The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

BBC "The Great British Bake Off"

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rocketbike's picture
rocketbike

BBC "The Great British Bake Off"

The BBC is running a series at the moment called "The Great British Bake Off".  The presenters include Paul Hollywood (author of "100 Great Breads"), and last night's episode centred on bread-making.  The competition setting unfortunately didn't allow for slow-rise, so the focus was on straight doughs.


For those of you with a UK IP address or proxy, you can see the programme at:


http://bbc.co.uk/i/tndz9/


for the next seven days.


R

alabubba's picture
alabubba

Available on NNTP for those in the know.

Gary Turner's picture
Gary Turner

If you go to the digital end of the show you get Collingwoods Cobb recipe in which he uses 24 grams of active yeast for 500g of flour, seems excessive when most recipes for 500g flour suggest 10-15g of fresh reducing by a third for dry active  - just a thought


very disapointed in the show didn't get to see much all style no substance

rocketbike's picture
rocketbike

I'm afraid Hollywood's book is the same.  5 of the first 6 recipes listed combine 30g fresh yeast with as little as 500g flour.  Personally I'd use about a quarter of that!


Unfortunately the relative rarity of bread-related programming on UK TV leaves you grasping at straws...  even those lacking substance.


R.

Brian Haines's picture
Brian Haines

Hollywood's recipe is here, which might be viewable outside UK.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/paul_hollywoods_crusty_83536


I have tried it out today, sticking closely to the instructions, and it resulted in one of the worst loaves I've made for some time! All that yeast gave a very vigorous first rise, but it was probably too quick.


 


 

alabubba's picture
alabubba

Anyone know what brand of ovens they are using, I really like the retracting door design. If you don't know what I am talking about, When the oven door is fully open (down) it slides into a recess at the bottom of the oven. Completely out of the way. Brilliant!. No HOT oven door to burn yourself on, No HOT glass to drip water on when steaming.


Is it a UK only kind of thing, or are there similar things in the US?

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi alabubba,

Yes it's a UK thing. Our tiny island is full from coast to coast with ovens with slide away doors so that we never burn our pasty little fingers on the glass!

Actually I've never seen an oven like this in either a UK home kitchen or showroom. However a brief glimpse of the handle at the point where the oven cuts out for safety reasons and comes back on again shows it to be a Neff.

My guess is it would be the Neff with slide away door, as reviewed

here  

Neff appears to be a German firm that distributes widely in the UK but I'm not sure if these ovens are available in the US. Hope you can locate this or something similar.

Kind regards, Daisy_A

 

copyu's picture
copyu

even though I've lived in the USA, Australia and Asia.


However, the concept is not  really new...it's been used on hundreds of thousands of tool-boxes, whether made of steel or wood. In fact, it has been standard practice to make tool-boxes for machinists, mechanics and (the former) pattern-makers with lockable doors that slide away under the drawers and partitions...they usually stick out a few inches, however, as the door is somewhat wider than the depth of the tool-box. I could REALLY use a design such as that in my cramped Japanese kitchen and I wouldn't care if the door stuck out a little bit...I wonder—Are the oven designers reading these pages?


Cheers,


copyu


PS: Who's going to be first to suggest it to all the oven manufacturers? I hope they give you a few hundred bucks for the 'brilliant idea'! copyu   

rolls's picture
rolls

i watched this on youtube if anyones interested, i like to watch anything really involving bread and dough lol.