The Fresh Loaf

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Spelt Ciabatta with Yeast Water and Sourdough

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jarkkolaine's picture
jarkkolaine

Spelt Ciabatta with Yeast Water and Sourdough

After making my first yeast water bread, I discarded most of the yeast water, leaving about two table spoons, added a big handful of raisins and a table spoon of honey, and then filled the jar about two thirds with water. I’m not sure if this is how it’s usually done, but it worked very well: In a couple of days, the mixture had developed a very fruity and inviting smell with lots of bubbles.

I wanted to drink the liquid but resisted and started a new bread dough instead.

Following the lead of Ian and others, this time it was time to mix in some of my sourdough starter to play with the taste a bit. I was hoping to make a boule quite similar to the one I had made the first time (and usually love to make), but because of some mistakes in calculating the proportions of water and flour (I forgot to account for the water in the starter!), ended up with Ciabatta—which was actually good, as we were just about to leave on a two day trip to Tallinn, and Ciabatta makes delicious picnic sandwiches…

Anyhow, here’s the recipe. 

First build of YW starter: (evening)

  • 60 g Yeast water
  • 60 g White flour

Second build of YW starter: (about 8-10 hours after previous step, I forgot to time everything properly…)

  • All of the starter from previous step
  • 200 g Yeast water
  • 200 g White flour

Final dough: (About 4 hours later, in the afternoon)

  • 400 g YW starter (which at this point looked a lot like a regular poolish starter)
  • 100 g Sourdough starter (100% hydration, refreshed the night before)
  • 750 g Fine, rather white spelt flour
  • 700 g Water
  • 20 g Salt

The dough was quite wet, so I gave it an autolyse (it was only about 15 minutes, as I was itching to get my hands in the dough) and worked it for 20 minutes on the table.

After that, the dough rested for 4 stretch and folds at 30 minute intervals. Then I cut pieces of the dough and let them rest on a heavily floured couche for about an hour or so as the oven heated up. I baked the breads on a baking stone for 35 minutes.

...And here’s what came out from the oven:

I am very happy with the resulting flavor:  I can’t say I taste any of the fruit anymore, but it’s a little sweet, not really sour at all. And the boys liked it (filled with some salami, cheese, boiled eggs and cucumber):

Let’s see what happens next time, as the yeast is now feasting on some fresh fruit… (And looks and smells more and more like a drink! I might have to start making cider or something, soon ;))

Comments

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

is some very nice ciabatta!  It is so nice to see YW being used in so many breads.  Yours are are exceptional.  Very ncie baking.  Glad the boys like them too!

jarkkolaine's picture
jarkkolaine

Thanks, dabrownman! I think I'm falling in love with YW and its many uses :) 

isand66's picture
isand66

It is difficult to resist drinking!  I'm not sure what that would actually do to your internal organs and I rather not find out :).

Beautiful looking ciabatta!  They look perfect and obviously your two boys agree.

Regards,
Ian

jarkkolaine's picture
jarkkolaine

Yeah, I have no idea what would happen if I drank the whole thing, so I'm resisting too :)

Thanks, Ian!

isand66's picture
isand66

You gave me a good idea...at least I hope it's a good idea!  I'm working on a yeast water batch of dough using organic cherry lemonade, with some creamcheese mixed in to try and make some soft rolls.  Since my YW has cherries in it I thought of the cherry lemonade.  Wish me luck!

Congrats on the home page honor.

Ian

jarkkolaine's picture
jarkkolaine

Can't wait to see the results :) 

Jarkko

 

mamatkamal's picture
mamatkamal

Such a beautiful looking ciabatta!  One of my favourite bread!

Cheers 

jarkkolaine's picture
jarkkolaine

Thanks, mamatkamal!

Floydm's picture
Floydm

That is beautiful, and the yeast water thing is super interesting.   Would you mind if I featured this on the home page for a bit?

-Floyd 

jarkkolaine's picture
jarkkolaine

Wouldn't mind at all. It would be an honor. Thanks Floyd!

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

for beautiful Spelt ciabatta :)  

jarkkolaine's picture
jarkkolaine

Thank you, Mini Oven! 

baybakin's picture
baybakin

Great looking spelt ciabatta!  I'm really surprised that the crumb managed to be that open, very impressive.  on the Yeast water front, you totally should try to make some cider, the process for making a starter for wild fermented cider is very similar, and I've done it quite a few times!  Peach yeast (harvested from the backyard) made the best cider IMHO, but of course, it will vary with location, location, location.

jarkkolaine's picture
jarkkolaine

Thanks, baybakin! 

About the cider, would you happen to know good instructions to point me to? I don't have peaches on my backyard, but I'll try to find something else to use instead ;) 

Cheers,

Jarkko

mwilson's picture
mwilson

Very very Impressive. I've had some experience with white spelt achieving great volume. But the leavening with wild yeast water and the open crumb takes things to new heights. I'm a little jealous.

I really must get into yeast water. Using it, that is! Not bathing in it!

Great work!

Michael

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

YW will do for the crumb of your fantastic panettone  Michael?  Not just the fine textured crumb but how moist and soft it will be - the real surprise of YW that are unrivaled and perfect for panetotone.  I have your great desert breads on the baking list for the holidays using YW and YW & SD combinations.

mwilson's picture
mwilson

Nice idea. Not much water to substitute in Panettone though.

Makes me wonder what is it about YW that brings the soft and moist qualities...? Yet another thing to master...!

Really chuffed that you're going to follow my work. Thanks dabrownman.

Michael

PS. Sorry for hijacking this thread

 

jarkkolaine's picture
jarkkolaine

Thanks for the compliment, Michael!

So far, I have been very happy with yeast water. You should definitely give it a try.

Cheers,

Jarkko

FlourChild's picture
FlourChild

and lovely ciabatta- the open crumb and craggy shapes are so very appealing.  Your boys seem to agree, bravo!

jarkkolaine's picture
jarkkolaine

Thanks, FlourChild! 

Riccardo85's picture
Riccardo85

I am sorry if the questions I ask might seem (are) very stupid but I'm so curious about it!!

Especially looking at your results, this Ciabatta looks better than the ones in Italy!!!

 

Might I ask what's the difference between:

1. YW starter

2. Sourdough starter

3. Poolish starter

jarkkolaine's picture
jarkkolaine

Sorry for my delayed response, Riccardo! Your question is very good, and while I don't have the complete answer, I will try to shed some light...

A poolish starter is created using a little commercial yeast whereas YW and sourdough starters are created without any added yeast. The yeast that grows in them is "wild", as in captured from the ingredients as well as the environment (air, baker's hands, etc.). Because of this, YW and sourdough are slower than a poolish in fermenting the dough. 

But there is more to it... and this is where my understanding of the process gets more limited. In my experiments, I have noticed that although YW and SD are both classified as wild yeast starters, a starter made with YW reminds me a lot of poolish. It doesn't have any of the acidic tones of sourdough. In sourdough starters, lactic acid bacteria outnumber the yeasts at about 1 to 100, but as far as I understand, the proportions in YW are quite different. I don't know the exact numbers but based on taste alone, I would assume that YW is much more yeasty, and therefore leads to a dough closer to one made with regular yeast. 

I hope this made some sense, and big thanks for your compliment :) 

Cheers,

Jarkko