The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Flax seed Sourdough, what a hit

  • Pin It
Connie.'s picture
Connie.

Flax seed Sourdough, what a hit

   Here's my first loaf to place on The Fresh Loaf, hope you enjoy it!                        
Today I’m baking with Flax seeds. I like the nutty taste of these tiny brown seeds and if only part is true about the benefits, Flax seeds are also amazingly healthy.I changed 6 things with this recipe:

  1. I used 100 grams more water because I soaked the flax seeds in boiling water and when cooled enough added the water too.
  2. I used rye flour and added whole wheat bran, instead of only rye flour.
  3. An autolyse of more than 3 hours in stead of the required 1 hour.
  4. After bulk fermentation I gently formed a kind of batard with the help of flour and dough cutter without pre-shape placed it directly in the floured banneton.
  5. I placed a wet towel (instead of a plastic bag) on top of the banneton and let the dough proof.
  6. I baked the loaf at approx. 230°C. My oven only heats from the bottom and to get a brown color on the bread it needs more heat. And it’s very difficult to adjust the temperature without a proper thermometer.
I will bake it this way again because the result is GREAT. The crumb is very soft and it smells nutty and is slightly sour, with a crusty crust.You find the recipe here 

Comments

Dragonbones's picture
Dragonbones

Nice job, Connie!  I baked something similar last night, sourdough flaxseed with some bran and whole rye flour. I also add a rounded Tbsp of buckwheat flour (if you try this, go easy on the buckwheat). It's one of my most common loaves, baked at least twice a month.  

Connie.'s picture
Connie.

Thanks Dragonbones, I understand why you bake this one twice a month. I've baked it twice last week.

Yerffej's picture
Yerffej

Nice bread Connie.

I am curious as to why you soak the flax seeds in boiling water rather than room temperature water.

Jeff

Connie.'s picture
Connie.

Thanks Jeff, to be honest I just followed instructions on soaking multigrain which included flax seed and I love how they are chewable now. Don't know if the boiling water 'kills' all the benefits of flax seed. Do you use room temperature water in stead?

Yerffej's picture
Yerffej

I do use room temperature water for flax seed and it works quite well.

Jeff

fancy4baking's picture
fancy4baking

Nice work Connie. I was thinking about baking a loaf with sesame and balck sesame seeds, now you gave me the idea of adding flaxseed to them. Also autolysis for 3 horus is something i hear about for the first time. Maybe i will try your method. But you don't mention anything about how long you let the dough rise for bulk fermentation also for final proofing!!

Izzat

Connie.'s picture
Connie.

Thanks Izzat, sounds like a great combination: black and white sesame with some flax seed.
The 3 hours of autolyse was because we had unexpected guests, see my blog for the complete method http://mydiscoveryofbread.blogspot.com/2012/05/flax-seed-sourdough-what-hit.html

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Looks great, Connie.  Welcome!

-Floyd

Connie.'s picture
Connie.

Thanks Floyd, it's great to place a post on bread on
The Fresh Loaf. I follow the Fresh Loaf for more than a year now, and this is definitely not the last loaf I'll post.
There is so much to learn and share and eat of course.

Dragonbones's picture
Dragonbones

BTW, I don't bother to soak the flaxseeds, or in general, multigrains. I like the texture this way, personally. Another nice touch to try is unsoaked millet. Nice crunch!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

your first TFL post.  Looks like the extra water really helped to get an open moist crumb.  The color and crunchy crust  are very nice too.  But, if it tastes great, then it should be a hit!

Nice bake.