The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Tartine's aromatic Semolina Bread + Walnut and Sage Wholewheat

  • Pin It
PiPs's picture
PiPs

Tartine's aromatic Semolina Bread + Walnut and Sage Wholewheat

I have wanted to bake the Semolina sourdough from Tartine Bread for some time now. The heady mix of toasted fennel and sesame seeds held within the golden crumb sounded like a delicious combination beneath a crunchy encrusted exterior.

Finding the durum flour proved to be quite a challenge though. It took me more than a few visits to organic grocery stores until I discovered a small bag tucked away on a low shelf from a New South Wales company specialising in pasta and durum based products.

It has been some time since I last baked with durum flour and I was a little nervous with the amount of water that the Tartine formula called for … 80% Hydration! … however the dough developed strongly over a three hour bulk ferment and shaped easily into batards. The seed coating looked beautiful as they quickly rose in cloth-lined baskets … it is hot and humid again in Brisbane.

The hot oven in the hot kitchen punched the wet dough upwards and I couldn’t help but let out a small sigh of relief as watched the oven spring unfold. This is aromatic bread. The crumb is full of vibrant fennel seeds with the sesame seeds playing a much smaller role in the flavour profile.  The crumb is sturdy but not tough … the fennel flavour is sturdy also - bright and savoury. I would be inclined to reduce the amount of fennel seeds just to allow the sesame flavour to show through a little more.

By the end of a week in the fridge, my desem starter is keen to step out and stretch it’s legs after pushing its bed of flour upwards to a cratered top. Keeping the ideal cool temperatures is an impossible dream at the moment so my next best option is to feed sooner and watch its development closely.

The idea for the Walnut and Sage bread surfaced during a week of afternoon bus trips home. I knew I wanted to bake a whole-wheat desem bread studded with walnuts and I loved the idea of incorporating a sweet honey walnut paste similar to a concept used by Dan Lepard. The idea of sage came after … to balance the added sweetness brought by the honey.

 


Walnut and Sage 100% Wholewheat

Formula

Overview

Weight

%

Total dough weight

2140g

 

Total flour

1081g

100%

Total water

919g

85%

Total salt

20g

2%

Prefermented flour

162g

15%

 

 

 

Desem build – 4 hrs 26°C

 

 

Starter (50g not included in final dough)

75g

50%

Freshly milled wheat

150g

100%

Water

75g

50%

 

 

 

Walnut Paste

 

 

Walnuts

50g

 

Walnut oil

20g

 

Honey

20g

 

Water

50g

 

 

 

 

Final dough

 

 

Desem starter

243 g

26%

Freshly milled organic wheat flour

919g

100%

Water

788g

85%

Walnuts lightly toasted

300g

32%

Walnut paste

140g

15%

Chopped fresh sage leaves

1/2 cup

 

Salt

2og

2%

 

Method

  1. Mix desem starter and leave to ferment four hours
  2. Mill flours and allow them to cool before mixing with cold water (Hold back 50g of water) from fridge and autolyse four hours.
  3. Combine walnut paste ingredients and mix till smooth with motar and pestle.
  4. Lightly roast remaining Walnuts and allow to cool.
  5. Add desem starter to autolyse then knead (French fold) 5 mins. Return the dough to a bowl and add salt and remaining 50 grams of water and squeeze through bread to incorporate (dough will separate then come back together smoothly) then knead a further 10 mins. Add Walnut paste, roasted walnuts and chopped sage leaves and squeeze through dough until combined.
  6. Bulk ferment two hours with two stretch-and-folds 30 mins apart.
  7. Preshape. Bench rest 20 mins. Shape.
  8. Proof for 1 hour at 28°C
  9. Bake in preheated dutch oven at 250°C for 10 mins then reduce temperature to 200°C and bake a further 10 mins. Remove from dutch oven and bake on stone for a further 20 mins.

 

After allowing them to cool I couldn’t wait any longer to try a slice. The knife sliced through the delicate soft crumb with ease. The walnut oil and walnut paste softened the crumb and coloured it the lightest purple. There were some lovely walnuts protruding from the crust but Nat’s quick fingers saw to them … I am sure they would have been distracting for the photos anyway :)

The sage flavour sits at the back of the palette complimenting the walnuts – you breathe it in - a perfect balance. So much so that the bread moves effortlessly between sweet and savoury settings. Perhaps a late breakfast with honey and ricotta or a slice toasted with blue cheese and glass of red to accompany one of our favourite pizzas on a Saturday afternoon watching the sun slowly set.

… our version of Jim Laheys Zucchini Pizza – with added red onion and pine nuts.

Cheers,
Phil

Comments

varda's picture
varda

encrusting on the semolina bread.   I have been thinking about bread books lately and was contemplating starting a thread about people's top three, but I like your idea better which is to speak with pictures.   So here's back at ya

PiPs's picture
PiPs

Thanks varda,

Great idea about the books! I recognise quite a few of those ... I can't see myself buying any more books for a while ... Thom Leonard's book was the last one ( ... and it was second hand)

Cheers,
Phil

ananda's picture
ananda

....my baking-related books, that is!

Hi Phil,

The desem bread is just sublime, I can't imagine how good that will taste.   I'm really glad to see you post on durum, as Australia is renowned for producing top quality durum wheat, I believe?   It sounds like you had to work hard to find it, however.

All good wishes

Andy

PiPs's picture
PiPs

... how about ya top three books then? :)

I am really chuffed with the desem bread ... it's SO nice. I can probably source durum in larger quantities but I still don't understand why it's so hard to come by ... your right Australia is renowned for it's durum though I think a large amount of it is exported. The durum flour I found had no specs or nutritional chart so I am in the dark about it apart from its baking qualities and there was quite a lot of colour/minerals in the flour - more a light golden tan colour than yellow.

Cheers,
Phil

 

ananda's picture
ananda

Hamelman's "Bread: A Baker's Book of Techniques and Recipes", Wing/Scott "The Bread Builders - Hearth Loaves and Masonry Ovens" and Pyler's 2 volume "Baking Science and Technology" are the Top 3.   Love Elizabeth David's "English Bread and Yeast Cookery" and Suas "Advanced Bread and Pastry and DiMuzio is good too, and and and....

A

PiPs's picture
PiPs

Hamelman's book is fantastic and I am not sure why it's not in my collection but I have never heard of Pylers "Baking Science and Technology. Will have to google that one. I leafed through Elisabeth David's book in a store one day and found it fascinating but was not sure how I would incorporate its recipes into my day to day baking. I enjoyed the stories in Daniel Leaders book as well when I borrowed it from a friend.

mmm ... My top three?

Wing/Scott "The Bread Builders - Hearth Loaves and Masonry Ovens",  Chad Robertson's "Tartine Bread" and Maggie Glezer's "Artisan Baking" ... I'm a bit the same ... hard to pin it down to three, but I have learnt the most from these books with the added bonus of reading enjoyment.

Made a promise to myself of no more bread books for at least a year ... we'll see how I go :)

Phil

Wyatt's picture
Wyatt

I have the other two you mention and have considered buying Pylers book but its rather pricey for a gamble, what is it you like/dislike about it? I haven't seen any reviews about it. I noticed someone called it " a beast of a book" though its two volumes.

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi

I have very little use for bread books which are, in the main, recipe books.   I can do all that myself quite easily.

I want books that teach me new things.   And I also teach baking for a living.   Pyler's book is the manual which helps me stay the essential steps ahead of the students.   I do use other scientific texts as well, but this one is a complete baking manual.

My 2 volumes cost just £25 imported from the US.   How I came to pick them both up at that price is another story.   But, expect to pay well over £100 for the pair.   That is standard pricing for academic texts.   For Confectionery, I like Street's book.   For sourdoughs Kulp and Lorenz are excellent.   For industrial bread Cauvain is top notch, especially his book on Chorleywood Bread Process.   Calvel's book translated by Wirtz and MacGuire is also a must.

Best wishes

Andy

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Oh, Andy, we lesser beings stand with our mouth agape, in awe....... (just kidding!)

I do admire your profound knowledge that you share with us so graciously. I still need recipes for inspiration, and, also, am too curious to see what's all out there in the great wide baking world to rely just on my own knowledge.

Best wishes,

Karin

 

 

Wyatt's picture
Wyatt

I agree about not wanting "recipe" books per se. A recipe can be somewhat useful as an example of a style but I find myself adapting those to my liking anyway, I also tend to do wild fermentation as I find them much more interesting. At any rate I'm looking for texts which will improve my knowledge, technique etc, to help me further develop my own styles and interpretations not collect a lot of redundant recipes. I know there are a lot of holes in my knowledge, many of which I'm probbably not aware, but I can't afford to go to school right now as I have a couple of business's I'm trying to get going. I also want to get some idea about how to ramp up production without sacrificing quality as I'm working on a pretty small scale right now as a cottage industry

I mainly grow produce, used to work as an electronics engineer, but have this interest in fermentation, kind of started with beer wine etc, including wild fermented styles such as Flemish Reds and Lambic replications. Somewhere along the line caught the wild fermented bread bug and started getting serious about it though I've never had any formal training. I been baking for for myself for about 30 years but started selling artisan bread at the markets for extra money in the winter and its sort of taken on a life of its own to the point where people started hunting me down when I took a break from it. Now I get people petioning markets for me and taking my bread to restaraunts etc without my knowledge. This is a bit new to me as I never got close to that sort of support from the public selling organic produce but then good bread is scarce here in most of the US. I'm just a self taught amature but I do use my imagination and am not afraid to experiment, expanding my limitations. I've learned a lot on my own though I realize its just the tip of the iceberg.

I'm working on getting a CSA style operation going in addition to the markets. A CSA is a community supported system where people buy into a subscription service. I had planned to use bread as a way to get people to buy into a produce service but the bread seems to have more interest which is frustrating becasue I really like being an organic farmer and I like the hours better LOL. I like baking bread alot too though so I'm counting my blessings but I could use more sleep. I realize this is an uncoventional approach but it seems to be working so far though I've got a long way to go.

I found a used set of Pylers Book set online for $80,00 US but its the 1973 edition which I assume is the second?. I also found a 1982 edition for $99.00 US which I assume is the Third? They didn't say what editions they were and though I've heard there are 4, I've seen more than that online and wonder if some of the dates are simply printing dates. How much difference is there between these additions and which would you recomend? I'm on a low budget and the hardback 2010 editions go for over $300.00 us. I also noticed some of the older editions are listed as new, which is strange unless there is some value to having an older edition instead of the later ones.

I've also heard Michel Suas's book - Advanced Bread and Pastry is pretty good though I've heard its geared more toward a French tradition which I don't want to limit myself to.

Sorry to bother you with this, its just hard to judge these things without looking at them. I've tried talking to lacal bakers but mostly get confused looks or advice to do things in a more mundane way so it hasn't helped. If you have any other advice about my situation I'd be very grateful as well. I've kind of bitten off a lot, maybe more than I can chew but I'm trying to make a go of it. Makes life interesting anyway

Thanks for your advice

Wyatt

Floydm's picture
Floydm

I love it, Phil.  Beautiful, beautiful, beautiful.  

May I feature this post for a bit?

-F

PiPs's picture
PiPs

Thanks Floyd,

That would be really great ... thanks :) Good to hear from you.

Cheers,
Phil

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Wonderful loaves, Phil, I'd love to try those.

Karin

PiPs's picture
PiPs

Thanks Karin,

Your wholewheat and walnut breads from last week spurred me into action. Thanks for the inspiration!

Cheers,
Phil

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Enjoyed the beautiful photo's too!  

Sylvia

PiPs's picture
PiPs

Hi Sylvia,

Thanks ... It's a great feeling when you take a handsome loaf from the oven ... makes taking the pics a lot easier as well :)

Cheers,
Phil

tangoempress's picture
tangoempress

These are great images  - of one of my favorite bread recipes from Tartine - Whole Wheat & Walnut but adding sage is inspired.  Way to go!

Allison

PiPs's picture
PiPs

Thanks Allison,

Tartines Semolina Bread is a really lovely loaf. We made a tomato and basil bruschetta the other night with it ... Great match!

Cheers,
Phil

Jeremy's picture
Jeremy

Amazing grigne on your semolina, I have been fiddling with durum of late, but my schedule is proving a pain in my neck!

My rye levain I fear is overly sour or too old so I failed to rise a loaf of your any grain bread...totally dysfunctional baking this month! Maybe it was the hemp seed? Whacky bread!!

 

Always a pleasure to admire your baking...fabulous!

Jeremy

PiPs's picture
PiPs

Thanks Jeremy,

Sorry your any grain loaf was sad :(  ... I was getting pressure put on me to bake some those on the weekend ... I think some heavy rye would be nice again soon.

Never used hemp seed before ... mmm (sound of brain ticking over)

cheers,
Phil

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Your photography is stellar!

I haven't made the Semolina bread from Tartine Bread. It looks like a winner.

David

PiPs's picture
PiPs

Thanks David,

I highly recommend the Semolina Bread - perhaps adjust the fennel seeds depending on your love of their flavour.

Cheers,
Phil 

wassisname's picture
wassisname

This is not the first time you’ve put together so many wonderful flavors and aromas that I can’t even keep them straight in my head, Phil.  Brilliant!  And beautiful, as always.  The crumb of the desem loaf is just perfect.  I’ve made bread with sage, but never thought to combine it with walnuts.  I’ll be making a note of that combination for future use.

Marcus

PiPs's picture
PiPs

Ha Ha, thanks Marcus,

What I can't portray in the photos is how soft the Walnut and Sage crumb is. The oil in the Walnut paste has made a real mark on the finished loaf.

I snuck another slice when I got home from work today... yep it's still good :)

Cheers,
Phil 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

What a pro!!!  I don't think they could be any better. Such attention to detail, your skill shows itself so easily.  The tastes must be as good as the smells.  Thanks for the recipe too.

PiPs's picture
PiPs

Thanks dabrownman. Everything really fell into place for this bake ... nice to have days like that. Hope you try the walnut and sage one day ... it's a nice combo.

Cheers,
Phil 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

on the bucket list :-)

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I just found an un-opened can of Walnut Oil in the cupboard that must have been there since around 2002.  Ummm....10 years old....... I wonder if it is still good?  Only one way to find out I guess .......  Oopppsss....No walnuts in the freezer for some reason.....Got to go to Sprouts and get some, after I start a levain build....... be back later.  No sense kicking this bucket down the road any longer :-)

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hello Phil,
The Tartine Semolina is one of my all-time favorites - your version is gorgeous.
And the walnut-honey paste, combined with walnuts and sage - amazing combination - and I'm sure equally good for sweet and savory, as you say.
Wow.
:^) from breadsong

 

PiPs's picture
PiPs

Thanks so much Breadsong,

I wasn't prepared for the amount of flavour in the Semolina Bread. Wasn't until I tipped all the roasted fennel and sesame seeds on to the dough that I stopped and went .... Oh my!

Great to hear from you...

Cheers,
Phil 

 

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Hi Phil,

Abusolutely stunning loaves!

I am interested in your desem starter. How does your desem starter smell like? Does the bread have an earthy or bitter flavor?  

Your posts really amaze me every time.

Thank you so much for sharing,

Akiko

PiPs's picture
PiPs

Thanks for kind words Akiko,

The desem starter has a sweet wheat smell when I can keep it within the right temperature range - around 18C is best I find. Its not bitter or earthy at all unless its fermented to far or too high in temperature. I watch it pretty closely during summer to avoid this. The wholewheat breads I make with fresh milled flour are not sour at all - they have a natural and clean flavour.

So glad you are enjoying the posts.

Cheers,
Phil 

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Very interesting information, Phil..

May I ask one more question?

What percentage of water is in your desem starter at the refrigerator and the room temperature when you refresh?   I am very curious about natural yeasts now. 

P.S I have made your olive bread for several times. :)  I like your olive bread very much, especially the crumb!  Very soft.  When I used fresh herbs for it that was my mistake, it came out quite bitter... I was shocked.. then I ate a piece of them 5 days later( I kept it in the freezer ) ..then I didn't taste bitter at all.. the bread was pretty good.

Thank you for sharing your great formulas..

Akiko

 

 

PiPs's picture
PiPs

Hi Akiko,

I am really happy that you like the olive bread.

I keep the desem starter at 50% hydration. It is fed using a 1:1:2 ratio ... this works well if I can keep the temperatures under control. I am thinking about a small wine fridge to help during the summer months :)

Cheers,
Phil

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Thank you so much, Phil!   I think that is great idea to keep the starter in a small wine fridge.   I am looking for a used crappy refrigerator to ferment baguettes in the summer... :)

Thank you again,

Akiko

Ebooyens's picture
Ebooyens

Phil, these are stunning!  Just wondered if you had some advice for coating a loaf in seeds as whatever you're doing seems to work really well! :)  Do you just roll the shaped ball in the seeds before proving?  Just feels like it's all going to fall off when I try it... Thanks!

Eugene

PiPs's picture
PiPs

Thanks Eugene,

Yeah, the loaves were shaped, then rolled on a fairly moist towel before rolling in the seed mix. I placed them in cloth lined baskets for the proofing.

Cheers,
Phil

Ebooyens's picture
Ebooyens

Appreciate the tip Phil, will most definately have a go!

Syd's picture
Syd

Lovely baking and excellent photography, Phil! Your pictures tell the whole story and demonstrate an incredible attention to detail. A pleasure to read.

Syd

PiPs's picture
PiPs

Thanks Syd,

I really am trying to tell a story of a day in my kitchen. Glad its coming across well.

Cheers,
Phil 

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Now that is bread passion, Phil!

Photos shown above are like something taken out of a New peter Reinhart or Hamelman or Dan Lepard cook books!

I'am curious, as to what flavor difference does a desem have iver a typical wild yeast biga. Do you maintain a desem out of convenience only?

 

PiPs's picture
PiPs

Thanks Khalid,

That's a great compliment ... It's a funny thought considering the photos are taken my old flour covered kitchen :)

The desem starter if kept at ideal cool temperatures (I like 18C) brings a clean fresh flavour to the bread if fermented correctly using fresh milled flour. I don't find it sour at all. I like using the fresh milled flour for a starter and the desem serves the purpose nicely, plus it survives quite happily in the fridge between refreshments. 

Cheers,
Phil

lumos's picture
lumos

OK, I'm a late-comer, again. :p

Great loaves, again, Phil.   You have such wonderful artistic flare in shaping/scoring/decorating loaves and how to present them; something you must've been born with. 

Dark colour of walnut and sage loaf is really  beautiful (Belated congrats on the top page feature! ) but I also like the open crumb of Semolina sourdough, too.   I so understand fennel seeds can be overpowering.  I often regret adding just a liiiitle too much in cooking.  Sometimes less is more.  (I know in theory, but....:p)

PiPs's picture
PiPs

Thanks so much lumos,

I feel I still have some way to go with decorating the bread - breadsong's stencils for example are beautiful - not sure I am going there though :)

I really love the fennel flavour but I think it could use a liiiiittle less :) ... next time perhaps.

cheers,
Phil

pdiff's picture
pdiff

Are you sure it's legal to post photos like that here!?  Those are gorgeous!  Makes me want to drop work today and go home and bake. Been reading through Tartine this week.  Duram is on the list now :-)

Beautiful!  Thanks for the great (if not distracting) start to the morning!

 

Pdiff

PiPs's picture
PiPs

Ha Ha,

Perfectly legit ... you can enjoy as much as you like :)

It's a great book ... and the semolina bread is well worth making.

Cheers,
Phil

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

-

PiPs's picture
PiPs

Seems TFL had a few hiccups this morning,

I received your wonderfully generous comments through email ...

You make smile Mini - ear to ear!

It is not fair that we get to see all these wonderful breads on the fresh loaf but rarely get to really experience them. I keep all my flour sacks - I have a rather large pile ... I have a few plans for them ... mmm ... bread book eh? Hamelmans' might be a bit large for it though :)

Cheers,
Phil

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Here is the evidence!  Plain as walnuts and seeds.   It is just too much!   Oh dear! I must have died and gone to heaven (or overdosed my carbs) 'cause I just can't explain it any other way.  I see but I just can't take in the aroma!  Knew I was a gonner when I went and clicked on a walnut centerfold!

Blam!  POW!   Flattened like an overripe sourdough (I would just love to fall slow motion backwards into a pool of the stuff, gotta be rye tho) maybe with your combo of seeds toasted on top.

Wow!  Just look at those waves of toasted seeds!  Oh Phil!  the only thing better than this is ... is ... smell o vision.

Where is that starter?!   I need a ripe sniff back to reality!  My sage is frozen under fresh snow...   Wait one minute!    Noses work in heaven!

"Smells like heaven"   yup, that kind of expression's gotta come from baking seeded loaves.  And walnuts and sage.  Hmmm.   Sage often takes on the flavour of wild berries if it grows crispy green and cool.   Oooo, I can image-a-smell that.

Are you saving the Durum flour sack?   Is it big enough to use as a gift tote for a loaf?    or a new bread book? 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

When I saw it up in triplicate,  panic set in where seeds had grown.  yikes!    Did some fast erasing.   not fast enough I see.

Got an e-mail, huh?    You are so sweet!       

A whole pile of flour sacks?   Hmmm.   :)    The gears are turning...

Pages