The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Hello from UK

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tourerjim's picture
tourerjim

Hello from UK

Hi all, newbie just sign into the forum so yet to find me way around, we've had the Kenwood BM450 for awhile now & made some lovely loafs that seems to have turn us into BreadAddicts but last nights one went a bit wrong so now I'm going to find the correct place on here to tell you all about it so I'll pop back soon...!!!  

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

try typing into the site search machine:  breadmachine (and the problem; heavy bread or no rise or lumps...)

and see what discussions pop up   

And you are correct... bread is addictive.  

tourerjim's picture
tourerjim

Thank's 

lumos's picture
lumos

Welcome to TFL.  There're many on this forum who're also from UK, including myself.  Hope you enjoy the lovely company here. :)

tourerjim's picture
tourerjim

Thank's

richkaimd's picture
richkaimd

We regular readers often post tips for getting the most out of your experience at TFL.  Mine are these:

1.)  Practice, practice, and practice some more.  And then post your results, successes and failures.  Teach us and we teach you.

2.)  Read TFL often.  Watch all the videos as soon as you can get around to it.  You'll get an idea of what we're talking about.  When problems arise you'll have a tickle in your head that you saw a video.  Go back to it.

3.)  When you have a question, use the search function to look up the answer BEFORE you post it.  Lots of questions have been asked and answered countless times.  Especially if you need your answer right away, you can often get your answer using the search function.  Here are some things to learn as soon as possible:  what is a baker's formula?  what is gluten?  what is the difference between high and low hydration doughs?  what is a gluten window and why can it help you to learn when you've kneaded your dough enough?  how do you know when to stop your bread from rising?  

4.)  Learn the difference between a cook book and a text book.  Texts are obliged to teach you from the ground up; cook books aren't.  I have lots of both.  But even years into bread baking, I found that reading a text book quite helpful because of it's organized exposition of the knowledge.  I recommend a specific text book for beginners.  It's DiMuzio's Bread Baking.  It's cheap, short, and complete.  There are lots of other texts, but DiMuzio's is the one I think beginners can do best with.  

5.)  Oh, yes, and practice, practice, and practice some more.  Or did I already say that?