The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Hydration with whole grain additions

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ml's picture
ml

Hydration with whole grain additions

Hi all,

Does anyone know of an estimate for how much to increase dough hydration when you add whole grains? For example, if I want to change a formula from 25% WW to 40%?

Thanks

ML

jcking's picture
jcking

According to Hamelman's book it suggests that moving from a 11.5% to a 12.5% flour would require about 3% more water.


When subbing Whole Wheat for AP add 14g water for every 56.5 of flour. P. Reinhart

ml's picture
ml

So, is that 3% per amount of higher protein flour?

Help me through this :) 

If I have 700g TF @ 70% = 490g h2o. If I make 40% of that flour WW, I have 280g WW. A 3% increase on 280 is 14.7g h2o. A 3% inc. on 700=21.

If I add 14g h20 per 56.5g flour, I add 70g h2o. That would make dough 80%.

Doc.Dough's picture
Doc.Dough

I am sitting in the waiting room at the  car dealer so I don't have Hamelman at hand, but I suspect that the 3% would take you from 70% to 73% (if you were moving all of the flour from 11.5% protein to 12.5% protein).  If your white flour is at 11.5% and your WW is at 12.5%, and you are substituting WW for 40% of the white, then you might increase the water by 40% x 3% or 1.2% and you would be at 71.2% hydration.  If your WW is actually lower protein than your white flour, it would go the other direction.

I would be inclined to run a batch at 70% and see how it comes out, then make 1% hydration adjustments in whichever direction is indicated until it came out the way I wanted it.

jcking's picture
jcking

What are the protein levels of the flours you plan to use?

Jim

ml's picture
ml

AP about 11.7 & WW 12.5

jcking's picture
jcking

I would go with the 21g extra water. Then make adjustments for the next bake if need be.

Jim

ml's picture
ml

Jim,

Did you decide this based on the protein levels?

Thanks everyone, I will begin my new formula!

ML

jcking's picture
jcking

ML,

Yes, based on protein levels. Just remember not all proteins produce good gluten. Flours from different mills with the same protein levels can perform differently.

Jim