The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Trimoline

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plevee's picture
plevee

Trimoline

Several times when I have wanted to make cakes from AB&P I have given up because one of the ingredients is Trimoline. Wikipedia says it is an invert sugar and suggests honey as a possible substitute.


Could one of the commercial baking members please advise me as to the equivalent weight of honey or another substitute for cake recipes? Or whether it can simply be left out?


Patsy

yy's picture
yy

disclaimer: I am not a commercial baker. My only qualification is that I have access to the internet.


I've never heard of trimoline before, but according to wikipedia, it's just table sugar split into glucose and fructose to create a sweetener that doesn't crystallize as easily. I'm guessing that high fructose corn syrup will perform the same way. The glucose/fructose percentages in HFCS are nearly the same as in trimoline (which I think is 50/50 by definition). While HFCS is most similar in composition to trimoline, I'm pretty sure regular corn syrup (which is mostly glucose and not so much fructose) will work fine. It sweetens and is not prone to crystallization. Agave syrup is another substitute that comes to mind. Honey would probably work, but honey has its own flavor. If you want to keep the sweetness neutral, I'd go with something else.


Maybe someone who's used trimoline would give a better answer.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

HFCS is not - not ever - even though they are nearly identical twins in every way possible.  Selective outrage possibly at work ......

Franko's picture
Franko

Hi Patsy,


The Trimoline is meant to keep the cake moist, and is something that bakers use in a cake batter to avoid having to 'drench' a large volume of cakes individually by hand. When I do a scratch cake batter at home, I make a 'drenching syrup' or light simple syrup flavoured appropriately for whatever cake I'm making. Make a light simple syrup and then brush it on the cake layers before applying the icing, glaze or topcoat. This will help keep your cake/cakes moist for a week or more. Hope this helps.


Franko

plevee's picture
plevee

For your help, but I am still uncertain.


Is Trimoline a liquid or a solid?


Will omitting it throw off the recipe proportions?


Patsy

Franko's picture
Franko

Trimoline would be a very heavy syrup, similar to glucose or corn syrup. You may have to increase your batter hydration very slightly, but use your best judgement in comparing the thickness/viscosity of the batter to what previous successful sponge cake batters have looked like. I'm sorry I can't be more precise than that, but I'm guessing you're making a sponge type batter if it's calling for a humectant. I don't think omitting it will have any major impact on the overall performance or flavour of the batter if it's mixed according to the directions. Have all your ingredients at room temp, particularly the eggs, but just mix it as you would a typical sponge cake batter.


Franko


 


 

plevee's picture
plevee

Thanks again. I'll try some of the recipes substituting corn syrup.


I once knew a baker who added a small amount of glycerin to her sponge cakes to add moistness. I suppose this acted in the same way as the Trimoline.


Patsy

Masterbaker Azmir's picture
Masterbaker Azmir

You can make your own trimoline by boling - 480 ml of water, 1000 grams of sugar and 1 grams of citric acid or cream of tartar.

Once the mixture boils wash away any sugar crystals stuck to the side of the pan with pastry brush dipped in water. Any additional water added to the pan from this process, has no effect on the final outcome.

On medium heat without stirring boil the mixture to 236°F (114°C). Remove from heat and cover the pan. Let cool at room temperature. Store in a refrigerator. Invert sugar will last at least 6 moths.

 

sarakaun's picture
sarakaun

Thank you!