The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Brachflachen Mehrere Vollkombrot

  • Pin It
dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Brachflachen Mehrere Vollkombrot

Before TFL came into my world, I had a multi grain, seeded, SD challah that I baked every week for my daily sandwich loaf. I called it my made up name Brachflachen Mehrere Vollkombrot. It was the standard; mix about 20 ingredients, kneed for 10 minutes let rise, punch down, let rise in the loaf pan, egg wash, slash and bake a 350 until 205 F. It took about 8 hours from start to finish - and I thought that was slow bread!! After finding out the slow bread was really 3 days - not 8 hours, I converted my old recipe to make it take nearly forever to make - instead of just a really long time :-) Now it is a 12 hour levain build, long S&F ferment, long retard and long after fridge rise bread. I really like the way it came out. Nice dark crispy, crunchy crust with Nijella and sesame seeds, soft, moist, small holed crumb with subtle SD taste that made great tasting toast too. It is still my favorite sandwich challah loaf .

The second shot of the crub says a lot about me and my foodie nature.  Home made; challah, dijon mustard, pickles, cheese, meat and home grown; lettuce and tomatoes.

The 3rd shot means it is home made Aranchello, Minneochello and Limochello time too !!!!!

Comments

FlourChild's picture
FlourChild

Love following your changes to your classic bread process.  Everything looks very, very good- lunch at your house must be a coveted invitation!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

another further refinement that is made in a 1930's Wagner Ware Magnalite Roaster that my Mother in Law used to make chicken in.  Works great as a cloche.  I will be posting that version later too.  People show up all the time knowing that they will get what ever we are eating next!!  They usually are surprised what it is but they don't complain too long or hard :-)  We invite the world but only a samll portion of it shows up for eats.  My MIL used to do sit down Thanksgiving for 67 adults, not counting their children, in her home dining and connected living room.  She was a pro though and we miss her much.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

is posted now.

Juergen Krauss's picture
Juergen Krauss

and the name of the bread my curiosity...

I suppose there is a story?

Juergen

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

How about Yiddish?  Broyn feld a sakh tvue broyt .  'Brownman's Multi Grain Bread' and yes there is a story that takes too long to tell at dinner time !!  But I will post it later - promise.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

in Brown man's many grain bread into the English to German online translator, it came up with Brachflachen Mehrere Vollkombrot.  But after your post, I plugged that into the German to English translator and it came back with Vacant Flat Multiple Vollkombrot.  I can see why you were so confused.  Now, when I type in Many Grain Soudough Bread it comes back with Viele Kom Saierfeigbrot.  I'm aftaid to put that into the German to English translator but here goes.... it came back with........

Many KOM Saier base bread.  I give up!!!  I'm sticking with Brachflachen Mehrere Vollkombrot  even if it means: many grain bread made in a vacant flat :-) Sorry for the confusion.  Do you know what Brachflachen Mehrere Vollkombrot really means?
Juergen Krauss's picture
Juergen Krauss

Yes, online translators can be quite cute...

In German the word Brachflaeche actually exists - it means something like wasteland or uncultivated land.

My first thought was you were living in one of the American deserts - I suppose with you living in Arizona my intuition wasn't too bad...

Mehrere Vollkornbrot - this doesn't quite work in German, the usual expression is Mehrkornbrot.

Juergen

By the way, Saier is a not uncommon last name in the German south-west.

varda's picture
varda

about the name.  (First of all your bread looks very nice.)    It doesn't seem to mean Brown' s multigrain bread (even in Yiddish) because you translated that otherwise.    And it accidentally means vacant bread in German.   But what was your naming intent in whatever language?    -Varda

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Maybe you can help me here.  I wanted to call it Brownman's Multi-grain Bread.  I plugged that into translator, but Multi isn't translatable to German and it came back with Multi and  Brownman's came back for Brownman's too. That sounded way to English for my German Jewish Heritage.  So I plugged in Brown mans many grain bread and the translator came back with  Brachflachen Mehrere Vollkombrot.  I though that translation sounded very German and so that is what I called it.  So, if I wanted to really call it Brownman's Multi-Grain Bread - what would that be in German?

varda's picture
varda

I know around 1oo words of Yiddish and less German.   I was just perplexed since when I typed in brachflachen I got "flat broke".   The key thing is the bread!  -Varda

Juergen Krauss's picture
Juergen Krauss

is not an easy thing to translate into German - as one word.

Using two words breaks the rhythm and poetry of the name.

In German you can easily chain nouns, like

Bundesstrassennummernschildpfosten, or Donauschifffahrtskapitänsmützenmessingknopfpoliertuch, if you want to do that, but Brownman - Braunmann - in the sense of brown man,  this doesn't really work. But maybe there are some German poets among us?

If Brownman is a proper name, then you could say Braunmann's Mehrkornbrot. Your version sounds a lot more exciting!

Jürgen

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

the name for it to be exciting!   Even though I'm pretty sure now, that it's not a vollkombrot in the least either.  Version 4 finally came out as I hoped it would, one day.  I posted it yesterday.  So much better than version 3.  But ....It could be better .  Maybe you could help me with that and point me in the right direction toward true Mehrkornbrot ?

Juergen Krauss's picture
Juergen Krauss

Hi,

Did you follow Karin's (hanseata) blog? She does a lot of excellent Vollkorn/Mehrkorn things. Also, there is Peter Reinhart's book "WholeGrain Breads" out there (I don't own it), very popular on TFL.

I have practically no experience with seeded breads - mainly doing 100% rye and rye/wheat mixes, with the occasional baguette, Sandwich loaf or Levain ...

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Did you see here seeded breads this week?  Unbelievable! I will pick her brain and blame you for it  :-) I am really trying very hard not to buy any more bread or cook books.....unless I am forced into doing so.