The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Flaxseed Rye

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wassisname's picture
wassisname

Flaxseed Rye

This is my version of the flaxseed rye posted by hansjoakim a couple of weeks ago.  I couldn’t resist this one.  Not only would it satisfy my ongoing and inexplicable craving for flaxseeds, but it also provided an opportunity to use-up some of the old bread I’ve had frozen and waiting for just such an occasion. 

I put together the soaker and rye sour the night before baking and the next morning both were looking good.  Then I made the mistake of starting the dough before I had my coffee.  Not usually a big deal, but this wasn’t one of my usual breads so I should have been a little less fuzzy in the head when I started.  I must have measured poorly to begin with because I could tell right from the start of mixing that the dough was too dry.  My muddled brain went from a groggy sort of panic to really bad decision making before I could stop it, and before I realized what I was doing I had added way too much water.  Ugh.  So I added flour and added flour, and the dough soaked it right up and just kept sticking to everything.  I probably could have added even more but I had been kneading for so long I felt like the dough had been abused enough. 

The sticky mess bulk fermented a bit longer than in the original method, about 2 hrs, but the dough looked pretty much the same as it did at the start.  I moved on anyway, this being a rye dough.  Shaping the dough was a whole other adventure involving plenty more flour.  I gave the loaves a fairly tight pre-shaping to try and build some strength and a very short bench rest.  With the help of yet another heap of flour I wrestled them into shape and dropped them into their baskets.  At this point I was expecting the worst and certainly expected them to stick to the baskets like they had stuck to everything else.  But they proofed up nicely and came out of the baskets cleanly.  They held their shape into the oven and my hopes began to rise.

They came out of the oven looking good (my attempts at creative scoring rarely turn out this well) and smelling even better, but I’ve fallen for that one before.  Waiting for them to cool was torture.  I took the dog for a walk; I puttered around the yard, and finally couldn’t wait any longer.  I put the knife to the bread and, hey, the crust felt nice and thin.  I started cutting and, hey, the crumb felt nice and light.  I can’t believe this turned out as well as it did.  The flavor is amazing!  This is a really great formula - highly recommended.  Thank you Hans!

Marcus

Comments

Christl's picture
Christl

I see you made good use of your free time. Looks like a great loaf of bread. Speaks well of the baker if a near disaster turns out that good. Christl

 

wassisname's picture
wassisname

Thanks, a good formula and a little luck go a long way :)

Marcus

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Great results, Marcus! you being a skilled homebaker saved the day, afterall. Lovely irregular Crumb (given the abused dough), and excellent loking crust. I'am inspired now!

Hans formulas are very solid. He often adaptes from Hamelman's recipes, and that only goes to show how tasteful he is.

 

wassisname's picture
wassisname

Thanks Khalid, I must say that one of the great things about trying breads that I find here is that I can keep the photo from the original post in my mind's eye while I bake. That has saved me more than once and it's a benefit not always available when baking from books. There is a variation on this formula in Hamelman's Bread that I have meant to bake for some time, but this one is a bit lighter and includes the old bread soaker so I couldn't resist.

Marcus

isand66's picture
isand66

Looks like your bake turned out excellent. Beautiful crust and crumb.  I shall have to try this one to.

Regards

Ian

wassisname's picture
wassisname

Thank you Ian!  This is absolutely one worth trying.  It is the rare bread that I don't begin mentally tinkering with as soon as it's done.  This is one of them.  I'd be more careful next time, but otherwise no changes. 

Marcus

lumos's picture
lumos

Oh, Marcus, what a beautiful crumb you got.  I love the way you scored them, too. 

The original blog by Hans was really enticing, but looking at your result made me convinced I've got to try it myself, soon, too. 

Thank you for sharing.

wassisname's picture
wassisname

Thank you so much, lumos!  Maybe next time I'll get up enough nerve to be creative with the scoring on both loaves... that's a big step!

If you like flaxseeds this really is a loaf for you.  I can't wait to see it!

Marcus

varda's picture
varda

you pulled those beautiful loaves out of your hat, given your write-up.   Wow, you are good!   Those look just gorgeous.  -Varda

wassisname's picture
wassisname

Thank you Varda, you are too kind!  I'll take lucky over good any day :)  This is one of those good, sturdy formulas.  I think as long as the rye sour is in good shape going in something good will probably come out of it.

Marcus

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

to end up with such nice looking bread!  How much rye was in it?  I'm guessing it is very tasty indeed.

wassisname's picture
wassisname

Thanks dabrownman!  It's 40% whole rye and very tasty.  I'll be playing with the old bread idea in loaves to come.  I think that added a nice flavor element.  I used an old chunk of what was probably a whole wheat loaf that was pretty dark and crusty, and I think it added a nutty, "crust" component to the flavor of the crumb.  Good stuff!

Marcus