The Fresh Loaf

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Quark

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AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

Quark

To our German/German-speaking friends:

What is the best US food item to use for genuine German Quark ?

Thanks all,

Anna

 

Yerffej's picture
Yerffej

Anna,

I have seen quark in stores in the states.  Have you seen this too or no?  If you have seen it,  is it not the real deal?

Jeff

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

in the stores here.

anna

 

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Alas, no decent Quark available in the US! A Vermont company makes quark, but it is hellish expensive and doesn't taste right. For my German Käsekuchen I use cream cheese, you don't miss the quark tang because of the addition of lemon zest, and it is lightened by whipped egg whites. (Neither ricotta, nor cottage cheese are adequate substitutes, their consistency and taste is too different, and farmer's cheese isn't quite right, either).

For other purposes I make a quark substitute with buttermilk:

QUARK (1)

2 quarts buttermilk (2 packages)

Pour 2 packages buttermilk (= 2 quarts) in a bowl with a lid. Place overnight in the oven at 150 F. The next morning, pour clotted buttermilk through a cheese cloth lined strainer, tie ends into a knot, and place (bowl with sieve) for several hours in the fridge, until drained (you can use the whey instead of water for bread baking).

There is also a method to make it with buttermilk starter (I haven't tried it out, yet):

QUARK (2)

1 gallon pasteurized whole milk

1 packet direct-set buttermilk starter

2 - 3 tbsp. heavy cream (if too dry)

Heat milk to 88 F. Add starter and mix well. Cover and let sit at room temperature for 24 hours, or until set. Pour mixture into collander, lined with cheese cloth. Tie corners into a knot, and refrigerate to drain overnight. If finished quark is too dry, add the heavy cream.

To make Sahnequark (cream quark): use 1 cup heavy cream/4 cups whole milk

To make Magerquark (low fat quark): use 1 - 2% milk instead of whole milk

For a creamier consistency: use 1 pint of light cream or half and half/gallon of whole milk

What are you going to make with quark?

Karin

 

 

 

 

 

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

duplicate our Quark.  I was going to make http://www.creative-sugar-studio.de/rezepte1.htm#Thüringer- Käsekuchen

and will try your suggestions.  My mom used to make the best Quarkkuchen with almonds and raisins.

Anna

Kellyosaussie's picture
Kellyosaussie

I'm with Karin - it depends what you want to make with it.

Quark is technically buttermilk cheese. Ie buttermilk culture is used to curdle the milk and left till it is of thick consistency, then whey is drained. Then cream is added for sahnequark.

Interestingly enough this is the same technique (diff culture) as yoghurt cheese and Greek yoghurt.

The closest textural substitute I have found is full cream Greek yoghurt, I have happily spread Zoi greek yoghurt on brotchen and jam and found it a pretty close sub. I have used it many times as quark speise desert sub as it has a decent tang - my three year old calls it cream. I never baked with it though. for those baked recipes I have always used cream cheese with a dash of lemon, vinegar or buttermilk to create the acid that is often needed for triggering the leavening agents

I have made my own there are recipes out there online, however where I am it is hard to find non pasteurized buttermilk as a starter culture. so here's what I have done when stumped. Grabbed my fav tangy yoghurt and some cultured buttermilk. Mixed the two together till I found an approximate taste. Then in multiple layers of cheesecloth/or superfine mesh (I use a shower curtain like fabric) then drain for several hrs till I get a consistency I want. Usually a cream cheese consistency, then add a few table spoons of cream to get a quark consistency.

With kids and adversity to making as little mess as possible, the Zoi yoghurt is just my easiest alternative....

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

and pasteurized buttermilk might just do the trick.  I have to look on the can, I bought some powdered buttermilk in the Mexican food aisle, I believe, it is from Nestle.

Thanks much,

Anna

 

Kellyosaussie's picture
Kellyosaussie

Oh I have seen it at good cheese/wine shops. I have seen it at beverages and more in ca, plus a wine and cheese store in Missouri. I think you could just call your local cheese store and ask. They probably could get it in for you too.

CarlSF's picture
CarlSF

Hi Anna,

I have heard that Costco might have Quark.  However, I am not a member of Costco, so I really can't confirm if Costco has it or not.  If I find Quark, I would not be surprise if it's really expensive and the taste or texture might be different from the real thing in Germany.

Carl

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

is over 1 hour away but I will certainly look. You got me to thinking. I might also check BJs since we have a store locally.

Thanks !!

Anna

 

sabinemcgrady's picture
sabinemcgrady

I am in Ohio, even though we have lot's of stores and even a big Amish community nearby, they are not familiar with Quark. I have also tried the Quark from Vermont, my daughter  got it for me at whole foods as a surprise, but it was very expensive and not the right taste or consistency.  An old neighbor gave me some advise to make my own, similar to what Karin described above, but I haven't tried it.  For German style cheesecake I use cottage cheese.  I just take a hand blender and smooth it out with that a little, it works just fine once it's baked and it's much lower fat than cream cheese.  You can also use ricotta, but it's more expensive and the cottage cheese works just fine for baked goods. 

Off course, that dosn't really work for fresh Quark use, like Quark with fruit, Quark Sahne (Torte), Quark with Herbs etc.  That I save for visit's to Germany at this point.

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

taste, but with a little luck and lots of blending, we might come close :)

Anna

 

GermanFoodie's picture
GermanFoodie

is a German import store, they sell Quark, but at OUTRAGEOUS prices. I have to disagree w/ hanseata, I have been using either ricotta for my German cheesecakes, or a blended mix of 3/5 cottage cheese, 1/5 cream cheese, 1/5 sour cream (make sure you put this through a food processor and blend it well in order to get rid of the curd in the cottage cheese).

The only other option you have is to make it yourself, but using whole milk instead of buttermilk - or even raw milk, if you have access to that. Google it, there should be recipes around.

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

might work !  I will have much to do next week :)  Thanks so much !

Anna

 

hanseata's picture
hanseata

but ricotta has a gritty consistency I don't like in dishes I make with quark. I tried a pureed cottage cheese/sour cream mix, too, it's halfways okay.

Unfortunately I never saw whole fat Greek yogurt here around, it's all low or no fat (I hate being fat censored).

Karin

GermanFoodie's picture
GermanFoodie

you will likely have to make it yourself. I'm w/ you on the "low-fat" thing - YUCK. As for the consistency of ricotta, I'm only using it for baking and very successfully, the consistency has never mattered. :)

aecummingsII's picture
aecummingsII

Anna, 

Here's a link to an online German store:www. germancorner.com/recipes/hints/quark

I bought the quark maker a couple years ago and I love it.  I can't swear to the authenticity of the taste since I have never been to Germany but I really like it in pastries.

Phyllis

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

for yoghurt ?  Neat machine, thank you for the link !

Anna

 

aecummingsII's picture
aecummingsII

I have made quark mostly and use it for pastries.  Though suddenly I have a taste for some good yogurt too!!

clazar123's picture
clazar123

There is a dairy culture called villi ( a Finnish yogurt)that has more of a sour cream/buttermilk taste than the buttermilk you buy at the grocery store these days. I bought a culture starter from Seeds of Health.

http://www.culturesforhealth.com/starter-cultures/yogurt-starter.html

 It cultures at room temperature and is self renewing. If you make it with full fat milk or even cream it is absolutely sinful! It may need to be drained somewhat if you want a marscapone or greek yogurt consistency. It sounds similar to the quark you are talking about but may be easier to make.

sonia101's picture
sonia101

Thanks so much for all the links, I'm going to read them and look into quark made from yogurt, I curious as to the taste difference....I love quark!

I make my own from buttermilk because Quark is $35.00 a kilo in Australia and very hard to find. I use it for sweet pastries, pizza bases, sweet dumplings and my cheesecake. Making my own also leaves me with the Whey which I use in gravies, cakes and bread.

 

 

 

 

Thanks Sonia

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

seems that the Quark Torte looks very German :)  Nice.

Anna

 

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

of the cheese cake ?  It looks just like my Mom's.

Thanks much !   Oh, btw, yesterday I received the cultures to make my own Quark.  Let's see what happens :)

Anna

 

sonia101's picture
sonia101

Sure Anna, I'm heading out but I'll add the recipe here tonight :) The cake looks like my Mum's also because I use her recipe lol

Oh I can't wait to hear how you get on with the cultures and making quark!

Sonia

sonia101's picture
sonia101

Cheesecake

Base

200 grams plain flour

65 grams butter, unsalted (room temperature)

65 grams sugar

1 egg 

pinch of salt 

Add plain flour in to bowl and rub softened

butter into the flour. Add remaining ingredients

to form a soft pastry. Grease a 26 cm

spring form tin and place shortcrust dough on bottom of spring form tin and also pressing it up 3/4 of the sides.  Refrigerate until filling is prepared.

 

Filling

750g Quark

100g sugar

4 egg ( Separated)

I packet vanillin sugar

3-4drops of lemon essence

1 packet cheesecake help(OR 2 ½ tbsp. custard powder)

1 cup milk

 

Mix everything ( Not egg whites)until smooth with a mixer.

Beat 4 egg whites until firm and fold into

the quark mixture.

 Add cheesecake help ( or custard powder) and 1 cup of milk.. Beat together.

 Mix well and fill into the baking pan laid out with the dough for the crust and bake at 350F (170C)

on the middle rack for approximately 60 minutes. Switch off the oven and allow the cheesecake to totally cool in the oven with the door slightly open.

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

I just have one question.   The cheesecake help and 1 cup of milk does that get  folded into the quark mix ?

Appreciate it !

anna

sonia101's picture
sonia101

Hi Anna,

Sorry I must have been half asleep still this morning!

Mix everything ( Not egg whites)until smooth with a mixer. Add cheesecake help ( or custard powder) and 1 cup of milk.. Beat together.

Beat 4 egg whites until firm and then gently fold into the quark mixture.

 

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

thanks, Sonia !

moussky's picture
moussky

Check out Hawthorne Valley Farm, Ghent, New York  12075.  518-672-7500.

I have seen QUARK  at the Farm Store  -  no question they can help you on this.

A lot of German people in this (Rudolf Steiner, Anthroposophical) group.

Check out their website.  -  Big biodynamic farm  - they grow vegetables on

our land.  I have seen pastries there with Quark/fruit filling.

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

for making quark with several choices of their cultures and rennet and their products are the least expensive I have found so far.

http://www.cheesemaking.com/Quark.html

Best,

Anna

 

aytab's picture
aytab

I'm so glad I found this thread, I had never heard of Quark before I read this. I live in Southern California and I use a lot of Queso Fresco in my baking. Queso Fresco is a fresh Mexican Cheese some refer to it as Farmer's Cheese as well. This Quark sounds very interesting and I'm gonna have to try my hand at making some. I love this website!!!! I get exposed to new food and baking things all the time. 

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

This site is truly unique, so many talented wonderful people from all over the world.

Anna

 

berliner24's picture
berliner24

There is some quark now coming available in CA.  Elli quark which is a spoonable type of German quark.  A few of my colleagues ran across it at the local market.  I have to say it did bring back some childhood memory just trying the plain.  Suppose ill try a fruit version next.  

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

I recently found some in the local commissary, it was produced in Vermont.  It was ok but not sure if they extract each and every taste nuance out of the milk here in the US before being allowed to come to market.

berliner24's picture
berliner24

Yes, yes I have also seen that one.  Its a bit on the pricey end but you are correct its quite different.  This one in my local market is quite nice.  Its noticeable even the color of the products from Germany to Canada to US is also different.  Now I must convince my wife to let me try my hand at kasekuchen!

pepperhead212's picture
pepperhead212

Here is a link for Making Quark - the only one of 4 cheesemaking supply places I have dealt with  that mentioned it.

Dave

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

I have purchased a few items from them and just love Ricki's newsletter.

Tam38's picture
Tam38

Margit Stoll Dutton has an easy to make Quark recipe in her (out of print) book The German Pastry Bakebook. It looks fairly easy. You clabber milk with buttermilk and than cook it until its solid. 

Here's a link to the recipe. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/germancooking/message/5611 

I was hoping to find Dutton's blog. She put a bunch of her recipes up from her book because it was out of print, but when I checked this morning it had been taken offline.