The Fresh Loaf

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Can anyone help me come up with the best possible, gluten, wheat, yeast, soy, sugar free bread?

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Golfer4588's picture
Golfer4588

Can anyone help me come up with the best possible, gluten, wheat, yeast, soy, sugar free bread?

Hi,

I am an absolute bread fanatic but recently discovered that some long term health problems I have could be dramatically improved by eliminating some foods.

I have attempted to make my own bead using some of the ingredients below but the results were not very good to say the least!

I am not expecting miracles but can anyone help me come up with the best possible, gluten, wheat, yeast, soy, sugar free bread?

 I can have anything from the list below?

Many thanks

 

Richard

Flours

  • Coconut flour
  • Oat bran flour
  • Brown rice bran flour
  • Tef or teff flour
  • Buckwheat flour
  • Millet flour
  • Almond flour
  • Flaxseed flour
  • Ground Hemp Seeds

Fats, oils and liquids

  • Coconut oil
  • Olive oil
  • Sesame oil
  • Yogurt
  • Coconut butter
  • Coconut milk
  • Condensed coconut cream
  • Ghee
  • Eggs
  • Water  

Rising agents and thickener/binder

  • Guar gum
  • Aluminium free baking soda
  • Aluminium free baking powder

Seasoning, spices and herbs

  • Sea salt
  • Black pepper
  • Allspice
  • Basil
  • Bay leaf
  • Cardamom
  • Cilantro (Coriander)
  • Cinnamon
  • Cloves
  • Cumin
  • Fennel
  • Ginger
  • Garlic
  • Nutmeg
  • Oregano
  • Parsley
  • Turmeric
  • Thyme
  • Rosemary

Sweeteners and flavourings

  • Apple cider vinagar
  • Raw Stevia
  • Truvia
Crider's picture
Crider

After chancing on a recipe for Jowar Roti. The common method is to swell the starches by using almost-boiling water to make a dough. Then it is rolled out to a flatbread and cooked on a flat pan. I had difficulty rolling them out well, but realized my tortilla press made it effortless. There's lots of recipes online and on youtube for making rotis.

Jowar = sorghum
Bajra = millet 
Akki or Chawal ki = rice
Sada = teff
Makki = corn 

I'm not on a gluten-restricted diet, but I've tasted gluten free gummy loaves and don't think they hold a candle to rotis for flavor and texture.

Colin2's picture
Colin2

Rotis are great.  "Sada" just means "plain" in Hindi, and "ki" is just a little word that connects one word to other i.e. it's not specific to rice.  Akki is usually rice flour, chawal is rice.

Crider's picture
Crider

I'm still learning.

breadmantalking's picture
breadmantalking

I have been making GF breads for a while now using a mixture I have developed myself.

For 4 cups of GF bread mixture:

1 1/2 cups rice flour (use brown rice flour for whole grain breads, white rice for white breads)

1 1/2 cups tapioca flour

1 cup potato or cornflour (NOT yellow cornmeal).

This mixture can also be used, substituting directly, in recipes for cakes, and even quiche and pie crusts! Just reduce the fat content so they don't shrink during baking.

 

For a decent loaf of GF bread you can use this recipe, substituting this flour mix. The resulting loaf is quite tasty and remains moist for a few days. My celiac customers all love it!

Golfer4588's picture
Golfer4588

Thanks guys but both of your suggestions have ingredients that I cant have!

 

Thanks again

 

Richard

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Works for South Koreans.  Just serve whole leaves. They can be torn smaller and place meat and other accompaniments inside to roll up and eat.  No bread.  

MangoChutney's picture
MangoChutney

You might want to check the recipes on this rather specialized forum.

http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/

 

Felila's picture
Felila

1) Be sure that you DO have allergies. Some people are self-diagnosing allergies when they don't exist, simply because the allergies are getting news headlines. The test is whether or not you have a reaction when you don't know that you've eaten that particular ingredient. That's what nailed my sulfite allergy. I spent the afternoon in the bathroom after eating a salad at the college cafeteria ... and found out afterwards that they had used bagged, sprayed lettuce rather than chopping their own, as they usually did. If you know you've eaten something to which you might have an allergy, you can psych yourself into detecting symptoms.

2) You can't duplicate  the taste and texture of bread without gluten. So don't even try. Find tasty starches that taste good in their own right. You might try South Indian idlis, steamed rice cakes. You can buy them frozen in South Asian grocery stores. 

 

 

JeremyCherfas's picture
JeremyCherfas

And that's all I wanted to add, Felila. Well said.

Jeremy

Golfer4588's picture
Golfer4588

Thanks for all the advice guys,

I am going to persevere with looking for a recipe because it would make my diet complete!

I fully realise that making bread without gluten will never be great but my last effort using Guar gum as a gluten replacement was nearly there!

When I found this site, I thought someone could offer me at least one recipe to try?

 

Thanks again

 

Richard

MangoChutney's picture
MangoChutney

The forum at the link I supplied above is full of people who are trying to cook and bake using severe constraints, not just low carbohydrates.  People there are cooking without starch, without sugar, without yeast, without gluten, and all of the above.   They are using gums and other additives to attempt to make normal food from almost nothing, including baking bread.  It is the forum where I found advice on how to use oat fiber in my otherwise completely normal bread, which I could not obtain here.

Golfer4588's picture
Golfer4588

That's great, as soon as I get home I will have a good look!

Fingers crossed because something resembling half decent bread would make such a difference to me.

 

Thanks again

 

Richard

Golfer4588's picture
Golfer4588

Hi, please could you tell me what the benefits of the oat fiber is ?

I've had a good look but cant seem to find anything?

MangoChutney's picture
MangoChutney

Oat fiber is extracted from oat hulls.  It contains about 95% insoluble dietary fiber and 5% soluble dietary fiber.  In theory I could incorporate this additional fiber into my diet by buying unhulled grain, but in practice my flour mill turns grain husks into blackened shreds resembling the legs of insects.  This is visually repulsive, and probably nutritionally inferior to the extracted hull fiber.  Oat fiber resembles chalk dust that smells and tastes like oats.  It does not thicken gravies but does blend well with flours.

For various health reasons, my husband and I have both been tasked with literally doubling our already adequate fiber intake.  This increased level of fiber intake would be impossible to attain naturally without sustantially increasing our calorie intake.  Adding oat fiber to our diet has enabled us to reach our goal without increasing the calorie content.  In fact, I can slightly reduce the calorie content by replacing some of the total bulk instead of just making the portions larger.  In essence, this is a low-calorie filler that is good for us and comes from an otherwise inedible portion of a food which we already eat.

Breakfast Oatcake Without Oat Fiber (total recipe contains 1/2 cup hulled oat groats, milled with 1 tbls brown flax): my portion contains 7 g fiber, 219 calories
Breakfast Oatcake With Oat Fiber (total recipe contains 1/3 cup hulled oat groats, milled with 1 tbls brown flax, plus 1/4 cup oat fiber): my portion contains 16 g fiber, 183 calories

As for the health benefits of dietary fiber, I believe you should be able to find them listed many places.  *smile*

Golfer4588's picture
Golfer4588

Wow! Thank you so much.

I really need to get more fiber into my diet so what ever my final bread recipe turns out to be, oat bran is definitely in.

 

Thanks once again!

MangoChutney's picture
MangoChutney

...

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

you get high fiber and taste and more options.  I have put just about your entire list of flours into 100% rye bread.

Golfer4588's picture
Golfer4588

Hi,

 

Unfortunately I cant have rye bread.

 

Shame because I love it!

Dobeda's picture
Dobeda

Maybe it is time to open your mind/change your mindset.  When one stops eating meat, should they look for every substitute that tastes like meat but isn't? I think not. 

Golfer4588's picture
Golfer4588

Maybe it is time to open your mind/change your mindset.  When one stops eating meat, should they look for every substitute that tastes like meat but isn't? I think not.

 

Thanks for the advice, very helpful!!!

Breadandwine's picture
Breadandwine

Hi Richard

The above book, by  Andrew Whitley has a comprehensive section of GF flours - with a run-down on all a great number of GF ingredients. If you can get hold of a copy, I'm sure it'll help.

Cheers, Paul

 

Golfer4588's picture
Golfer4588

Thanks Paul,

Going straight to Amazon!

Golfer4588's picture
Golfer4588

Hi guys,

Right, this weekend I’m going to have my first attempt at making some gluten free bread.

I am going to start with one flour (Buckwheat) and add another each time thereafter.

These are the ingredients I’m going to start with,

  • Buckwheat flour
  • Eggs
  • Salt
  • Olive Oil
  • Water
  • Baking soda
  • Kiefer milk
  • Guam gum
  • Xylitol sweetener

Now I finally have the ingredients to make a start, I just have a couple of questions I hope someone may be able to help me with?

To make one standard size trial loaf?

  1. Amounts of each ingredient
  2. Needing time
  3. Type of bread tin
  4. Standing time
  5. Cooking time
  6. Cooking temp
  7. Would a bread maker be best?

Obviously not expecting miracles but hopefully this may develop in to a base that other ingredients can be slowly added to and tweaked.

Any help or advice would be very much appreciated and you never know we may come up with something that is pretty good!

 

Many thanks

Richard

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Richard, I think you should approach this project from a different angle.  The gluten you are trying to avoid is the glue that holds the bread together.  Gluten free flours are fillers and weaken the glue further.  

I might try starting with making a glue first, the part that traps gasses and work at making that glue appetizing.   Then get it to rise or loosen its gelatin structure.  And then add the fillers to soften the glue and fill in the crumb.  Don't forget to try roasting some of your gluten free flours for more flavour.

I would also use small amounts like what can go into muffin cups or small (check out toy size pans) forms before going to regular sized loaves.  

If you can find it, look for the "oopsie bread" or something similar, I believe there is no flour or yeast in it and it is predominantly made from eggs. 

Another method is to make a dense loaf, and grate it into small flakes or crumbs and then use steam to re-gel the crumb to hold itself together resulting in a cake type crumb.  No leavening needed.  Something to try with your first bricks instead of chucking them.  

Golfer4588's picture
Golfer4588

Ye, I think I'm in a bit over my head!

The only thing I was going to add as the "glue" was the guam gum but other than that I havent a clue what to try?

Better get researching the glue!

Good call about the amounts too, I hate waste and from the sounds of things the birds are going to be eating better than me.

Thanks for the help

 

Richard

MangoChutney's picture
MangoChutney

This was posted for buckwheat pancakes, but you should be able to use it as a base for your experiments.  I have paraphrased the recipe to include the corrections posted in the thread there.  I believe the recipe uses flax meal as the glue, so you can try substituting guar gum as your first experiment.

1/4 cup of linseed/flax meal
3/4 cup of pure buckwheat flour
Pinch of salt
1 tsp baking powder
1 egg
1/4 cup Splenda
1 Tbsp olive oil
about 1 cup of water

Mix the dry ingredients together except for the Splenda.  In a separate bowl beat the egg and the Splenda until blended.  Add the oil to the egg mix, followed by half of the water.  Add the liquid mixture to the dry ingredients, and mix together.  Add water until the batter is a good consistancy.

Original author: kiwimum on Low Carb Friends (http://www.lowcarbfriends.com/bbs/lowcarb-recipe-help-suggestions/778409-buckwheat-pikelets-pancakes.html)

Golfer4588's picture
Golfer4588

Thank you so much, thats great!

My doc only wants me to introduce one flour at a time so she can check me for reactions so will have to hold fire on the flax meal for a week or two.

Struggling to get me head around the "glue", I understand what it does but not what it is if that makes any sense?

 

Thanks again

 

Richard

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

lets see... any starchy non glutinous flour cooked in water works up to great "glue"   (are the wheels starting to churn yet?) 

potato, corn, rice, to name a few...  :)

Eggs also make good "glue" to stick things together.  Cheese?

 

 

MangoChutney's picture
MangoChutney

At this point I am basically looking things up for you and interpreting what I find, as I have never cooked as you are hoping to cook.  Guar gum is apparently a polysaccharide derived from a tropical bean.  This has meaning to me as a chemist but will probably leave you at a loss, so let me try to give the context.  Polysaccharides are long chains of sugars (poly = many, saccharide = sugar) which are used by plants to store calories the way animals store calories as fat, as well as to provide structure.  Thus starches are polysaccharides, but so is cellulose.  In a non-plant arena, if you have ever cultured your own kefir, you will be familiar with the rubbery, cauliflower-like matrix on which the culture lives.  This is also polysaccharide.    From this you can see that not all polysaccharides can be digested by human beings, and  that different polysaccharides have different properties, from fibrous to rubbery to gelling to thickening.  The polysaccharide in guar gum is apparently one of the kind that forms a firm gel with water.  This helps make gluten-free baked goods more flexible and moister, and not dry and crumbly.

Sorry if that was overwhelming.

Golfer4588's picture
Golfer4588

Going to need a bit of time to digest that!

 

I will have a proper read when I get home.

 

Don't apologize because the problem I am trying to solve was always going to get technical.

 

Thanks again

 

Richard

baybakin's picture
baybakin

Oh man, that takes me back.  My brother had a gluten allergy growing up (lactose as well), so we didn't really keep bread around the house, opting instead for buckwheat pancakes that sound very similar to these (but with real sugar in them, the family didn't do artificial sweeteners).

Interestingly enough he out-grew both of these allergies, and is now a pastry chef.  Strange how these things work.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

on Youtube