The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Using a convection steam oven

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hornedfox's picture
hornedfox

Using a convection steam oven

Just bought a Electrolux steam/convection oven. I cant find a manual for it so looking for some help to use it for baking bread the steam function is in degrees c. Is 30 degrees C the same as 30% steam. Anyone Know how to get the best out of this machine

 

thanks

 

Ian

barriehiebread's picture
barriehiebread

C stands for celsius and is a temp. scale, like fahrenheit. To convert back and forth use this: F - 32 = 9/5 x C Sorry no help with the oven! Barrie

yy's picture
yy

Two options:

1. look up the model number and do a google search to see if there is a .pdf manual online for you to download. 

2. If the first option turns up nothing, call the company and ask them to send you a manual. Have the model number ready. 

hornedfox's picture
hornedfox

Thanks for the replies. I got the temp thing. In the UK we use celcius, Fahrenheit is a mystery to me. Some help site use % for steam most say 30 % steam; this oven uses temp up to 100 degrees celsius. I have searched for .pdf files and have contacted electrolux who were decidedly unhelpful but none had a manual. So my only hope is someone who has or had this model and still has a manual. Still I fired it up for the first time today and baked 6 kg of dough into different sized loafs use 30 C steam and it was pretty good. Went down well here anyway But I think I can do better with a little help

So anyone used one of these machines, please help a wannabe baker

 

Ian

llwhitley's picture
llwhitley

Something doesn't seem right. 100° C (= 212° F) is the boiling point of water. That is normally close to the bottom end of settings for an oven, whether convection or not. Look to see if you can find any more things to adjust. I can see the steam level adjusting from 0% to 100% or from 30% to 100%. I cannot imagine an oven, including convection ovens going from 30° C to 100° C.  The 30° C (86° F) or even a few degrees more would work for proofing, but 100° C (212° F) is low for baking. Considering that bread is not baked until it reaches 87.8° C (190° F) or a little higher, it seems like it would take a good while to bake bread in such an oven.

Did you buy this oven new or used? Is there any possibility that it is a commercial proofing oven and not a "baking" oven?

Have you tried calling Electrolux for information on the oven? Do you know the model number of the oven?

Linda

hornedfox's picture
hornedfox

The oven happily ticked over at 30 degrees C to proof the bread. I then took it out and turned it up to 230 dgrees C where it baked nicely I wasnt happy with the crust so I will try setting the water to 100 degrees C instead of 30 and see what happens. I have tried electrolux and they havent got a manual strange! but as I said before they were less than helpful. whose heared of a manufacturing that dosent have manuals for old products stashed away somewhere.

Doc.Dough's picture
Doc.Dough

It is possible that the steam setting represent the temperature at which the water vapor in the oven reaches saturation and would condense on any object in the oven below that temperature.  There is an instrument called a dewpoint hygrometer that  (in at least some implementations) uses a temperature controlled mirror to detect condensation.  The temperature of the mirror when it starts/stops fogging up approximates the dewpoint.  It would make sense to use this type of sensor to control oven humidity but I can't tell you that Electrolux actually does it that way.  I expect that there are only a few points of interest on the scale: perhaps 10%, 20%, 50% and 100% humidity at an oven temp of 100°C.  With an atmospheric pressure oven you can't get a dewpoint above 100°C even if the oven dry bulb temperature is 250°C.  I suspect that for proofing you might want to set the humidity to the oven temp or slightly below, so for 30°C proofing temp, set the dial at 30°C (or 28°C) and your loaves won't dry out.  But for baking bread with steam to get early crust formation, you probably want to use 100°C.

 

hornedfox's picture
hornedfox

would you use 100 c steam for 15 mins then finish of with convection only?

thanks

Ian

Bread Mat's picture
Bread Mat

Hi there, not sure if you are still looking for help but I came across your thread and thought I could help. We have recently bought a Miele steam/convection oven and yes the steam is controlled up to 100% humidity (I suppose 100c), which is seperate to the convection heat which can be varied from 100-300c.

Assume you have that at least sorted - but if you would like some tips on the varied use of steam through the baking process - try downloading the Miele userguide for their 5080XL oven.   It has alot of tips and suggestions for various combinations of steam/heat for various bread and yeast cooking (along with alot of other stuff you can use it for!).

I find using steam at a high % for the first 15 minutes help with the rise, then a period of convection only, followed by a the final 15-20 mins with med steam/heat combination which develops the crust.   Hopefully your oven allows you to set various stages else you may need to do manually with help of a timer - but the results are definitley noticeable!

 

Good luck and enjoy

Matt