The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Amazing video on shaping French regional breads

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Elagins's picture
Elagins

Amazing video on shaping French regional breads

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

last shape where he rolled the ends flat and then rolled them up to the middle and then tucked them underneath.  Who knew?

Vicki F's picture
Vicki F

After watching your video link I was so intrigued by it I watched the rest of the videos - thank you very much for providing the link for watching a master bread baker ply his trade.

The fact that I speak no French made no difference whatsoever; he was so experienced it all looked effortless.I found his high use of flour consistent with my own training, though different apparently from what is being taught these days. I especially enjoyed his lack of perfectionism; he obviously turns out high quality product without the need for fussiness.

The loading and unloading of that huge oven was fascinating as well. Again, thank you for the link!

PastryPaul's picture
PastryPaul

That was a blast. I do speak French so I got some of his little asides and historical references.

I was particularly intrigued by the "artichoke" bread (shaped like one not made with one, but then again why not?)

I've got a few artichoke shapes and some "pain plié" (folded bread) proofing. They were all sold while I was shaping them, even though it took me four tries to get the knack of getting the artichoke shape. For those who don't speak French, he mentions that, historically that shape was done at the end of the shift with all the left-over trimmings. The dough was therefore stiffer. I eventually just kneaded in about 10%BP extra flour to stiffen an existing baguette dough. Fourth time was the charm.

That shape will become a regular with us.

Cheers

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

Really enjoyed the video, Stan. Thank you.

(I like the artichoke). 

I hope you don't mind me linking to another site that also including shaping videos.

It's been posted here before, but newcomers may not have seen it.

Here's the link: http://techno.boulangerie.free.fr/09-ReussirLeCAP/03-lesFormesEnVideo.html

Click on each to bring up the video.

Elagins's picture
Elagins

I loved it so much I put a link on the nybakers.com website.  Thanks for the heads-up

Stan

Stuart Borken's picture
Stuart Borken

I also speak no French but you don't have to.  Bread shaping techniques are a universal language.  It was actually thrilling to see a master at work.  Here in Minneapolis, Minnesota, we have a couple fantastic French bakeries.  One of them, Rustica, has its kitchen against a outdoor glass wall.  You can watch the bakers shape and rise breads and place them on the long huge slides that send them into the steam ovens.  You can watch them slash the baguettes, each one of the thousands that they make by hand each morning.  When the head baker removes them from the oven, he looks each one over and they all look great to me...but....he every once and a while pulls one off the slide breaks it in half and discards it because it does not meet his criteria for perfection.  There is a range of appearance he looks for and the breads he sells must meet his standard.  I am in awe of what these bakers create.  I have not yet made my perfect loaf.  I'll keep trying, with the help of TheFreshLoaf.

jeffy1021's picture
jeffy1021

any idea what kind of work surface he is using?

Stuart Borken's picture
Stuart Borken

I assume it's floured wood, it has a natural textured surface which offers an adherence onto the dough.

jeffy1021's picture
jeffy1021

that's what i assumed too, it just looks so white on the video, guess it must be heavily floured