The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Hydration

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Aeola's picture
Aeola

Hydration

New to the forum and new to baking so please excuse a basic question.

When I read on this site that a loaf has a hydration of e.g. 60% is this the percentage of water to flour by volume such as 1kg of flour to 600ml of water.

Thanks,

flournwater's picture
flournwater

The 60% hydration refers to the weight of the liquid used as a ratio to the weight of flour used in the formula.

"... please excuse a basic question ..."  We understand that basic questions are sometimes difficult to ask.  Often (but improperly) considered embarrassing.  Forget about that.  If you've got a question; ask.  We're all here to learn and share.  Welcome to thefreshloaf.

Wild-Yeast's picture
Wild-Yeast

When I read on this site that a loaf has a hydration of e.g. 60% is this the percentage of water to flour by volume such as 1kg of flour to 600ml of water.


Think about the above sentence, -"is this the percentage of water flour by volume such as 1kg of flour to 600ml of water.[?]." Kilogram is a measure of weight, millilitre is a measure of volume - though it can be defined as weight if it consists of water [by definition a gram is 1/1000 of a litre of pure water and a liter of pure water being equal to a kilogram].  

Bakers universally use weight to measure ingredients - making a digital kitchen scale necessary for consistent, repeatable outcomes.  

Wild-Yeast

seasidepeter's picture
seasidepeter

Hello bakers...quite new to all this, having become addicted via Peter Reinhart's book The Bread Baker's Apprentice. I've made several poolis-es (ii? :-) ) and pate fermetees, and something in the book is unclear. I made the pate and refrigerate it overnight (at least) before using. However - despite my fridge being at the correct temperature (0 to 4 degrees), the pate continues to rise. My question: should it? And if so, should I degass it completely before cutting into small pieces and adding it to the main dough as per Reinhart's recipe? Or do I just handle it gently and try not to deflate it too much?

It may seem a silly question - but it seems to me that tiny things can make huge differences in this baking malarkey.

Thanks for any help...Peter