The Fresh Loaf

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Herbed Bialy's – Multigrain, Caramelized Onion, Chorizo and 4 Cheeses

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dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Herbed Bialy's – Multigrain, Caramelized Onion, Chorizo and 4 Cheeses

After pinching off 100g of this combo; Yeast Water and Joe Ortiz’s Cumin, WW Sourdough starter for the donuts and English muffins this past Sunday, we used the remaining 230g of combo starter to make some semolina, durum atta and white whole wheat based herbed bialy’s that had a filling of home made chorizo, caramelized onions, 4 cheeses; brie, aged cheddar, pepper jack and pecorino cheese. The herbs were basil and cilantro.

What a beauty with the cilantro sprinkled on top.

The previous YW bialy’s we made here:

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/27712/yeast-water-rye-ww-garlic-chive-onion-cheese-and-chorizo-bialy%E2%80%99s

where we used YW only for the levain, used much lower % of whole grains and only used a small amount of pepper jack cheese with the only herb being a garlic chive in the dough. The best thing about the old bake was the unbelievable open crumb. Everything else about the new bake turned out better than the old one.

Chorizo and onion mix before caramelizing.

This bake built on the previous one without autolyse, but we gussied it up and baked it with Sylvia’s steam this time while making it a totally hand made dough. Because of the steam and50 Flower temperature, the bake took longer than the previous one that was 10 minute long. This one took 5 min of steam and then 10 more minutes to finish.

These bialys were just delicious with a slight SD tang that we hope will develop over the next 24 hours. We continue to be impressed with the JoeOrtizSDstarter and when mixed with the YW created a nice, light, open crumb and a crust that was thin and chewy. The filling was built up from the bottom starting with fresh basil a cube of double creme and a cube of Alpine Lace Swiss, then a tablespoon or so of the chorizo and caramelized onion mix, with 4 cubes of cheese on top (2 cubes of pepper jack, 1 cube of pecorino and a cube of aged, super sharp cheddar.

Before proofing.

The Method

was straight forward. The combo YW SD was built up over (2) 3 hour builds and (1) 2 hour build and then it was refrigerated for 72 hours. But there was no need to refrigerate it other than to fit my scedule

The chorizo and onions were sautéed until caramelized and refrigerated until needed.

Spooned and docked after proofing.

After warming up, the levain was mixed with the dough water to break it up and the salt, flour, dried potato flakes, barley malt, molasses and butter were added to the mix. After combining by hand, the dough was emptied out to a slightly floured surface and kneaded by hand for 5 minutes. It was fully developed and the dough rebounded immediately when two fingers were poked into the dough. The dough was rested for 20 minutes and then 2 sets of 4 S & F’s each were done on 15 minute intervals. The dough was then allowed to ferment for 1 ½ hours until it had nearly doubled.

Sylvia's Steam in the microwave heating up.

The dough was divided into (10) roughly 100g pieces and hand formed into tight balls. These balls were rested for 10 minutes and then formed into little pizza shapes by picking them up and hanging them in the vertical while pressing out the centers.

Mis en place for filling the unspooned and undocked bialys

These were placed on semolina sprinkled parchment paper on un-rimmed baking sheets. The centers were then pressed out again before covering with plastic wrap to proof for another hour. At the 30 minute proofing mark the oven was preheated to 500 F regular bake and Sylvia’s Steam was prepared in the microwave and placed in the bottom of the oven.

Basil and brie first then Alpine Lace went in too on this level but not shown for som reason..

After proofing, the centers of the bialys were then pressed out flat again with a wet spoon and the centers docked with a fork to keep them from puffing in the oven. Some basil leaves were placed in the bottom with a cube of brie and a cube of Alpine Lace Swiss, a tablespoon of chorizo was added and flattened out to fill the well and 2 cubes of pepper jack and 1 cube of each of aged cheddar and pecorino were placed on top.

Chorizo, and 3 more cheeses, pecorino in the middle, flanked by cheddar and pepperjack.

The bialys were placed onto the middle oven rack with the stone one very top rack and steam below. At 2 minutes the temperature was turned down to 450 F regular bake. At 5 minutes the steam was removed and the temperature turned down to 425 F convection this time as the bialys were rotated 180 degrees on the oven rack. At the 10 minute mark the bialys were rotated 180 degree again and at 15 minutes they were done and moved to cooling racks. The fresh chopped cilantro was then sprinkled on top

Before the cilantro went on.

The formula follows the pix’s.

Cut vertical with my daughter apprentice holding before scarfing.  She liked them!

Cut horizontal.  Not as open as the first YW only ones but these tasted so much better.  Will make them again.

SD & YW Semolina, Durrum Atta, WWW Bialy's w/ Caramelized Onion, Chorizo and 4 cheeses     
      
Mixed StarterBuild 1Build 2Build 3Total%
SD Starter2000203.48%
Yeast Water3500357.61%
S. White Wheat21170388.26%
Durum Atta16017337.17%
WWW01717347.39%
Water035357015.22%
Total Starter92696923050.00%
      
Starter     
Hydration100.00%    
Levain % of Total22.14%    
      
Dough Flour %   
Durum Atta10021.74%   
Bread Flour20043.48%   
White WW5010.87%   
Potato Flakes102.17%   
Semolina10021.74%   
Dough Flour460100.00%   
Salt91.96%   
Water26056.52%   
Dough Hydration56.52%    
      
Total Flour575    
Water - 340, YW -35375    
T. Dough Hydration65.22%    
Whole Grain %46.09%    
      
Hydration w/ Adds70.09%    
Total Weight1,039    
      
Add - Ins %   
Barley Malt204.35%   
Molasses204.35%   
Butter408.70%   
Total Add Ins8017.39%   

 

Apprentice takes a nice 105 F bake herself in the backyard oven.  Dumb Doxie !!!

 

 

 

 

Comments

isand66's picture
isand66

Just beautiful looking bialy's.  What a fantastic combo of fillings and your dough looks perfect.

Great job.

I guess your apprentices fur is protecting her from the heat....

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Will add garlic chives (and maybe some garlic) to the dough, add a little rye flour for taste and some bacon somewhere to build the next evolving DaMcBialy :-)

Lucy can't help herself.  She was bred to be very dumb and totally fearless since both are required, along with long nose, long slender body and legs that fold up compact (if funny) so that these dumb but fierce dogs could  drag badgers out of holes in the ground and the badgers couldn't get to their eyes with their claws - which were no help in a dark hole.  Even though her fur makes her way hotter than snot in the blazing sun, she isn't afraid to die and is too dumb to know she nearly dead by tempting fate with heat exhaustion.

Never knew Germany had a badger problem that required a specially bred dog to cure it either.  Will have to ask hanseata about that.  Speaking of hanseata, these bialys could use some seeds, she would be most disappointed - and maybe some sprouts - to make them more healthy than they already are:-)

Thanks for the comments Ian - you will have great fun messing with these little treats.

varda's picture
varda

and so inventive as usual.  -Varda

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

We really liked the changes we made to this recipe.  The SD added to the YW, the combination of semolina, durum atta and white whole wheat flours, more and varied cheese and the extra herbs made these bialys taste great.   Forgot the garlic chives  in the dough and the garlic note would have been nice.  Also forgot to put in a hint of rye like we almost aways do to enhance the taste.  Will fix these two things next time and possibly add some bacon!.  It is hard to know when to stop - so why stop?

Thanks for the comments Varda.  Didn't get back to St Louis on this last trip but will soon.

isand66's picture
isand66

Also, your bialys could be called Mock Egg DA McMuffins!  The cheese looks like eggs!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

likes the most is to DaMcMuffin a DaBreakfast Bialy.  By splitting them, toasting both halves, adding butter and some caramelized DaMinneMarmalade with some more cheese and a perfectly cooked over easy egg.   You have a total and complete meal in a DaBialy.  See for yourself and thanks for the reminder when we got up hungry this morning and saw your post.   Got to get some bacon in there some place!

 

isand66's picture
isand66

I need to go to bed now....can you beam me over one of these for the morning?  :)

FlourChild's picture
FlourChild

I love bialys, don't know what it is, but they always make me smile.  Yours are great, loading them up is your signature style! 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

You know me too well flourchild!  I too love bialys and will load them up with anything that makes me smile more.  These were a little extra loaded and have some of my favorites in and on them.  They are just terrific.

Thanks for you fine comments and I still like your handle.  Reminds me of days long ago in SF.

mamatkamal's picture
mamatkamal

Those Bialys look amazing and caramelized onions and cheese are a fabulous combination. Thanks a lot for sharing with us such a wonderful Bialys step by step and the photos are superb.
Cheers
Mamat

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Mamatkamal.   Glad you liked them and the presentation.  I like the step by step approach so if someone else wants to make them, especially the folks new to baking bread,  they have a good example and path to follow on their bialy quest.  These are delicious and we now know what we will do next to make them even better - or more strange depending on the point of view:-)

Thanks for your nice comments and happy baking.

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Lovely Bialies, DA! Never attempted baking one. I can't bake bread as regularily as i used to.

:) very healthy too!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

like I used to.  The freezer is full of half loaves that were frozen right after they cooled from the oven.  Must be 10 of them in there after eating 5.  Have been making breakfast bread like bagels, bialys and English muffins just so we don't throw away the starter when feeding it without at least baking something and use 20 g of it.

These bialys are like pizzas.  Real healthy before you load them up with toppings :-)  We sure like the semolina and durum atta flours.  Love the yellow color and the taste they impart.  Mixing them with white WW keeps the color intact.  Hope you can get back to baking more very soon and your recovery continues.

Thanks for your nice comments. 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

What does the 'atta' in durum atta mean and how does this flour differ from regular durum?  Thanking you in advance.

joyfulbaker's picture
joyfulbaker

And here comes the "but"!  How can they rightfully be called bialys?  Guess I'm a purist and not nearly as inventive as I'd like, but these really are a totally new invention-yours!  Congratulations for a fabulous creation!  But (once again), the Bialystockers wouldn't recognize these rolls, now, would they?

Joyful

PS:  Small point and a question:  What's the difference between durum atta and patent durum?  I read somewhere that "atta' means flour (Indian origin, I think, but I may be remembering wrongly).  I like patent durum flour, but I once bought the other and didn't like it as well.  Would appreciate clarification.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Words do have meaning and I for one am glad that they do.  If Bialys are made with certain kinds of flours, without add ins, bulgar scalds and can only have onion and poppy seed fillings - then these are not bialys and I agree with you.  These have strayed far off the bialy resevation and should be called something else.

Since you were the first to correctly notice that these don't fit the bialy definition, you get to give them the name for which they will forever be known!  Put that thinking cap on, take your time and Name That Little Pizza:-)

I am just glad I finally figured out how to get that famous bialy shape with the well in the middle to look right :-)  Last time it sort of closed in like a bagel where the hole disappeared.  This time the shape was OK.

From what I understand,  durum atta means durum wheat with the sifted out bran added back in.  That is what it looks like too.  Perhaps another TFL'er could fill us in.

Glad you liked the MiniDaPizzas - and you can't use that name :-)

Mebake's picture
Mebake

DA, Atta is the Indian term for whole wheat flour, as opposed to maida, which is plain white flour. I know so much as i live in Dubai, and there are lots of Indian expats, and Indian food products.

Atta's texture is ideally smooth, creamy, with large bran particles sifted out. It is 92-97% extraction (75% is white flour). Indian wheat (i think) is amber in color, and resembles the durum wheat, but shorter. It isn't hard like Durum, so technically it performs like a regular wheat.

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

The one I have is grown in Canada.  The ingredient lists Durum Wheat and Wheat Bran.  I wonder if this is regular Durum since it comes from Canada.

joyfulbaker's picture
joyfulbaker

Actually I have two names.  One is "bialetta" and the other ('cause there's a lotta good stuff on that little roll) is "bialotta."  Take your pick;  hope these names "speak" to you!

And thanks, Mebake, for the info on "atta"!  Again, it's a matter of semantics, isn't it?

Joyful  (former grad school linguistics/semiotics student)

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I like both of them equally well so we will break the tie by having the apprentice do the final pick.  Will let you know when she decides.

Thanks for the great names!  This is very exciting.  Who knew I would pick an expert to name these fake bialys?  Glad you didn't come up with fakobialorenos :-)

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

after being told to find the name, one written on a small pice of paper in each of my hands, picked DaBialotta thinking it smelled better or something like that.

So that is the name these little alotta fake bialy's will forever be known!

Thankls joyful for you fine name picking.

 

joyfulbaker's picture
joyfulbaker

Can't you hear me chuckling (OK laughing WAY out loud!) at your funny name.  You are one creative dude!  Hope your "apprentice" doesn't find my suggestions too boring (after fakobialorenos, they sure are awfully tame!).  As we speak, I am hatching another batch--the ol' fashioned kind of course.  My last batch ended up a little too boring (not enough salt in dough?) with bright pink onion centers (I had cooked the onions before adding them and, no, I'm not taking their picture).  This time, I'm following Mimi Sheraton's, Jeffrey Hamelman's and Marc Strasman's advice--that is, raw onions tempered with some breadcrumbs mixed a few hours before the bake.  I also swished water into the food processor to capture the onion residue and used that water in the dough (with bits of onion--how daring of me!)--a tweak on Maggie Glezer's method (she does the dough in the processor without washing out the work bowl, but I didn't want to do that).  I hope they taste great and don't have pink centers!

Joyful

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

has a pink fetish among other things.  We cook red onions, a classic no no, in our Dijon mustard recipe just to get that pink color in the mustard oil eventually! We love pink sprinkles on our banana bread cupcake icing.  We make pickled red onions just to have that gorgeous pinkish red pickling vinegar  to use in homemade salad dressings.  Here is pix of our pink stash.

I'm sure that we would only want pink centers in our classic bialy's.  Who else has them?  Now if the pink centers weren't coming from red onions - I don't know what I would do but it would have some cleansing 1000 F fire in it somewhere :-)

We make cheesecake, soaked red chili chopping and hummus in the food process otherwise we don't like to wash it!

joyfulbaker's picture
joyfulbaker

Well, if you insist on touting "pink is beautiful," here are my "bialys in pink."  Enjoy!  (Really, they taste like regular ol' bialys!)

                

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

You will have to sell them for a premium price or get more in some kind of trade for them.  Instead of a 'bake off' the TFL'ers should have a pink off to show that pink is the new 'in' baking color.   Those are the nicest bialys I've ever seen.  We have to come up with an appropriate name for them.

joyfulbaker's picture
joyfulbaker

As I may have mentioned earlier somewhere on this site, the reason for the pink, as I read it (again "somewhere") is that the onions are "on the way" to being caramelized when they are cooked for about 5-10 minutes but have not yet darkened to that point.  I don't fancy "in the pink" bialys as much as the other name.  Anyway, I don't really think I'm going to try for a repeat, as the ones I made with the onions uncooked (mixed with bread crumbs and set aside for a couple hours to "stew") were much more palatable in my eyes (and on my tongue).  But maybe you want to give it a go, dabrownman!

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

toying with for your fabulous pink creation.  Are you telling me you didn't use red onions and still got pink anyway?

joyfulbaker's picture
joyfulbaker

I used sweet yellow onions, not red.  It's not the first time that has happened.  When I oven-roasted chopped yellow onions preparing to bake onion pockets (at 350 for about an hour), they turned pink (only not quite as bright a pink as this last batch).  Sorry, no photo of those.  So give it a try and you too can create "Oh No Pinkos"!  Great name; it's got "punch"!  (-:

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

You have to trade mark the Oh No Pinko name, the recipe and and the method to make them!  Best new bialy of the week!