The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

A Blend of Seigle d’Auvergne and Borodinski

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dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

A Blend of Seigle d’Auvergne and Borodinski

A blend of Seigle d’Auvergne and Borodinski where diastatic malt is used in the dough on the French side and non diastatic malt with scalded rye berries is used on the Russian side.  Thank goodness no retardation is required, no matter how nice it would be, to produce a nearly classic clash of multicultural bread with different colored malts and multi grain flours that ends up being slightly unique in the end - in a peaceful and united way.   The loaf rose well during final proof but the spring was more of a sprawl.  The crust is chewy the crumb is moist, soft and quite airy.   It tastes like your eating really good Russian Rye bread while walking down the Champ de Elysee in the springtime.  Recipe follows the pix's. 

Pink Himilayan Salt, the scald, dough and levain

Red Non D and White D Malts

Rye berries being scalded with the Red ND Malt

White D Malt on white flour

Before final rise

 French / Russian 57% Rye, 11% WW Rustic Bread

Starter - 10 g

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

rye

1.68

 

 

 

 

WW

1.66

 

 

 

 

AP

1.66

 

 

 

 

water

5

 

 

 

 

Starter

10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain- 220g

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

BP

1st build

2nd build

3rd build

Starter

10

1.51%

10

 

 

Rye

40

6.02%

10

20

10

WW

40

6.02%

10

20

10

B. Flour

40

6.02%

10

20

10

Water

90

13.55%

30

60

 

Total

220

33.13%

70

120

30

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scald – 53 g after scald and

soak

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RyeBerry

25

3.77%

 

 

 

Water

23

3.46%

 

 

 

ND Malt

5

0.75%

 

 

 

Scald

53

7.98%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bread –391 g

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DarkRye

67

10.09%

 

 

 

Rye

66

9.94%

 

 

 

B. Flour

73

10.99%

 

 

 

D. Malt

5

0.75%

 

 

 

Salt

5

0.75%

 

 

 

Water

175

26.36%

 

 

 

Bread

391

58.89%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

T. Weight

664

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grains& Flour

366

Including scald and starter

 

Water

293

Including scald and starter

 

Hydration

80.05%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain is

33.13%

of the total weight.

 

 

 Directions

 Take 10 g of 100% hydration starter and add10 Geach; Rye, WW and AP flour along with 30 g of water.  Mix well, cover with plastic and let sit for 6 hours on the counter.  Then add 20 g each of the same flours and 60 g water.  Let sit on counter for 6 hours.  Refrigerate overnight.  In the morning add10 geach of the flours but no water and let sit on the counter covered in plastic wrap.

 Scald the rye berries and red non-diastatic malt in50 gof water.  Boil until the water barely disappears.  Turn off heat and reserve covered with plastic wrap on counter with the levain. Let sit 2 hours then start autolyse.

 Mix the bread flours, white distatic malt and water well, cover and autolyse for 1 hour after the scald and the levain have rested 2 hours on the counter.

 Mix in the levain and let autolyse for 1 hour.  Then add the scald and the salt and mix well.  Do 5 S&F’s on an oiled surface and place in an oiled bowl.  Then do 5 S&F’s every 20 minutes 2 more times.  Pre-form into ball using the final S & F’s at the 1 hour mark and let sit in an oiled bowl for 20 minutes.

 Shape as desired, I did an oval, dust with rye bran or other bran, flour or rice flour and place in prepared basket.  Place basket in plastic bag and let proof until dough has risen 70% - 80%.  You can also proof in a DO.

 Pre heat oven to 500 F for 45 minutes, with your stone and steaming apparatus in place.  No steam needed if using a DO.  Take dough out of benetton by overturning onto a piece of parchment on a peel.  Slide bread and parchment paper into oven onto the baking stone.  Turn oven down to 450 F and bake for 15 minutes.  Remove steaming apparatus and turn down oven to 425 F with convection on now.  Bake about 20 minutes more until bread reaches 205 F in the middle.   Let sit on stone, in off oven, with the door ajar for 10 minutes.  Cool on rack.

 If using DO, bake at 500 F for 20 minutes with lid on, then remove lid and turn down temperature to 450 F.  Bake about 20 minutes more until middle of bread is 205 F. 

Comments

varda's picture
varda

but the bread looks nice and hearty.   And the crumb looks really good.   Delicious?  -Varda

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

your eating really nice Russian Rye bread while walking down the Champ de Elysee in the springtime.  You are right the crumb is very good, soft airy and moist.  Broke out my first attempt at a 100% rye bread from the freezer this morning so a comparison could be made.  The crumb was much better for new but the taste was deeper on the old but the taste was close.  Even though the new was only 67% rye and WW it had a much better scald with the red rye malt knock off  that the first 100% rye didn't have in the scald.  Could a decent shot at a nearly real Borodinski be in the offing?.  The white diastatic malt was a plus too.  The scald really helkps this new variation.  But you are right, I have to come up with a name for it  Was going to use 'Hey Frenchie How's Your Russkie? ' but there are so many serious bakers out there without a sense of humor I thought better of it :-) Pix is toasted of the two. Black raspberry and blueberry jam with Caramelized Minneola Marmalade.  Yum!

 

isand66's picture
isand66

Great looking bread DA....you guys are convincing me that I have to give this a try in the near future.

Nice write up and photos as well.

I'm in the beginning of mixing up a new dough about 4 different varieties of flour, some onion I smoked on the BBQ the other day and I took your advise and used some expresso powder.  Find out tomorrow or Sunday if this concoction turns out for the best.

Also working on D Snyder's Sourdough....have to make the liquid levain later tonight.

I was working on this earlier in the week but I got distracted and forgot to add one of the flours and had to discard it the next day.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I have a thing for rye breads.  I think they taste great and I attribute it to marketing, selling and distributing Rubchlager breaS for all those years.  I loved all of their breads  Their bakery is in Chicago. and you can Google  them.

Thanks for the comments.  It was fun to make.  This is some fine tasting bread too.  I wolfed half of it in the  blink of an eye.  Have never used white and red malt before either - at least not in bread.  One is supposed to help flavor and color and the other to supply the enzyme to convert grains to sugar (Maltose) that thje yeast can feed on to make CO2 and alcohol while extending the shelf life.

I made an earlier version of David's SFSD and it was great.  I just ate the other half of the boule last week - delicious.  David's recipes are always top notch - Pulgliesi Capriosso and San Joaquin were great.  I am waiting for David to say his quest for the SFSD is over before baking it again.

Your multi-grain, smoked onion, espresso bread sounds great -as usual.

Hope the new baking apprentice is working out well.

 

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks DA...the new apprentice is doing well so far.  Her name is Cleopatra and she definitely fits the name.

I am going to bake the Espresso bread tonight....my refrigerator is on the fritz so I hope it didn't over-rise but we will see

.