The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

San Francisco Sourdough Loaf

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Sheblom's picture
Sheblom

San Francisco Sourdough Loaf

Hi

Here my first go at an all sourdough loaf. No commercial yeast to be seen. I baked this loaf using the San Francisco Sourdough Loaf recipe from Peter Reinhart Artisan Bread Everyday book. This is my first go at a just soughtdough recipe and I am quite happy with the results. I think then time I wont use a loaf pan and try a boule shape or batard shape. Please have a look and let me know what you think. Cheers

 

Loaf:

 

Crust CloseUp Crust

 

Crumb:

I have also submitted this post to YeastSpotting : http://www.wildyeastblog.com/category/yeastspotting/

Comments

gmagmabaking2's picture
gmagmabaking2

Sounds really good, but, your pictures are not there to see.  Sorry to tell you that.

Sheblom's picture
Sheblom

Hi man

I have sorted out the image problem. Was getting "this is spam message" and could not post up the pics. But its now all sorted. Please have a look and let me know what you think.

Cheers

isand66's picture
isand66

Hi Sheblom,

Looks like you did a pretty good job.

I love Peter Reinhart's books and have been using his techniques in Artisan bread everyday for many of the breads I have been baking lately.

Give the boule and batard shapes a go next for sure.

Ian

Sheblom's picture
Sheblom

Thanks Ian

Peter ReinhArts books are awesome, I am busy saving up so I can get The Bread Bakers Apprentice by him. I really like his writing style. Its very easy to read.

I am defiantly going to give the boule and batard shaping a go. Will need to give it some practice though to get a nice tight shape.

Thanks again for you kind words.

Cheers

isand66's picture
isand66

Don't mention it!  I recomend that you master one recipe and once you get that done, you can easily experiment by changing different flours, and adding extra ingredients like nuts, cheese, rolled oats, etc.  Even though bread making can be very scientific, in the end once you have a good recipe you trust, it is easy to modify to create an unlimited number of variations.  I am baking a sourdough bread with avacados and oat flakes tonight....don't know if it will work, but if nothing else I will have a pretty bread to put on my blog!

Good luck.

ian

rbhunsaker's picture
rbhunsaker

Wow Ian, avacado sourdough, now that's out of the box.  Let us know how it turns out and how you incorporated the avacado, chunks or smooth. 

-- Russ 

isand66's picture
isand66

It actually came out pretty good.  I let it rise a bit too long due to I was baking another bread at the same time and making dinner and writing my blog....the end result was a disappointing oven spring, but a real tasty bread.  I will post the results as soon as I can.

--Ian

isand66's picture
isand66

Recipe is posted a few minutes ago.  I hope you enjoy it.

Ian

rbhunsaker's picture
rbhunsaker

Hi Ian, what's your blog address? 

-- Russ

isand66's picture
isand66
EvaB's picture
EvaB

that's for sure, I never have been a good bread maker, but I keep trying, and maybe just maybe I will win one of these days!

Sheblom's picture
Sheblom

Thanks for that. But dont get me wrong I am still striving for the perfect loaf. To me this loaf is still not quite right. I still have issues with proofing. When is it under proofed and when is it over proofed. I think with us home bakers its just trial and error and just keep at it!

rbhunsaker's picture
rbhunsaker

I've tried Peter R's recipe more than a dozen times with marginal sour results.  As I tell folks, my sour bread failures make for excellent French bread.  But just can coax the sour out of it.  Perhaps it's my location in San Diego?  As we're reading, I've got another batch going using Peter R's starter and thefreshloaf's old post of getting more sour out of sour dough. 

Sheblom's picture
Sheblom

Hi

His recipre is pretty good. I was also left a bit wanting on the sour notes of my loaf. I cant say much if its location based, as I am in Auckland, New Zealand. I do know that my sourdough will taste different to the one in San Fran as that strain of yeats is only found in that area.

What i am trying now to hopefully get a more sour note, is to get the dough ready over a 3 day process. So one the Wendday get the starter going and leave over night and most of the next day. Thursday night, mix the final dough, and leave it all night and most of friday. Friday, punch it down and leat proof to saterday morning where i will do the final shape and let it rise to be naked later that Saterday. I am hoping this will bring out the maximum flavour, but will ahve to wait and see I guess.

Cheers

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Looks Lovely, Sheblom! and from the first try? I'am impressed.

Sheblom's picture
Sheblom

Thank you very much, I am hoping my next sourdough loaf, the Pain au levain will be better. I will post up about this later on in the week. 

Thanks again

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Sheblom.  Yes, I'm guessing the beasties in NZ are different than SF but not that different either. Coaxing sour out of SD bread is a life long quest for sure.  TFL post on that subject is a good place to start.  I love SD where the jam won't fall through huge holes.  Most of my breads are loaves for sandwiches, with small holes as a result.  Sour may come with bigger holes though :-)  You keep at it and that sour you seek will be found!!!!