The Fresh Loaf

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lard - healthier than shortening? how unhealthy?

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KipperCat's picture
KipperCat

lard - healthier than shortening? how unhealthy?

This post is a bit off topic as it's really about nutritional quality of the ingredients rather than baking quality. 

A recent post on trans fats got me thinking about good ole lard.  I've never cooked or baked with it, but I understand it is available for purchase in many places now.  My addled brain says that it is in fact less of a health problem than the hydrogenated vegetable shortening which replaced it.

I cook and bake with butter - OK, sometimes way too much butter. From a nutrition standpoint is lard really any different?

mariana's picture
mariana

 

Hi KipperCat,

 

some say that lard is healthier than butter, because it contains less saturated fat than butter, more monounsaterated fat than butter and has no additives or impurities, like butter has (unless you get organic butter) - colorants, atnibiotics, hormones, etc.  Be careful with lard sold in stores. It's hydrogenated and bad for you. Lard should be rendered at home at low-temperature.

 

http://www.foodandwine.com/articles/lard-the-new-health-food

KipperCat's picture
KipperCat

Mariana – What a great article!  I’ve occasionally rendered small amounts of beef fat, and may someday try making lard.   At first I was really bummed to read that the lard sold in stores is hydrogenated, but an online search revealed to me that there are some unhydrogenated brands out there.  Farmer John was mentioned as one such, but a quick perusal of their website didn’t address the issue.  They are a west coast product, not one I’ll find locally anyway.  Possible sources for fresh lard are farmers markets and butcher shops.  As a general rule, if the lard isn’t refrigerated at the grocery store, it’s probably hydrogenated; though the label should state one way or the other.

Prairie19's picture
Prairie19

To make small amounts of lard you can buy some fresh side pork. That's the same cut of the hog as bacon, but it is not smoked or salted. It's easy to find in most groceries in the north central USA and I've seen it in some oriental food markets. You can buy it sliced. Cook some up, just as you would bacon, strain the drippings for breadmaking and enjoy the fresh cooked pork. You won't get enough fat for deep frying, but then that is not our purpose, is it.

I still remember my grandfather folding a slice of fresh side pork into a fresh slice of buttered bread and proclaiming it to be the best part of the hog.

 

 

dausone's picture
dausone

You can also ask your local butcher or farm for leaf lard and render it at home as well. According to wikipedia... "The highest grade of lard, known as leaf lard, is obtained from the "flare" fat deposit surrounding the kidneys and inside the loin. Leaf lard has little pork flavor, making it ideal for use in baked goods, where it is treasured for its ability to produce flaky, moist pie crusts."

tjkoko's picture
tjkoko

I believe that fatty deposits surrounding the kidneys are known as suet.

pattycakes's picture
pattycakes

Is beef fat, I think.


Patricia

browndog's picture
browndog

Hi, Kipper,

I would defer to Mariana about butter vs lard, and from what I've read, yes, they both are preferable to hydrogenated shortenings because of the trans-fats issue, as you say.

I don't think you can truly beat a lard and butter pie crust. This coming from a die-hard vegetarian. 

Trishinomaha's picture
Trishinomaha

I had a great aunt in Tennessee that made the most incredible biscuits - a handful of this and a handful of that. I was quite small when I watched her. Years later, I tried to recreate these biscuits - after many, many recipes I finally found the secret - lard (and White Lilly Flour which I brought back with me when I traveled there). Also as BD stated fabulous in piecrust. A figure the small amout used won't kill anyone and the baked goods are so yummy.

 Trish

KipperCat's picture
KipperCat

Browndog and Trish - I've heard that about piecrusts, and that prompted this question as much as anything. I've saved Alton Brown's butter-and-lard piecrust recipe but never tried it.

The biscuit comment brought back memories of my Grandmother. When she was widowed (around 1940) she went to work as a baker at the local hotel. Years later when my aunt lamented that she couldn't make biscuits as good as Grandma's, a friend reminded her that "nobody else ever made biscuits as good as your mother's either" Since Grandma used lard to fry donuts, I imagine she used it in the biscuits as well.

For anyone in Texas, Central Market carries White Lily flour.

qahtan's picture
qahtan

 This used to be one of the adds in UK, or it's better with butter.

 Which I personally think butter is better,,,,, If I am going to eat fat I would rather eat butter than all this other stuff that is suppose to be better. qahtan

KipperCat's picture
KipperCat

I could never see the point in eating margarine either.  There was a time when my finances meant I had to make a stick of butter last a very long time, but it was worth eating when I did eat it.

subfuscpersona's picture
subfuscpersona

article link The Rise and Fall of Crisco

Brief but informative article on the invention, in the early 1900s, of that new fangled product, Crisco, and the story of its marketing to the American public, beginning in 1911.

 

maggie664's picture
maggie664

Lard has 41% SFA, 12% PSA and 47% MSA
Beef fat has 52% SFA, 4% PSA and 44% MSA
Butter fat has 66% SFA . 4% PSA and 30% MSA
Chicken fat has 31% SFA, 22% PSA and 47% MSA
Olive oil has 14% SFA, 9% PSA 77% MSA

SFA = Saturated Fatty Acids
PSA = Polyunsaturated F A's
MSA = Monounsatureated F A's

"Understanding Nutrition" Whitney, Hamilton and Rolfes

From memory my mother's home-rendered lard was fine in pastry but tasted a bit porky in anything sweet! Each to their own I guess. I certainly wouldn't buy commercial solid lard because of the SFA's and/or trans F.A's in it. M

KipperCat's picture
KipperCat

I have read references to short chain fatty acids and long chain fatty acids, but I don't  remember the details.   The gist was that not all saturated fats are the same, and some fats (like coconut oil) can be saturated, and yet still be part of a healthy diet.  I've no idea how accurate this is, but hope others may post a better understanding than I have.

Jeffrey's picture
Jeffrey

My family has always used shortening ("less fattening than lard" HAH), now they use lard.  Never being the avid cook in the family, i just followed along.  Picked up a few tricks, but still have a bit of trouble making those pretty loaves you see in pictures.  Fun to make and eat any way.

 

Any way, what do you think would be good for greasing our pans.  We don't see any lard besides that on the shelf in the baking section.  With olive oil at $20 a can, and corn oil tasting funny, besides not being a sure nonstick surface.   This sure seems to limit my choices.

 

What does everyone recommend, as a healthy alternative, that doesn't cost so much we can't make bread, leave a funny taste?

 

btw corn oil and shortening, do make a nice fire.

 

 

jeffrey

 

 

sphealey's picture
sphealey

Lecithin mixed with oil is the usual recommendation. In the US Mazola makes an olive oil + lecithin spray that works well for me.

sPh

Paddyscake's picture
Paddyscake

canola with lecithin and an olive oil spray. I use the canola for baking and find no taste at all. I don't know if it's just me, but when I have used other brands I find the nozzle foams up and drips. The Crisco brand doesn't. The ingredients also list dimethyl silicone, for anti-foaming. It's the last ingredient listed..so perhaps I'm ingesting a minimal amount of silicone? Ick..I think I'll stop reading labels.

dausone's picture
dausone

No. Keep reading. Thats what I did, and I stopped using Crisco and canned sprays altogether, went straight in the trash! I do like those pump sprayers though, where you can fill up with olive oil, pump and spray, although they do clog more often then not. :)

Jeffrey's picture
Jeffrey

This sounds much easier than coating your fingers with grease, i'll have to pick some up.  Wikipedia, has lecithin, of course it has everything.  After all the five syllable words, it does seem like a safe, natural product. 

maggie664's picture
maggie664

Hi Kippercat,
You are correct regarding the non-threatening effect of coconut oil on human health. The saturated fats of coconut oil have been proved to be non-atherogenic. This means that they don't contribute to the development of heart disease as other lipids do, which also have a high proportion of saturated fat-(otherwise cultures where more than half their daily calorie intake is from coconut oil eg Samoans, would have all succumbed to heart disease long before they were exposed to the questionably healthy Western diet.
Once coconut oil is hydrogenated (a chemical process by which hydrogens are added to unsaturated or polyunsaturated fats which makes it more solid (saturated) and more resistant to oxidation).
I haven't got the % of SFA of coconut oil at hand, but it is very high. M

dausone's picture
dausone

1 Tablespoon serving size


 


Total Fat 14g


Saturated 13g


Polyunsaturated <.5g


Monounsaturated <1g


 


This is Nature's Way Coconut Oil, cold pressed.

maggie664's picture
maggie664

Hi Jeffrey,
I use grapeseed oil as a fat for appropriate recipes eg carrot cake but use canola spray for greasing pans. It gives a quick release of products and doesn't taint the food but have never read the label to see what else is in it. M

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

is very neutral. Never noticed any flavor. Mini Oven

Jeffrey's picture
Jeffrey

Thank you, i almost forgot about canola oil.  We were happy with it before, then used it up and had a non cooking break.  We'll have to get some more.

 

Don't think i ever heard of grape seed oil, sounds interesting.  I'll tell my wife to keep an eye out for that, she spends more time shopping than i ever will.  We do go together from quite often though, she likes that.

 

Wait! at this rate we'll have as much oil as flour, oh well.  Move over canned goods...


jeffrey

 

maggie664's picture
maggie664

Hi Jeffrey,
Grapeseed oil is available here in NZ. Can't believe that we have a product that ?USA hasn't already got! M

Susan's picture
Susan

EVOO, expeller-pressed Canola Oil, and Grapeseed oil from my local ethnic grocery are my standard cooking oils. Grapeseed oil is readily available here.

Susan from San Diego

maggie664's picture
maggie664

Hi kippercat,
Thought I'd add a bit more re lipid biochem. I am referring to lip[id molecules.

Fats (or lipids) consist of molecules with a 'backbone ' of glycerol to which 3 fatty acids are attached. All glycerol molecules are alike, but the fatty acids may vary in 2 ways; length of the carbon chain and degree of unsaturation.

A fatty acid is an organic acid. An organic acid consists of a chain of carbon atoms with hydrogen atoms attached with an acid group (also attached) at one end.

It is a bit difficult to demonstart all this without diagrams, so I'll stop here unless you want more info.

The general nutrition message is to use food choices which keep the fat content down to at least 30% of total calories in a day. But further knowledge is needed to ensure that saturated fatty acids are kept low and monosaturated fats are elevated. Margarines have been criticised because they contribute too many polyunsaturated fatty acids which throw the % of necessary monosaturated F A's out of kilter.
Fats, anyway, are necessary pe se as they provide a medium for the absorption of fat soluable vitamins (ADE&K) and low fat diets (10% fat) in the past have caused nutritional problems resulting from fat soluble vitamin deficiency. I'll leave things there.......M

KipperCat's picture
KipperCat

Maggie, thanks for all the info, particularly on coconut oil.  I know that a lot of people use it and like the flavor a lot.  Maybe I'll give it a try.

wholegrainOH's picture
wholegrainOH

good to have all these details on various fats, and to hear folks' experience.  My grandmother also was famed for her biscuits, and also used lard, often rendered from pigs offered by members of my minister grandfather's various southern churches.  As vegetarians, we miss the biscuits.  We use canola, olive, grapeseed, peanut oil, and lecithin for various kinds of cooking, plus flaxseed oil, hemp oil, and sesame oil for flavoring/accents.  And occasionally hazelnut oil, although not too often.
Alan

KipperCat's picture
KipperCat

Have you tried coconut oil?  A lot of my healthier-eating/natural-foods acquaintances love it. 

sphealey's picture
sphealey

Sounds as if you have tried quite a few vegetable oils.  Have you ever seen a brand of avocado and/or grapeseed oil that does not carry a nut contamination warning?  I've checked all the brands of those oils at Whole Foods, Trader Joes, and our regional high-end grocery store and they all have a nut warning (usually peanut although sometimes other high-oil nuts).  I guess it is too easy to use the same presses for grapeseed oil and nut oil, but then again there are non-contaminated soybean and sunflower seed oils.


Would apprecate any pointers.  Thanks.


sPh

Ramona's picture
Ramona

Margarine was originally manufactured to fatten turkeys.   When it killed the turkeys, the people who had put the money into the research wanted a payback, so they put their heads together to figure out a way to do that with this product to get their money back.  It was a white substance with no food apparel, so they added yellow coloring and sold it to people to use in place of butter.  How do you like it?  They have come out with some clever new flavorings. 

Do you know the difference between margarine and butter?  Both have the same amount of calories.  Butter is slightly higher in saturated fats at 8 grams compared to 5 grams.  Eating margarine can increase heart disease in women by 53% over eating the same amount of butter, according to a recent Harvard Medical Study.

Eating butter increases the absorption of many other nutrients in other foods.  Butter has many nutritional benefits where margarine has a few only because they are added.  Butter taste much better than margarine and it can enhance the flavors of other foods.  Butter has been around for centuries where margarine has been around for less than 100 years. 

Margarine is very high in Trans fatty acids.  Triples the risk of coronary heart disease.  Increases total cholesterol and LDL (this is the bad cholesterol) and lowers the HDL cholesterol (the good cholesterol).  Increases the risk of cancers up to 5 fold.  Lowers quality breast milk.   Decreases immune response.  Decreases insulin response. 

 And here's the most disturbing fact:  Margarine is but.....ONE MOLECULE away from being PLASTIC.   Purchase a tub of margarine and leave it in your garage or in a shaded area.  Within a couple of days you will notice a couple of things:

* No flies, not even those pesky fruit flies will go near it (that should tell you something).

*It does not rot or smell differently because it has no nutritional value; nothing will grow on it.  Even those teeny-weeny microorganisms will not a find a home to grow.  Why?  Because it is nearly plastic.  Would you melt your Tupperware and spread that on your toast?

 At one time coconut oil received negative press in the US because of it's high level of saturated fat.  However, modern research has shown that not all saturated fats re alike and that the fatty acids in coconut oil, the medium chain triglycerides, do not raise serum cholesterol or contribute to heart disease like the long chain triglycerides found in seed oils.  Also, most research done on coconut oil in the past was done on hydrogenated coconut oil, which has been altered from it's original form.   Approximately 50% of the fatty acids in coconut fat are lauric acid.  Lauric acid is a medium chain fatty acid, which has the additional beneficial function of being formed into monolaurin in the human or animal body, Monolaurin is the antiviral, antibacterial, and antiprotozoal monoglyceride used by the human or animal to destroy lipid coated viruses such as HIV, herpes, cytomegalovirus, influenza, various pathogenic bacteria including listeria monocytogenes and heliobacter pylori, and protozoa such as giardia lambia.  Some studies have also shown some antimicrobial effects of the free lauric acid.  These fatty acids and their derivatives actually disrupt the lipid bacteria, yeast, and fungi.   As a functional food, coconut oil is now being recognized by the medical community as a powerful tool against immune diseases.  Another incredible fact about coconut oil is that even though it is a fat, it actually promotes weight loss.  The fatty acids do not circulate in the bloodstream like other fats, but are sent directly to the liver where they are immediately converted into energy, rather than be stored as body fat.  Medium chain fatty acids found in coconut oil also speed up the body's metabolism burning more calories and promoting weight loss. 

Here is another interesting fact:  Unsaturated oils in cooked foods become rancid in just a few hours, even in the refrigerator, one reason for the "stale" taste of leftovers.  However, eating fresh unsaturated fats is even worse, because once inside the body, they will oxidize (turn rancid) very rapidly due to being heated and mixed with oxygen.  Not so with coconut oil.  Coconut oil does not turn rancid and since it reduces our need for vitamin E, whereas unsaturated oils deplete vitamine E, it may contain antioxidant properties.   Using expreller pressed or organic coconut oil will give you many health benefits. 

Thought you might want this information

 

maggie664's picture
maggie664

Hi Ramona,
Thank you for all the information. Could you please provide reference(s) to cover your statements. I'm not intending to challenge you on some points but would just like to know from where your information was sourced. Thanks, M

Ramona's picture
Ramona

Hi Maggie, that is fine.  You should always check out information to see if it is creditible.  www.coconut-info.com  is one good place for coconut information.

www.gardenoflife.com also is a good source for information, as well as, product.

There are alot of sites on the internet about this.  It is not so hidden anymore. 

 

Oldcampcook's picture
Oldcampcook

So I can go back to eating my coconut without worry???

I noticed in one of the research articles that palm oil was also mentioned.  When I was stationed in Germany, my mother-in-law fried everything in a palm oil based shortening.  Wonderful flavor to everything fried in it.  Almost as good as the lard I grew up with, everything being fried in it.  LOL

Bob 

hedera helix's picture
hedera helix

If I may go off toic from this off topic conversation, Palm Oil is a big no-no.

It is experiencing a massive increase in use, which is being supported by planting new plantations in areas that have been clear-felled in South East asian tropical rainforests. Huge, vast, areas are being cleared at massive environmental cost. One species that is suffering massively from this is the Orang-Utan which lives in these forests.

I'm an ecologist, this is a bit of a hobby horse for me, but steer clear of palm oil unless you want to be complicit in the potential extinction of one of our primate cousins.

browndog's picture
browndog

Thanks for this, Hedera. I had no idea. Are you an ecologist in the professional or cosmic sense, (or both, eh?)

It feels like the hurrier I go the behinder I get, trying to be adequately informed about the impact of my consumer decisions. *sigh* 

hedera helix's picture
hedera helix

I'm an ecologist professionally - tragically I'm stuck counting flowers in the UK for a living, not checking up on tropical primate numbers. Still, not a bad way to make a living.

browndog's picture
browndog

I don't know, I've heard it phrased in terms of 'documenting the decline'. In any event I honor you for your efforts. And I could feature flower-counting in England.

leemid's picture
leemid

I cannot give definitive reference to the time that coconut oil lost its favor in the US, but do remember the moment some 8 or 10 years ago (who can remember dates and times anymore?) when that rediculous outfit took on movie theater popcorn, said it should be banned, because it had that nasty coconut oil on it. Apparently they thought it would kill you outright. What other conclusion were we to make about their campaigne, unless some of us are eating movie theater popcorn as a main staple every day?

Well, these idiots had been on a rampage for some years about banning all kinds of things so I went out to the local popcorn supplier and bought my first coconut oil for popcorn. It also contains some nasty beta-carotene for color. Now that stuff will kill you! ;) The result was that my already excellent popcorn was much better and more authentic to the movie experience. Why, just last week I began using it in making kettle corn, and it was the best I ever made! That surprised me, actually, because it has a low smoking point which shouldn't help in popcorn popping, according to the experts.

That's my story,

Lee

Ramona's picture
Ramona

That's right Lee, coconut gives great flavor to popcorn.  I love it in scrambled eggs as well.  Actually, I have read in several places, that it has a relatively high smoke point and I use it as such.  I also use grapeseed oil (expeller pressed) for a high smoke point.  You can put either on food items that you want to grill and the food won't stick and it adds to the flavor and it doesn't burn.  I try to use a couple of tbsp. of coconut oil every day somehow because I want the health benefits. 

Bob- I have also learned that red palm oil is also very healthy.  After I looked into it, though, the price kept me away.  I like the flavor of the coconut and so, lean towards it.  The Jarrow organic is very affordable. 

Be careful about what you buy, only get the expeller-pressed or organic.  Don't buy refined.

leemid's picture
leemid

I did not know this term so I looked on the web and found this:

"Expeller pressing is like cold pressing except that extreme pressure is added during the pressing. As much pressure as 15 tons per square inch is used to squeeze the oil from the fruit or seeds. The high pressure also produces high heat (as high as 300ºF ) through friction, so the oils produced with the expeller process cannot be considered cold pressed. The oils obtained with this method retain much their flavor, aroma, and nutritional value, but not to the extent of cold pressed oils."

I suppose that's alright...

I did some research on smoking points for fats and butter is 350F, coconut oil 350F, refined versions of various fats have higher smoking points, avocado is highest at 500F+, peanut oil is 450F which is good for wok cooking. I don't know what avocado oil tastes like...

Lee

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Avocado oil sounds exotic.

KipperCat's picture
KipperCat

It sounds like it would add a wonderful flavor.  Next time I'm at the health food store I'll look for a small bottle.

Nut oils are wonderful for salads, and I might try some in a sandwich loaf someday.  They have a pretty low smokepoint though, so not good for cooking.  Nut oils, like many other specialty oils need to be refrigerated once opened. It probably wouldn't hurt to keep them cold before opening either.

Oldcampcook's picture
Oldcampcook

for the tip on the coconut oil  And thanks to Leemid for looking up expeller processing, saving me the trouble!

maggie664's picture
maggie664

Hi Ramona,
Thank you for the references re above. I have enjoyed updating my knowledge as I no longer professionally practice dietetics.
I also found www.purecoconutoil.co.nz on the net and read about how new tecniques in pure coconut oil producion have been introduced to Independent Samoa. My husband and I have just returned from a fortnight there and now understand why we spotted villagers with truck loads of dehusked coconuts travelling on the roads! As I have only weak lengths with the Dietetic Association of NZ I am eager to find out now what policies exist regarding the nutritional applications of such in NZ! I also hope our Polynesian residents
will have access to affordable coconut oil to use. M

maggie664's picture
maggie664

Hi hedera helix,
Am I correct in presuming that hydrogenated palm oil is used world widely in fast food frying? If so, it would take more than conscientious souls like we, who are found here, to save those beautiful Orang-Utans. M

hedera helix's picture
hedera helix

It's sadly true that Palm Oil is a huge global business, and it may seem futile for one person to change their habits, but the choices we make add to the problem, and if we few make the right choice, it adds to the right choices being made by many others elsewhere. A thousand ripples make a wave.

We can also be a voice of conscience for others, letting them know that an issue exists.

 

SusanWozniak's picture
SusanWozniak

I use butter and olive oil.  I sometimes have purchased almond and avocado oils but didn't notice any appreciable flavor.  I bought them because they have a higher smoking temperature.


I have participated in discussions on other threads of butter v. lard and vegetable shortening in pie crusts.  I never use anything but butter and see no reason to use shortening or lard. Please, I do not want to hear about flakiness.  Bought some pies that were marked down that had vegetable shortening crusts and my then teenaged son and his friends refused to eat them.


However, I recently heard that it is not lard per se but leaf lard that should be used in crusts.  I also recently heard that food fried in lard absorbs less grease.  I do not know anything about either of those statements.


If you live in an area where there are small scale pig farmers, you might consider purchasing lard directly from the farm.  Pigs produce a great deal of lard!

proth5's picture
proth5

I've used home rendered leaf lard in pie crusts for years.  It has a very different flavor than butter, but one that I consider to be smooth and savory.  (I sometimes blend it with butter - it depends...) I also use leaf lard (not the stuff you buy in the supermarket in the generic "Lard" tubs) in heritage recipes from my grandmother - who specifies lard as the fat. Even she switched over to vegetable shortening for a few years because it was "healthy."  She switched back.  Leaf lard is the only way to get the flavor we all remember. Oh, and tortillas (not a heritage recipe in my family...).  They are the best.


Since I have been hand fabricating my butter, I have come to appreciate leaf lard.  Frankly, from a food production point the pig has been killed.  Why not use all of it? Compared to the overhead of butter, leaf fat is relatively easy to render.  Cut in pieces and cook slowly.  Done. Of course you get a by product of all those lovely cracklings - good plain or in a fougasse (for example.)


I've tried hard for the past year on all this "locavore" stuff.  (Olive oil may be good for you, but the trees won't grow in Colorado...) It's hard work.  So now I've decided to eat what I like and let the food fight it out inside.  Leaf lard is definitely part of that...


 


 

hullaf's picture
hullaf

In the 'olden days' when I was young growing up in Wisconsin, the dairy state, we had butter. My husband's family was quite poor and used to go over the state border to buy margarine (and incidentally, they did get a packet of a yellow substance to add to the margarine to make it yellow.) We always cooked with butter but made pie crusts out of lard. We drank whole milk at every meal. 


This is a good review on oils and fats. Thanks for all the talking. I'd love to find that leaf lard. I'll have to explore.     Anet

colinwhipple's picture
colinwhipple

We had margarine in Minnesota (late 50s, 60s?), with the yellow food color packet.  It was apparently illegal to sell with the yellow food coloring already mixed in.


Colin

SusanWozniak's picture
SusanWozniak

We never had margarine growing up because my father remembered the old margarines of the 30s and 40s that were white sticks of fat that had to have the yellow coloring added.  He thought they looked repulsive white, so we ate butter.  


We, too, drank whole milk and although my high school classmates drank low fat, I could never stand it and I never gave low fat milk to my kids.


 


Proth5 -- I agree that the locovore regime is difficult, particularly for someone who loves Mediterranean food.  Yum!  I was just reading an old magazine from 1994 featuring regional dishes from France with pies made from butter and I will buy French butter without shame.


 


i did know that tortillas were made with lard.  Because of that Lyle Lovett song which may be called, "Nobody Knows Me Like My Baby," we love eggs-over-easy-in-flour-tortilla.  


 


Truthfully, I think we need to remember Julia Child's conclusion: eat everything but in small amounts.

hsmum's picture
hsmum

For all you Canadians out there, the National Post has an article on this very subject in today's paper, affirming previous posts that lard is the healthy choice.  Go figure.  My chocolate chip cookie recipe has been redeemed.  :)


Karen

pattycakes's picture
pattycakes

Here's an article that I wrote on McLaren's book FAT awhile back for the Santa Fe New Mexican. It has three recipes using lard and a lot of information from the book, which is very authoritative and well-researched.


BTW-not all flour tortillas (even homemade) are made with lard; many are made with shortening. Check the label to be sure.


http://www.santafenewmexican.com/Food/1231LEDE-Lard


Patricia