bakery, based up in the hills in a local town.   They also had a shop at near-by Loggos.   We bought a brown baton from this shop on the first day, and it was dry and over-baked.   However, it made great rusk to dunk in tomato salads, for dakkos!   We also bought a wholemeal loaf from the same place late in the holiday and it was quite superb.   It was rustic, and hardly shaped, baked batch-style.   The crust was soft, and the light crumb suggested a dough made in the style of ciabatta.   We brought some back with us; I guess it must have kept fresh for around 5 days!

All good wishes

Andy

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

you keeping your apprentices on their professional toes and learning every facet of the business.  Nice variety of breads for her to kearn from.  i'm guessing codruta will look back on her time working with you and your wife fondly and hold it dear.

Nice baking as usual Andy

 

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi dabrownman,

Thank you for your kind words.   And yes, as you suggested would be the case, I learnt a good bit from Codruta too.

Best wishes

Andy

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

As always everything outstanding.  I loved veiwing the slides.  Everyone looks very content.  You are very fortunate to have such a talent and beautiful countryside!

My very best to everyone,

Sylvia

ananda's picture
ananda

Thank you very much for your kind words Sylvia; it's lovely to hear from you as always.

I so wish we had more of the type of weather we enjoyed when Codruta was here; it makes so much difference when it comes to enjoying the beauty of Northumberland!

All good wishes

Andy

CJtheDeuce's picture
CJtheDeuce

It's great to see & read about a week in the life of a real baker in the UK . The success of internships like this are of great importance to Codruta & myself that want to have a shop of their own but lack real world experience. Thanks for sharing your art with others

  Charlie

ananda's picture
ananda

Hello Charlie,

Thank you for your great comments, and I wish you well as you strive to achieve your dreams

Best wishes

Andy

Franko's picture
Franko

Hi Andy,

 Well I think you've really outdone yourself with this post my friend. A great story of you and Codruta finally getting a chance to work together, terrific photos, awesome breads along with the recipes to make them, you've got it all going on with this one Andy. What a terrific experience, not only for Codruta and yourself, but for everyone involved. Thanks for taking the time to write it all up and sharing it with us and I'm looking forward to reading Codruta's impressions of her visit when she has a chance to post them.

All the best,

Franko

ananda's picture
ananda

Many thanks for your kind words as ever Franko,

We've been away for the August Bank Holiday, so, my apologies for the delay in getting up replies to yours, and everybody else's lovely comments.

My thoughts are that Codruta has been kept very busy at the Back Home Bakery, as I have not heard from her since she returned to Paris after staying with us in Powburn.

All good wishes to you

Andy

Juergen Krauss's picture
Juergen Krauss

Andy, 

You and your team have been unbelievably busy! 

What a great variety of goods, all baked with happy faces! And the logistics of it all...

Thank you for letting us witness.

Juergen

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Juergen,

It was indeed a team effort, and I am grateful to all for their help.

Yes, the logistics were a challenge, as Leeds is well over 2 hours' drive from Powburn, and it is a further hour plus on to my parents' house.   Still, it's great to have a wood-fired oven on the back patio; no travelling to get to work on this!

Good to hear from you, and thank you for you kind comments.

All good wishes

Andy

Juergen Krauss's picture
Juergen Krauss

Hi Andy,

The photo of Codruta holding up the window pane inspired me to look at my kneading, and I made some very nice Campagnes since.

I also had a first go at your Moscow Rye - Baked the night from Monday to Tuesday it now (Wednesday night) starts to develop its richness. Great formula, but difficult to schedule in my circumstances.

Best Wishes,

Juergen

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Juergen,

The ring on the finger tells me that it is me holding up the window pane.   Codruta took nearly all the photos, thankfully.

I'm hoping that video will be embedded shortly, as I suspect many have missed it so far, in such a big post.

For the Moscow Rye, I prepare the "scald" very early in the morning, and mix it on second speed to allow it to cool sufficiently to be able to add the sour quickly and achieve a mix temp of c.32*C.   Leave that for 4 hours, then mix the final paste.   Usually bulk time is up to 2 hours, and the same for the final ferment.   This allows me to load them to the brick oven as soon as all the "hearth breads" have been baked.   I fully appreciate the 3-stage process is not easy for many home bakers to accommodate into a daily work/life schedule.

Yes, I think I prefer the Moscow Rye; the spice is subtle, and it is not so bittersweet either.   It is leading me to take another look at the Borodinsky formula.

Really good to hear from you again

All good wishes

Andy

Juergen Krauss's picture
Juergen Krauss

Hi Andy,

Thank you for your reply.

The taste and texture of my Moscow Rye are getting better every day.

Your remarks about scheduling are helpful, but I have one more question: Do you mix the scald when the rye sour is fully developed, or earlier?

Best Wishes,

Juergen

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Juergen,

Ordinarily, I prepare the scald just proir to mixing the Sponge; the rye sour is already fully fermented.   I weigh the flour, rye malt and spice directly into the mixing bowl, and attach it to mixer with a paddle beater.   I then weigh the molasses into a pan, pour on correct amount of boiling water, and bring contents to the boil on the cooker top.   I check to see if there has been any moisture loss, pour on the boiling watery syrup and mix the scald through.   I then scrape down, and turn the mixer up to speed 2 and mix for 10 minutes to cool the scald down a little.   Then I pour on the ripened sourdough and mix thoroughly to form the sponge.   I aim to have a mixed temperature of 33*C in the sponge, which gets it off to a flying start.   It will cool to around 30*C in my kitchen in the 4 hour fermentation period prior to mixing the final paste.

Best wishes

Andy

Juergen Krauss's picture
Juergen Krauss

for your detailed answer. 

That makes it alll clear.

I'll make another batch this weekend

Best Wishes,

Juergen

Mebake's picture
Mebake

That must be the longest post i've ever come across here on TFL, Andy.. And i enjoyed every bit of it.

Those are some massive doughs, at 17, 20 kgs. I hope that codruta wasn't involved in the actual labor. This some serious effort, andy.. Being immersed into the world of bread, and with such a huge variety! I hope codruta learned the most during her brief visit. 

How kind  of you to post all the recipes. Hazelnut/ brazilnut and prune bread , and spicy buns are two recipes i'm eagerly looking forward to trying. Your gilchester miches, ryes.. Have to wait until i find a source for high extraction flours, and red malt.

 

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Khalid,

The Gilchesters' Farmhouse dough was upward of 30kg, I believe.   Codruta wants to run a bakery; of course she was involved in the actual labour...all of it!   I knew she had the talent already in spades; she came to experience working in a bakery, and I really hope that is what I provided for her.

Many thanks for your generous comments about the post

All good wishes

Andy

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

WOW,  You have really outdone yourself with this magnificent post!  What a joy to read about your work, play and life all in one posting.

Thank you so much for posting the formulas too.  Wonderful breads to add to my line up for my fall baking :-)

I also want to thank you for something you told me a year or so ago about baker's math.  Your comment was that by simply looking at a formula you could tell all about a dough and how it would behave and turn out.....I was clueless.  It all just looked like a bunch of numbers to me and math was never my forte.  Well, I did begin writing all of my recipes up using the method you outlined and, as you well know, it all makes beautiful sense to me now. Finally a practical way to use the math I was taught in school so many years ago.

Take Care,

Janet

ananda's picture
ananda

Thank you Janet,

and I know the method I use to write up formulae is not quite in line with BBGA, but it is what makes most sense to me, and I am glad it has helped you along the way too.

Very best wishes

Andy

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hello Andy,
What a whirlwind of production! The breads, formulae, instruction, facilities and hospitality: all top-notch!
You are so generous, and kind, to share your time and knowledge with Codruta, to help her get her start with her bakery.
The photos are lovely and I hope you had a wonderful holiday in Greece.
:^) breadsong

 

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi breadsong,

We had a fabulous holiday, here is a little evidence:

 

As always thank you for all your kind and generous comments

Best wishes to you

Andy

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hi Andy,
Don't you both look happy - those Mediterranean waters look beyond compare!
So glad you enjoyed your holiday - it looks like it was perfect - thanks for sharing the photos!
:^) breadsong

isand66's picture
isand66

Andy,

What a terrific post and wonderful collection of breads you and Codruta created.

Thank you for taking the time to write your post as I know how time consuming they can be and mine are small in comparison.

One question about the Chollah bread you made, is that supposed to be Challah bread or is it a bread I have not heard of?  If it's just a typo I certainly understand.

Regards,
Ian

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Ian,

Yes, I suppose the post did take some time to put together, although, in truth, most of that was editing the photos, which I would do anyway, just to store them on the pc.   Being on holiday really prevented me from doing too much editing, as I wanted to be outside enjoying the sunshine, and you can't see a computer screen properly outdoors in lovely hot Greece!   The formulae were already written up, so just needed pasting in; although they didn't always arrive in the same state I had copied them, so, some tinkering was usually necessary.

I don't claim any insider knowledge about the name "Chollah", however, I was given the formula by Andrew Whitley, who is a very knowledgeable baker who I have worked with for many years.   It is very much the pronounciation I associate with in the UK.   I am thinking that UK and US English are spoken very differently; maybe that is why I use "chollah" where you are familiar with "challah"?

Thank you for your comments, good to hear from you as always

Andy

Ruralidle's picture
Ruralidle

Hi Andy

That is one mega post but it is really lovely to read.  I am so pleased that your time with Codruta went well, you certainly make a whole bunch of fantastic loaves.  They look delicious.  I am sure that Codruta will have learned a lot and will greatly benefit from the experience when she starts her own business.  I hope, also, that you and Alison enjoyed your holiday, with plently of good wine, bread and food (not to mention weather).

Best Wishes to you both.

 

ananda's picture
ananda

Hello Richard,

Lovely to hear from you and thank you for your ever-generous words.

I posted a couple of photos up in my reply to Breadsong.   Yes, of course the weather was hot and sunny; in contrast to the UK weather this summer [??]

Very best wishes to you

Andy

hanseata's picture
hanseata

and a lot of great breads!

I'm all for the Brazil Nut & Prune Bread, and my husband wants me to bake the Moscow Rye (he loved the bread when he visited Moscow.)

And, yes, you can get withdrawal symptoms when you are cut off from the internet!

Karin

 

 

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Karin,

I'm already looking forward to seeing you post on Moscow Rye; I'm sure you would make a fantastic job of it.   Are you able to source Red Rye Malt?   That is an important part of the formula, although Crystal Barley Malt will get you started, but it is very different to the rye, of course.

We've been in the heart of the Yorkshire Dales for Bank Holiday, celebrating an old friend's 50th Birthday...24 of us!   No Internet, or, Mobile Phone!!!

I was appointed baker, not surprisingly!   I took 6 Gilchester Miches and 5 Moscow Rye breads, and still had to bake more for the last day!   And I also made a selection of Naan breads and Chapatis for the fabulous curry we all feasted on for the final evening.

All good wishes

Andy

davidg618's picture
davidg618

I've been following this thread daily since its posting, watching and reading the praise and well wishes pile up. I feel like the standup comic who had to follow the funniest routine he had every wittnessed. He came on stage, stared motionless at the audience for  long time. Then he jerked his thumb in the direction the previous comic had exited and said, "Everything he said, goes twice for me."

I do have one aditional word though.

WOW!

Regards,

David G

ananda's picture
ananda

Hello David,

I appreciate that you were the first to alert me that the post wasn't showing for you [it didn't show up for me, and I had already contacted Floyd], and I am grateful for that.

What I appreciate most of all is that you came back and wrote such kind words; thank you very much for that.

All good wishes

Andy

kai1001's picture
kai1001

Hi Andy.
I am a big fan or your site for some time. I copied, rescaled and edited many of your rye recipes for my likeing and I have never been disappointment, that you for that! This blog is definstely one of the best out there, keep up the fantastic work.

Now to my problem ;)
I tried the Borodinsky for the first time, so I followed your procedure very closely. I live in Hawaii, its a bit more moist and warm here, so usually I can shorten times. After mixing the scald with the sour, I was suppried how the spunge exploded in very short time, very active and it was fun to watch. The first proofing doubled in about 1:45 hours. Then however, something didnt not go as planned.

I scraped the dough into my large pullman pan. Usuallly 1500g fill it up a bit below half (I scale your recipe by 1/4), and this time I was right on the money too. I noticed that the dough was a bit dryer than the usual rye but I did not act on that. Turns out that the final proff did not really do its job and I cant explain why. It only rose 2/5 to the top after 2 hours. Do you think it was because I lacked hydration? I never had this problem. My sours are usuallly very potent, however usually I let the first proof happen in the fridge over night. When I dont pay attention at the second proff, the sour forces its way out of the slides between the closed lid. Perhaps you can shed some light on it?

That was the something that didnt go so well. The taste, on the other hand, is dead on. Big fan! We all loved it at our house. I will try your Moskow Rye next, but am hoping that I can find my error or, when everything else fails, I will just try again.

All the best,
keep on baking!
~kai

 

ananda's picture
ananda

Hello Kai,

and thank you very much for your kind and generous comments.

I am deeply jealous of the climate where you live, as it is currently raining here, and has been for the last 24 hours, relentlessly.   The temperature is around 5*C outside!

If I were you I would look to achieve a mix temperature of between 28 and 32*C when you make your Sponge.   Then you need to hold it at that temperature.   Given your tropical climate, you may need to be working cooler than this...you will have a lot more experience here than I have.   My experience is that rye paste works better at a warmer temperature, and can easily become "stuck" if it gets too cold.   Not something I experience in the UK, but if the paste is too warm, then yeast activity will die off.

My 100% Rye breads all have a hydration of around 85%.   From experience, I have found that anything higher and the loaves become difficult to bake out.   Stiff rye paste tends to be reluctant to prove, so it is tempting to let it down by adding water.   But experience tells me this is not the way to go.   However, lower hydration really does not work at all.

I think you are right that it is not easy to judge activity levels in the second and third phases of fermenting the rye paste.   The rye sour should be fully fermented.   The Sponge should be vigorous, and working at the right temperature.   If you have these conditions and the paste seems stiff, then you may be using poor quality flour.   If the flour has been ground too finely, for instance, then there could be excess starch damage which may lead to unwanted amylase activity.

Thank you again; my best wishes for the Holiday, and for 2013.

Andy

kai1001's picture
kai1001

Hi Andy,

You would be surprised how hard it is to get good flour here without breaking your wallet. Some of these prices lean on $3-4 / lb at the store, so bulk internet orders are the only option left. I went with Arrowhead Mills Rye Flour Organic, and its perhaps a poor choice since it is very light. I will look to add more medium, coursely grinds as your recipe suggests. I think you are right with your starge damage suggestion. Though the first rise was good, I was surprised about the activity given the stiffness of the dough. I will try again with a bit more water in and bake tomorrow evening, and again next when I upgrade my flour.

This is a shot of the bread. The pictures doesn't do its justice though, it is way too good. It looks like a regular pullman bread, but its more like a minimi. If you look closer, most expansion occured in the center, leaving a ring on all sides where activity was low. That's why it did not reach its predicted height.

 

As for your other suggestions: I doubt that I mixed the sponge at that high temperature because I did boil my water in a kettle and pourd it into the cold pan with the molasses. Hawaii is more sub tropical at best, given a yearly variation from about 22-33 deg Celcius. We live in a Valley where its cooler, so I will do my best to keep the sponge in a low cooling oven.

Thank you for your suggestions, I really appreciate it. One can see that you are very passionate about this and it shows!
Aloha,
~kai

kai1001's picture
kai1001

Hi Andy,

I just wanted to post, in appreciation, some pictures of the Pumpernickel I made using your recipe. I used a scale factor of 10 for the larger pullman pann (1 think 13 inch in length) and it turns out fantastic, giving me a 1.7 kg loaf. I use only coarse and medium rye grinds among berries and flakes.
Many thanx,
~kai


ananda's picture
ananda

Great work Kai,

Thank you so much for posting your lovely bread

Best wishes

Andy

jkandell's picture
jkandell

Andy, two quick questions about your Russian breads. Is your moscow rye  basically a borodinsky with caraway instead of coriander? The process and proportions look very similar, especially that extra sponge step I associate with borodinsky. 

Also curious why you add molasses to the scald rather than the final mix per auermann, royter et al? I'm guessing so the thick molasses can dissolve?  

 

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi jkandell,

No, the Moscow Rye is a prescribed State formula, like the Borodinsky: http://www.indiana.edu/~pollang/Russian_bread_table.pdf

I am afraid I do not read Russian, and when I worked on these formulae I had to second guess a few things.   There is much guidance available, but not reading Russian is quite restrictive.   I want to cite my sources here, but I am just really tired and need some sleep; so that will have to wait.   However, I can safely say I have never had problems dissolving the molasses in boiling water.   One of the reasons I added at this second stage was for ease.   A second was to provide immediate sugar source to quick start the secondary fermentation.   I took that to be a fundamental part of the process.

All good wishes

Andy