The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Butter and milk substitutes

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poindexter's picture
poindexter

Butter and milk substitutes

Hi all.

Are there any substitues to butter and milk called for in bread recipes (for example - white sandwich bread)? I have a problem with dairy products, so I preffer not to include dairy products in my breads.

Thanks

 

 

browndog's picture
browndog

Hi, Poindexter,

You can almost always substitute oil for butter in a bread recipe if it isn't something like a butter-reliant brioche. A light vegetable oil like canola will give you all the benefits without being too assertive in the final loaves. Then for fun you could experiment with nut or seed oils for flavor as well. A favorite bread of mine is Psomi, which has ground sesame seed and a generous dollop of sesame oil.

Dairy is usually present in a sandwich bread to add tenderness and a little flavor. But I like bread made without it just as well. You can certainly use any of the standard dairy substitutes in equal proportion, like soy or almond or rice milk. A good nutrition boost too. Potato water left over from boiling potatoes is an excellent addition. There's also beer, but I'm not sure we should call beer and milk interchangeable. A bad habit to get in to...

poindexter's picture
poindexter

Thank you browndog for you quick answer.

I usualy use olive oil instead of butter, but sometimes the flavour of the olive is too aggressive to my taste. I would try almond, rice and coconut milk.

 

edh's picture
edh

Hi Poindexter,

I've got the same problem as you, and have had great luck with both coconut milk and coconut oil (though I've never tried anything like brioche or croissants) for milk and butter, respectively.

I've used soy and rice milks in quick breads and muffins, but find their tastes too strong for regular bread.

edh

Ramona's picture
Ramona

I agree with browndog, that potatoes are a great way to add softness.  I add the mashed, as well as, the water.  And coconut oil and milk (organic) are great to use also.  Grapeseed oil is also a light and healthy oil. 

dryfire's picture
dryfire

Would goat's milk and butter still cause issues for you? Some people who can't take cow's milk based products seem to do fine with goat's milk (tastes better a lot of the times imo).

poindexter's picture
poindexter

Unfortunately I have problems with these too.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Hi there. Just finished an experiment using too much commercial yeast in a poolish. Flour, water, yeast, and after 36 hours mixed up a dough adding sugar salt more water and flour. The poolish was 2/3 the dough weight. I added a little too much sugar and when I handed taste tests to my nephews, their first response was that the texture reminded them of Brioche, soft chewy sweet. Tore like Brioche. They wanted more and ate it without butter or anything. No eggs or milk was in it.

So my point is this... try making a poolish with a good portion of your recipe and all the yeast, let it sit 24 hours, then continue. You will notice that Bulk fermentation times will shorten and also proofing times shorten after shaping. Try it and see. Maybe you won't need milk or butter. --Mini Oven

poindexter's picture
poindexter

Thanks Mini Oven, I'll try this technique. Could you please post the recipe you used?

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I came home later in the day and the rest of my mini loaf had been devoured. It was quite tasty. Well, I would say try the Cuban Bread, the recipe with 24 hour poolish. I think one teaspoon of sugar is enough for a one kilo loaf, it's only thrown in for the yeast.

Try this: take your favorite white bread recipe, take roughly 2/3 of the water in the recipe and add instant yeast, Then add 2/3 of the flour and stir everything together into a thick liquid paste. You might have to add more of the water. Cover and let the yeast play for 24 hours or more (27°c or 80°F) then add the rest of the ingredients. Let bulk rise (about an hour), and shape for final proof (about 30-45 min). Keep an eye on things because it will go quickly. If you are familiar with the recipe, then you will notice the changes a long poolish makes. I even got those tiny blisters in the crust like retarded dough. Cool.

--Mini O

poindexter's picture
poindexter

Thanks. I will try it.

martin's picture
martin

I bake vegan products just about every day. I replace butter/lard etc with coconut oil for the milk I use Oat milk (grind some oats and add water) and for eggs I use ground flaxseed mixed with hot water.

Using this method I converted  Peter Reinhart's BBA Cinnamon/Sticky Bun recipe. They come just as light as if I had used eggs, milk and butter.

 Its a bit tricky, especially in this heat (33 C) but I have even made Croissant using the same ingrdients.

Regards

 

Martin Prior 

www.bakerette-cafe.com

KipperCat's picture
KipperCat

Martin, I enjoyed a look at your website.  I'm not vegan, but coconut oil is on my list of ingredients to try soon.