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Corned Beef and Cabbage - 2 ways - possibly more

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dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Corned Beef and Cabbage - 2 ways - possibly more

With your special St Paddy's Day bread that you specially made for corned beef sanwiches, here are a few ways to make corned beef and cabbage.

Corned Beef and Cabbage– two ways.

Corned beef is cured in a salt mixture, so it can be very salty, depending on the source. If the salt in your corned beef is an issue for you (some people like foods less salty than others) you might try bringing the corned beef to a boil in plain water first, discarding the water, and bringing it to a boil in plain water again, and again discarding the water, before proceeding with either of the cooking approaches outlined here

 Or, do what I do.  Simmer the Corned Beef for 2 hours per below (reserving the liquid) and then bake it for 1 hour and then broil it a few minutes.  I then simmer the veggies ( not the cabbage) in the corned simmering water the beef was cooked in for 30 minutes until done while I sauté the cabbage separately.  I have included a recipe for boiled cabbage at the end but don’t do it.  Sautéed cabbage is 10 times better.

 Ingredients

Corned Beef (simmered)

3-5 lbs corned beef (including spice packet)

5 garlic cloves, lightly smashed

10 peppercorns

4 sprigs fresh thyme

2 bay leaves

12 ouncesstout (recommended: Guinness)

1 cup beef broth or stock

Water, for simmering

4 yellow onions, cut into wedges

Simmer for 2 hours, remove corned beef and follow Corned Beef (baked-broiled) below

Corned Beef (baked - broiled) - Set oven to350 F

3-5 lbscorned beef simmered above

10 whole cloves

¼ - 1/2 cup hot sweet honey mustard

2-4 T brown sugar

 Put the cloves into the corned beef fat side.  Cover the top of (fat side) corned beef with the mustard and then the brown sugar.  Wrap in aluminum foil and bake for 1 hour.  Uncover and broil a few minutes until slightly browned on top.  See additional information below.

 Corned Vegetables – (simmered)

2 parsnips, peeled and cut into large chunks

3 carrots, peeled and cut into large chunks

6 medium red potatoes, scrubbed

 Add vegetable to the corned beef boiled liquid after the CB comes out and simmer for 30 min until done

Cabbage (sautéed)

 1 slice of bacon fried - reserve crumbled bits. I use thick sliced home made applewood smoked.

1 T butter and 1 T Olive oil

1 medium yellow onion, chopped

1 clove garlic, minced

1 large head of cabbage, sliced into 3/8-inch to 1/2-inch wide slices

Salt - probably not needed

 Follow additional directions below.

 Cabbage (boiled)

1 large head of cabbage, sliced into 3/8-inch to 1/2-inch wide slices

Additional vegetables such as a couple carrots (cut to1 inchpieces) and or several new potatoes (quartered)

 Additional Directions

 Corned Beef (Baked only)

 Preheat oven to350°F.

 Drain the corned beef from the package save the spice packet. Lay corned beef, fat side up, on a large piece of heavy duty, wide, aluminum foil.  Insert the cloves into the top of the slab of corned beef, evenly spaced. Spread the top with the hot sweet honey mustard. Sprinkle brown sugar over the top.

 Wrap the corned beef with foil in a way that allows for a little space on top between the corned beef and the foil, and creates a container to catch the juices. Place foil-wrapped corned beef in a shallow roasting pan and bake for 2 hours. (not

 Open the foil wrapping, spread a little more honey mustard over the top of the corned beef, and broil it for 2-3 minutes, until the top is bubbly and lightly browned. Let rest for 5 to 10 minutes, then place on cutting board and cut at a diagonal, across the grain of the meat, into 1/2-inch thick slices.

 Corned Beef (Boiled only)

 Place corned beef in a large (6 to 8 quart) pot. Cover the beef with an inch water. Add the contents of the spice packet to the water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to a simmer. Simmer for 2-3 hours, until the corned beef is fork tender. Remove from pot to a cutting

Cabbage (Sautéed)

Fry up bacon in a large pan until crisp reserving the crumles and leaving the fat in the pan.

Heat butter and olive oil (enough to well coat the pan) on medium high to high heat in a large, wide pot (8-quart if available) or large, high-sided sauté pan. Add chopped onions, cook for a couple of minutes, then add garlic.

Add a third of the sliced cabbage to the pan. Sprinkle with a little salt and stir to coat with oil and mix with onions. Spread out the cabbage evenly over the bottom of the pan and do not stir until it starts to brown. If the heat is high enough, this should happen quickly. The trick is to have the burner hot enough to easily brown the cabbage, but not so hot that it easily burns. When the bottom of the cabbage is nicely browned, use a metal spatula to lift it up and flip it, scraping the browned bits as you go.

 Once the cabbage in the pan has browned on a couple of flips, add another third of the cabbage to the pan. Mix well, then spread out the cabbage and repeat. You may need to add a bit more olive oil to the pan to help with the browning and to keep the cabbage from sticking too much to the pan. Once this batch has cooked down a bit and browned, add the remaining third of the cabbage and repeat.

Add in the reserved bacon bits and a squeeze of lemon to brighten it up at the end.

 Serve with the corned beef. Serve with boiled new potatoes. Can be made ahead and reheated.

 Cabbage (Boiled)

 Once you have removed the corned beef from the pot, add the cabbage and any other vegetables (carrots, new potatoes) to the pot. Taste the liquid. If it is too salty, add more water to the pot. Raise the heat until the liquid is simmering well. Simmer until the cabbage and any other vegetables are cooked through, 15-30 minutes.  Place vegetables in a serving bowl, add a little of the cooking liquid to the bowl.

 

Comments

mendozer's picture
mendozer

i like to boil it, then bake and broil with some kind of glaze.  if you don't want a glaze, then don't put it, but I still like that caramelized crust on my beef.  

it results in super tender meat with a crust, just like grilled meat (properly grilled meat)

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I like mine partially boiled to remove the salt, then baked with a glaze to finish cooking and then caramelized under the broiler too!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I might just BBQ grill it, instead of broiling it, at the end to caramelized the mustard glaze.

isand66's picture
isand66

Works for me!  I could do without the cabbage all together unless it's in a coleslaw.

Your recipe for the corned beef sounds very tasty and I'm sure goes great with your latest green and white bake.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

sauteed cabbage is the very best part of this meal by far.  My wife and daughter hated boiled cabbage but love it sauteed.

So what are you sneaking around to spring on us for St Paddy's day?

isand66's picture
isand66

I'm sure you're right about the sauteed cabbage....sounds much better than the boiled variety.

I didn't make anything specifically for  St. Paddy's day, but I did just pull a Hawiian  Alaskan style loaf (I think I'm losing what's left of my mind as I keep mistating the name of the bread!) out of the oven.  Interesting recipe using evaporated milk, butter and sourdough starter.  I just realized I forgot to make the glaze!  Never the less it turned out real tasty and looks pretty too.  I will try to post it tomorrow night as I need to try and get some sleep shortly.  I am thinking I may try some soda bread this weekend and maybe something else time permitting.

 

kozulich's picture
kozulich

I have an unglazed stonewear lidded casserole from Pampered Chef which I use for this recipe, but any lidded roaster would probably work.

Rinse and soak corned beef about 20-30 minutes in cold water.  Peel and halve a bunch of potatoes and place them cut side down in the casserole, which should be lightly coated with olive oil to prevent sticking.  Intersperse with coarsely chopped carrots and coarsely chopped onions. Place corned beef, fat cap up, on the bed of potatoes and sprinkle fat cap with seasoning packet.  No additional seasoning is needed.  Put lid on and place in a 200 degree oven for about 8 hours (assuming 3 lb brisket).  If St. Paddy's day falls on a weekday, I get it in the oven before work, and its ready when I get home.  The meat should have an internal temp above 185.  During cooking, the beef will release fat and juices which will drip down over the vegetables and marinate them.  Because of the low and slow cooking method, the corned beef will be fall-apart tender and juicy (as long as 185 internal is reached).  Nothing could be simpler.  For cabbage I just cut a cabbage in eighths, right through the core and steam them for about an hour.  Leaving the core in prevents the head from falling apart during cooking.  If you have room in your roaster, you can also just perch the cut cabbage on top of the brisket for the last hour of cooking.  This yields a drier, slightly more flavorful cabbage, but it takes a big roaster to do this.

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

any liquid to the potatoes and the meat ?

Thanks,

anna

kozulich's picture
kozulich

Nope.  In fact, when I cooked it yesterday, I twice had to get out my basting bulb and draw off the liquid produced by the meat and vegetables.  I ended up with about 8 cups of liquid, starting with dry ingredients.  The lidded roasting pan captures all the steam and juices.

kozulich's picture
kozulich

I used the salvaged liquid to parboil the cabbage (cut in eigths with the core holding each piece together), then finished the cabbage by sauteeing until caramelized.  It was tender and flavorful, but not too soggy.

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

I got mine in the oven right now, can't wait to see the results  :)

Thanks much,

Anna

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

a very good recipe  and it certainly is  way more simple than mine.  I still might be tempted to coat the beef in mustard, fry some bacon in the pan first and pour at least a little Guinness in to get the veg a little tipsy before it caramelized itself to death :-)

kozulich's picture
kozulich

I like the mustard idea, but I prefer to drink my Guinness instead of sharing it with the veggies.  In fact, that's just what I did.

Trialer70's picture
Trialer70

Another twist on the cabbage issue is cabbage strudel.  Saute the cabbage (in butter, of course) and wrap it in strudel dough or phyllo dough layers, brush with an egg solution and bake.  I've made believers out of cabbage-haters with this version. 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

sounds great!  If I had some left overs I would make it right now.  I have to admit that I cooked a slice of bacon to start the recipe without including it in the printed version so I am changing it :-)

isand66's picture
isand66

Wow...I would definitely like that!  Strudel dough, butter and a little cabbage....maybe throw in some cheese and how can you go wrong?

Trialer70's picture
Trialer70

Or bacon, crumbled. 

isand66's picture
isand66

I'm not even hungry DA, but your plate of food is making my stomach grumble!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

CB and cabbage did you end up with on St Paddy's Day Ian?

isand66's picture
isand66

Sadly, none....my wife is not a fan of either....:(

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

there is still Guinness :-)

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

the bacon drippings in the pan.  Do you then mix these with the oil and butter to brown the onions, garlic etc before adding the cabbage ?

Thanks !

anna

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

all buT 1 T of bacon fat, then add Butter and O oil.  But, you can leave out any one of the three or cut them each in half if you want and no one will know.  The key is to let the cabbage sit undisturbed until it caramelizes. 

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

night, tyvm !

anna

EvaB's picture
EvaB

in our house as a kid, that was one way of doing it, mom did it boiled just fork tender and served with melted butter and lemon juice and we ate a lot of that (cabbage was the cheapest veggie back then) I prefer to steam mine still cut in eighths with the core left connected. Serve with the lemon and butter. I steam almost any vegetable over boiling them, and prefer to steam over using a microwave for frozen ones as well.

I get lazy and buy the already made slaw mix from the store and fry it, or even the broccoli slaw mix and mix with the regular slaw, we have a delicious tasty meal. Now I know about the streudal dough and that is a good idea, so is Phyll0 dough and those would be tasty little bits for appatizers.

Mom would boil a cured ham (well a smoked shoulder or quarter of ham because she didn't have a big enough pot for a whole ham) to take the salt out, then roast it in the oven, and that is soooo good. She also boiled salt pork and then sliced and fried it, and we used to get salt cod which is dried board hard and you had to boil that to take the salt out, before you could do anything with it.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

me that my cabbage recipe is supposed to have a squeeze of lemon juice at the end to brighten it up.  My daughter has me writing down all my recipes so she can make a cook book out of them - and keep them alive after I am gone.  When you cook almost 100% by memory and don't do the recipe often enough you forget some key things.  Maybe it is just age too :-)  Anyway, for the past year or two as I cook, I write the recipe down on the computer.  Now that she gave me her old camera, I can take photos of them so she will remember what they are supposed to look like too! 

EvaB's picture
EvaB

My mother's favourite slaw dressing was a quarter to half cup of Pacific canned milk (no onther brand was allowed in the house, they were too sweet to her taste) with pepper, salt and lemon juice (about a tsp or more depending on her mood) and shaken up in a glass jar (never threw away a jar in her life, went through the depression) and poured over the slaw stirred and placed in the fridge to meld for at least an hour. Oddly enough its probably similar to ranch dressing, but I don't like the taste of ranch!

I have a book I am putting my favourites down in for my daughter, had better start putting in a few more things. Pictures would be great so maybe I need to start doing it on the computer!