The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Development Day Work with Nigel, 13th March 2012

  • Pin It
ananda's picture
ananda

Development Day Work with Nigel, 13th March 2012

  Development Day Work with Nigel, 13th March 2012

My friend Nigel came to meet me at Newcastle’s Central Station on Tuesday morning, early enough for us to get a full day of baking done.   I had arrived on the train, lugging a huge hold-all full of sourdoughs, leavens and various bits of baking kit, flour, etc.   Nigel had fired his oven the evening before, and a new  fire was roaring in it when we arrived at his house ready to start.

We reviewed my choice of recipes, looked over samples I had brought and then mixed these 2 doughs straightaway.   After that we talked through Nigel’s ideas and constructed recipes for him to work with.   Before he got started on these, we made a Ciabatta dough to turn into focaccia for our lunch.

The day progressed very well indeed.   We did all the preparation up in his kitchen using a 20 quart Hobart machine with the additional luxury of a 10 quart bowl being very useful to keep the mixing going.   All the doughs were given around 2 hours of bulk ferment before shaping and placing in bannetons.   By this time the sun had come out and the oven had been cleaned and shut down too.   This meant the sealed area around the oven was lovely and warm.   We took all the filled bannetons down on boards and set onto racks covered with a polythene sheet with a pan of water on a gas burner for steady moisture supply.   Everything was ready to bake in under 2 hours.   We managed to fit all the loaves into the oven on the one bake, with the temperature readings all sitting solidly around 250°C.

I had taken a Gilchesters’ Miche as a sample; this is photographed here.

For the development day I made more Gilchesters’ Miches plus some panned Moscow Rye.   So I had arrived at Nigel’s house with ripe wheat levain, plus the “sponge” constructed from rye sourdough and scald which is the basis of the Moscow Rye.

Details of Nigel’s bread choices are shown below.

Hastily we made contact with the Manager of Hexham Farmers’ Market.   We had to arrange to drop samples off with him ready for his Directors’ Meeting taking place this evening [Weds 14th March].   We wrapped up and labelled a selection of the best loaves, printed out the attached product information sheet and loaded them all into a nice, lined basket.   Nigel delivered the loaves.   Alison came to meet me after she finished work, and I drove us back home to Northumberland.

Well, this was great fun, and both of us were very happy at the quality of bread we produced.   So now we wait to see if our authentic Artisan Bread is wanted at Hexham Farmers’ Market; we shall see!

Details of all products shown below

 

Refreshment Details:

A] Rye Sourdough

Date

Time

Temp °C

Stock [g]

D Rye [g]

Water [g]

TOTAL [g]

11.03.2012

08:45

33

40

150

250

440

12.03.2012

06:30

26

440

450

750

1640

 

B] Wheat Levain

Date

Time

Temp °C

Stock [g]

Flour [g]

Water [g]

TOTAL [g]

11.03.2012

09:15

18

40

200

120

360

11.03.2012

19:00

22

360

400

240

1000

REFRIDGERATE OVERNIGHT; I then used 960g to make first batch of Gilchesters' Miche, and refreshed the remainder as follows:

12.03.2012

06:15

20

40

200

120

360

12.03.2012

18:00

18

360

300

180

840

12.03.2012

21:00

18

840

325

195

1360

13.03.2012

05:30

26

1360

300

180

1840

 

 1.    Gilchesters’ Miche

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe 1 [grams]

Recipe 2 [grams]

1. Wheat Levain

 

12.03.2012

13.03.2012

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

25

600

600

Water

15

360

360

TOTAL

40

960

960

 

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

 

Wheat Levain [from above]

40

960

960

Gilchesters’ Organic Farmhouse Flour

75

1800

1800

Salt

1.75

42

42

Water

58

1392

1392

TOTAL

174.75

4194

4194

 

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

25

-

-

% overall hydration

73

-

-

% wholegrain flour [approx 85% extraction]

75

-

-

FACTOR

24

-

-

 

 

Method:

    • Combine Farmhouse Flour and water in a mixer until clear.   Autolyse for one hour.
    • Add Levain and mix in speed one with the hook attachment for 8 minutes.   Add the salt and mix on first speed a further 7 minutes.   DDT 26°C.
    • Bulk Proof Times 2½ hours.   S&F at 1 and 2 hours.
    • Scale, divide and mould.   Rest 15 minutes.   Prepare Bannetons.   Re-mould.
    • Final proof 2½ to 3 hours.
    • Score tops and bake in wood-fired oven.
    • Cool on wires.

 2.    Moscow Rye Bread

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1a] Rye Sourdough

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

30

600

Water

50

1000

TOTAL

80

1600

 

 

 

1b] “Scald”

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

13

260

Red Rye Malt

7

140

Blackstrap Molasses

1

20

Caraway Seeds

0.1

2

Boiling Water

35

700

TOTAL

56.1

1122

 

 

 

2. “Sponge”

 

 

Rye Sourdough [from 1a]

80

1600

“Scald” [from 1b]

56.1

1122

TOTAL

136.1

2722

 

 

 

3. Final Paste

 

 

“Sponge” [from 2]

136.1

2722

Shipton Mill Organic Light Rye Flour

50

1000

Salt

1.2

24

Water

11

220

TOTAL

198.3

3966

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

30 + 20 = 50

-

% overall hydration

96

-

% wholegrain flour

50 + 50[997]

-

FACTOR

20

-

 

Method:

    • Build the sourdough as described above.   Make the “scald” as follows:   combine the caraway and the red rye malt and dark rye flour.   Weigh the molasses into a pan, add water and bring to a rolling boil.   Tip this onto the flour mix, and add any extra boiling water if there is evaporation.   Stir well to ensure full gelatinisation.   Cover and cool.
    • Once sufficiently cool, add the scald to the sour to make the sponge.   Cover and leave to ferment for 4 hours.
    • For the final paste combine the sponge with remaining flour and the salt, mix with the paddle beater in an upright machine, 2 minutes on first speed and 2 minutes on second speed.   Add water if needed [Previously, I added 220g which is 11% on flour].   Scrape down the bowl to ensure thorough mixing.
    • Bulk proof for 1 hour with DDT at 28°C.
    • Shape into a large Pullman Pan, plus a large and small bread pan prepared with lining of butter and coating of rye flour.   Smooth off the top.
    • Final proof for just 1 hour at 28°C, then bake.
    • Bake with lids on the bread pans for 3 hours in the wood-fired oven.
    • Cool on wires; wrap in linen and leave 24 hours before cutting into the bread.

 3.    Ciabatta Dough for Focaccia

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Biga

 

 

Gilchesters’ Ciabatta Flour

30

600

Dried Yeast

0.2

4

Water

18

360

TOTAL

48.2

964

 

 

 

2a. Final Dough –Bassinage

 

 

Biga [from 1 above]

48.2

964

Gilchesters’ Ciabatta Flour

70

1400

Salt

1.8

36

Dried Yeast

1

20

Water

50

1000

TOTAL

171

3420

 

 

 

2b. Final Dough – Wet

 

 

Bassinage

171

3420

Water

17

340

TOTAL

188

3760

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

30

-

% overall hydration

85

-

FACTOR

20

-

 

Method:

  • Make the Biga and ferment overnight.
  • Combine Biga with all other ingredients for 2a.   Mix on first speed for 2 minutes and second speed for 6 minutes with a hook attachment.   Scrape down as needed.
  • Add the remaining water, attach a paddle beater and let the dough down slowly.
  • Ferment in bulk for 2½ hours with S&F each half hour; wet stage.
  • Scale, divide and shape; dry stage.
  • Final Proof
  • Bake.
  • Cool on wires

 

Nigel Wild and Andy Smith’s Artisan Bread Samples

 

For Hexham Farmers’ Market Directors

 

1.    Gilchesters’ Miche

A Miche means a large loaf, and this bread takes its inspiration from the famous French baker, Lionel Poilâne and his own signature Miche.

It is made with a natural levain using Organic white bread flour.   The rest of the flour used is Gilchesters’ Organic Farmhouse flour which is a high extraction flour, typical of the type used by M. Poilâne.

 

2.    Gilchesters’ Farmhouse

These boules are made in a similar style to the Miche described above.

 

3.    Gilchesters’ White

Made with a white levain using Organic unbleached flour plus Gilchesters’ Organic Pizza flour in the final dough.

 

4.    White Boules

Lovely crispy crust in a flavoursome loaf made with a natural levain and Organic unbleached flour.

 

5.    Rye Cob

Distinctly tangy loaf made with a wheat levain and using Gilchesters’ Organic Pizza and Farmhouse flours and our favourite Organic Dark Rye flour from Bacheldre Watermill in Wales.

 

6.    Moscow Rye

One of the GOST Standard loaves as laid down in Soviet times, alongside the more famous Borodinsky and Rossisky loaves.   It uses Rye Sourdough which is mixed with a “scald” of rye flour, rye malt, molasses and caraway seeds to form a “sponge”.   The 3 stage process is known today as the Auerman process, but is thought to have originally been invented by the chemist, Borodin.   This loaf uses only rye flour; it is “wheat-free”.

 

All flour used is Certified Organic.   All bread is leavened using wild yeast/bacterial cultures, with no added Bakers’ Yeast.   All bread baked in wood-fired brick ovens.   Gilchesters' Farm is only a few miles from Hexham; as local as it possibly can be.

And more photographs of me enoying working on the oven!

 

 

Happy Baking everyone!

Andy

Comments

varda's picture
varda

Andy, Do you mean developing new business, breads?    Anyhow, doesn't matter.   I hope the Hexham Farmer's Market Directors know what to do with such a variety of quality, organic, local breads.    I read through your Moscow Rye with great interest - all rye, light rye for the final, caraway flavoring, 96% hydration.   Fantastic!  -Varda

eliabel's picture
eliabel

Thank you, Andy, very intresting. Wonderful breads.

 

Varda, can you read Russian? I've thought if you are interested in Russian rye breads, there is  a number of sites about them in Russian.

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi eliabel,


thank you so much for your positive comments.   Yes, I posted links about some of the great Russian bread websites here, and in the thread, Daisy_A and Faith added even better ones too.   http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/24237/celebrating-rye-breads   Of course the translation is not always great, and I don't speak any Russian at all, unfortunately.   The information from Faith on some of the recipes within the thread is very helpful indeed.

Best wishes

Andy

eliabel's picture
eliabel

Hi Andy

Many thanks for your answer. Russian is my mother tongue,  so if I can be of any help for you, I would be glad to do so.

I asked you and Varda if one of you can read Russian, because I have in my computer  a scan of the famous publication "350 Breads" . I believe that this scan is the copy of the first oficial (state made) complilation (1939) of the Soviet bread-baking tradition. So if you're interested in a recipe, I can look in this book.

Best wishes,

Olga

varda's picture
varda

Olga,  I don't know if you saw my message, but I don't speak Russian either.   The book sounds like it would be a fascinating snapshot of that era of bread.   -Varda

eliabel's picture
eliabel

Yes, Varda,  it is a real treasure. So you know, that this treasure is also yours. - Olga

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Olga,

Many thanks for this reply.   I will send you pm.   Any reply would be much appreciated.

Thanks

Andy

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Varda,

Nigel has been baking on his oven since late last Summer.   He asked me ages ago to go and spend a day baking with him, as he wants to work out a baking schedule which works for him and makes best use of what is actually a wonderful asset.   In most bakeries, the oven is usually the governing factor; I'm not sure Nigel is in that sort of compromised position...but he does need to sleep, and he has a full time job too, and a family.

This is actually the first day we have had free for us to get together and bake, although you may have seen this post here:

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/25868/two-leavens-some-wholegrain-and-commercial-mixer from November.   Nigel has a "baking day" one Saturday every month, and I managed to get to his November day.   I've been busy each baking day since, unfortunately.

Anyway, the Hexham possibility came up recently.   It's a beautiful town over in the west of Northumberland.   It's an hour's drive for me, but it's only 15-20 minutes from Nigel's house.   So our development day really turned into baking products we can sell as a joint Artisan Baking venture on Hexham Market once a month.

Yes, your reading of the Moscow Rye is spot-on.   I get really worried when the hydration is so close to 100%, but the Bacheldre Dark Rye is so thirsty, especially if using a "scald".   And there is nothing worse than rye paste which is stiff...it sets like concrete and doesn't move.   The feedback from Nigel yesterday morning was that he really liked this bread.   I am now committed to making all these loaves wheat-free, GOST standards not withstanding I'm afraid.   There is quite some demand for "wheat-free" bread.

Thank you so much for your comments

All good wishes

Andy

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Nigel has a very good friend and the local farmers market would be crazy to turn down the breads you guys turned out in one bake!!!  What a fantastic job.

Really nice bread.

ananda's picture
ananda

Thank you very much for your generous comments dabrownman,


We actually made 6 types of bread; 23 loaves intotal, plus 3 trays of focaccia.   Of course Nigel's oven is more suited to turning out 123 loaves; a dream to bake bread on!

Best wishes

Andy

isand66's picture
isand66

Great looking bread Andy...we all appreciate the time you put into your detailed posts.  That's some oven you are using!

ananda's picture
ananda

Hello isand66,

The oven takes 30 loaves scaled at 680g when fully loaded, and Nigel is aiming for 4 runs through it per firing.   He's not quite perfected it yet, but is not far away at all.

The detail in the posts is made easy in that I have to do this work for my business; that is just a given!   But actually, I believe that is really what Nigel was most wanting to gain from the baking day in the first place.

Thank you for your appreciation

Best wishes

Andy

Syd's picture
Syd

Looks like a very rewarding day indeed.  Great explanation of the loaves for the directors.  How could Hexham market not want those beautiful loaves! 

Holding thumbs for you Andy,

Syd

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Syd,

The reward was actually in the day spent baking with Nigel; it's long overdue.   However, I was delighted with the bread we both made.   We await feedback from the Hexham Directors.

Very good to hear from you, and thank you for your positive words

Very best wishes

Andy

sweetbird's picture
sweetbird

What a fantastic day, so well described. You certainly have many bakers from TFL, including me, cheering you on and wishing you and Nigel well! The directors will surely know quality when they taste it. Thank you for all the details.

Janie

ananda's picture
ananda

Thank you so much for your support Janie

Best wishes

Andy

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hello Andy,
Well, don't you and Nigel look justifiably proud of the beautiful bread you produced for the Hexham market directors!
Such an impressive display - I'm sure you 'wowed' them with the quality and variety of breads,
and with the use of locally-grown, organic Gilchesters flours too!
:^) breadsong

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Breadsong,

Do you know, I'm not sure I've ever enjoed my baking as much as I am enjoying it now; maybe that's the pint of all this?

My brother noticed the photograph is slightly out of focus; but I'll go with your comment if you don't mind: the bread was as good as either of us could have hoped for.

My best wishes to you

Andy

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Excellent efforts, andy!

I'am really one fortunate homebaker to have shared TFl membership with a devoted professional bakers such as yourself. You have the same hardcore baker spirit as Chef Hamelman!

Keep it up!

 

ananda's picture
ananda

Hello Khalid,

Like Mr Hamelman, I am a committed baker, and very happy to be part of the "profession".

I am also very touched by your comment; I have very far to go to match that sort of achievement, but I don't plan on stopping baking for many years yet.

Very best wishes

Andy

bertie26's picture
bertie26

Hi Andy

thanks forbthe blog.

the bread looks so beautiful and smart. I think the farmers market will be crazy not to have it there,

Bye cant wait for the next update.

Have a nice day

albert

 

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Albert,

We don't know what the feedback from the Market Directors is yet.   We know there is room for authentic artisan bread, and we also know what we produce is just about as honest as you can find...but that is no guarantee; yet!

It's really good to hear from you Albert

Best wishes

Andy

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi Andy,

All the loaves look fantastic - such a deep mellow colours with a lovely looking crusts and interior development. Really enjoyed seeing the photos of you and Nigel with the breads also - particularly the ones of you at the oven with the peel!

A great day and hopefully a Market Director who knows the value of great bread!

Very best wishes, Daisy

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Daisy_A,

How lovely to hear from you.   Thank you so much for your very kind comments.   Yes, working Nigel's oven with the peel transfers me back in time to running Melmerby ovens!

All good wishes

Andy

Franko's picture
Franko

Hi Andy,

Well another very productive day with your pal Nigel I see. What a splendid looking looking array of loaves the two of you have made for presentation to the market directors! If those breads aren't a shoe-in for a table at the market I can't imagine what would be, so kudos to the both of you for the exceptional  skill and dedication I see in all of your breads. Now I know that you fellows had a serious goal in mind for your days work , but it looks like you both had a good time together while you were doing it, which seems a pretty special reward just in itself. Great post Andy, and best of luck with the market proposal...not that I think you'll need any.

Franko 

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Franko,

Nigel and I were founders and co-workers in a food business in Newcastle upon Tyne back in the late 1980s.   We've therefore enjoyed many highs, and endured a few lows along the way, as that is the way business always goes.

But it's the enjoyable times we cherish, and the baking day on Tuesday was so much fun.   That the products all came out so well just made it even better.   Everything just seemed to fit together; even Nigel squeezing in the most rapid haircut before dashing off to deliver the samples...but that a whole new story superfluous to these pages!

Thank you for your ever kind, generous and supportive words Franko,

All good wishes

Andy