The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

pH Meter

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asicign's picture
asicign

pH Meter

Following up on dmsnyder's suggestion, I'm creating an entry on pH meters.  I few years back, I did some research in order to purchase an inexpensive meter to track the pH of my fish pond, which was under reconstruction.  Around the same time, I was trying to get a sourdough going, and I felt this would help.  I ended up with a Hanna Instruments meter, which is available on Amazon for $31.15: 

http://www.amazon.com/Hanna-Instruments-Tester-Replaceable-Electrode/dp/B003IKNJPW/ref=sr_1_1?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1331391147&sr=1-1

 

This meter allows one to calibrate at two separate pH's, and ideally you would do this with one above, and one below the value you are trying to measure.  For example, when I was playing with sourdough starters, I calibrated with pH buffers of 7.01 and 4.01.  Obviously you need to purchase (or make) the buffers.  pH buffers are available online, although I purchased mine from a local university chemistry stores.  

I've been very pleased with my meter, although other customers on Amazon have not been as fortunate.  In any case, I feel that it is one of those tools that should be in every home.  (I forgot to mention that it is a very useful tool to keep your pH sensitive plants happy).

Andy S.

 

MikeSartin's picture
MikeSartin

I have used similar instruments in high school chemistry classes for years with good success.  Use two or three buffers as directed to calibrate and slope the instrument.  Interestingly, there is probably a way to use red cabbage or beet juice, white vinegar, a pack of semi-log graph paper, an eye dropper and the long-forgotten part of freshman chemistry to get the same results.  :)