The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Lyle's Golden Syrup

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Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Lyle's Golden Syrup

A question about this product...

What exactly is it and what is it used for?  Bread baking or sweets?

Thanks,

Janet

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Janet,

Both Lyle's Golden Syrup and Black Treacle are hugely popular in the UK and have been around over 100 years.

Tate and Lyle are manufacturers of sugar from cane only.   The other main sugar producer in the UK, Silver Spoon from British Sugar is made from beet.

Golden Syrup is used in a variety of different ways.   It's popular drizzled into porridge and has a variety of uses in baking.   For instance it makes greatr flapjacks.   It has the hygroscopic advantage of all syrups.   But it is not as flavoursome as other syrups, although it is of course, very sweet!

Best wishes

Andy

ps. website is here, although it's not that informative to be honest:

http://www.lylesgoldensyrup.com/index.php

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Thanks for the response Andy,

I gather then it is merely a sugar syrup made from sugar cane???

I am wondering how it compares in flavor to honey or maple syrup or molasses....or is it more like karo syrup? 

Janet

 

alabubba's picture
alabubba


how it compares in flavor to honey or maple syrup or molasses....or is it more like karo syrup?

This is like asking what a bananna tastes like.

I grew up on the stuff (thanks mom) and it is one of those taste/memory triggers for me. It has a warm, buttery flavor unlike anything else. I have yet to find a source for it locally but am always on the lookout for it when i travel.

There is a whole foods in Little Rock, I will look for it next time i get round that way.

My favorite way of eating it... Toast, Waffles, Licking the back of a spoon :o) 

Allan

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Allan,

You are right about the question....how I forget taste is subjective....I went ahead and ordered a bottle from King Arthur so I will soon have first hand experience :-)

Janet

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

was much like a very light molasses (in U.S. terms).  Sweeter and not quite as "dark" in taste as Grandma's light or Br'er Rabbit Gold, for instance.

Paul

EvaB's picture
EvaB

in Canada the equivalent is Roger's Golden syrup, a thick delicious treat. My DH likes it on hot buttered biscuits right out of the oven, poured over the melted butter. This is great.

This was the syrup of choice of my mother, she wasn't really into corn syrup, and swapped out any recipe that asked for corn syrup with the golden.

I can't describe the taste, although the buttery comment is close. Its great drizzled on pancakes, its thicker than any maple syrup or pancake syrup and is sort of like very thin caramel oozing along the pancake.

My actual favourite syrup is chokecherry a thin pancake syrup made from my own pickings, my daughter loves this with breakfast sausages and pancakes.

PaddyL's picture
PaddyL

I can't, obviously, talk for TROC (The Rest Of Canada), but Lyle's is readily available in La belle province.

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Janet,

Yes it is a syrup made from cane.

It does not carry the flavour of the products you mention.   We don't have Karo Syrup in the UK to my knowledge, although it appears to be a corn syrup.   My guess is they will be quite similar in terms of relatively light flavours, but the Golden Syrup will probably be just a bit sweeter than the Corn Syrup.

You know, for years I always thought Lyle's Golden Syrup was a corn-base product too.   Then it dawned on me that it was part of the Tate & Lyle based empire, and so would be made from cane!

Andy

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Got it now. Thanks...sounds like it would go well with popcorn balls!  But I make those out of rice syrup and almond butter....a healthier twist.

I usually use agave nectar, fruit juices or honey as sweetener....they seem less processed but who really knows in the long run....

 I read about the Lyle's and it piqued my curiosity...thinking of adding it to my line up...always something new to try out.

Janet

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hi Janet,
Rose Levy Beranbaum refers to Lyle's Golden Syrup as 'refiner's syrup' in her book The Cake Bible.
Imho, Lyle's Golden Syrup tastes a lot better than regular corn syrup.
(Rose advises Lyle's Golden Syrup can be used interchangeably with light corn syrup; I've done so many times and have been very happy with the result).
:^) from breadsong

 

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Breadsong,

THanks for the tip from RB's book.  I don't use corn syrup - or haven't yet in my baking and was wondering if this will go with the holiday treats I am preparing to make...

I generally bake whole grain, sourdough breads....not sweets but am tempted this year...and this look intriguing.

Janet

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

It's very highly refined cane syrup. The viscosity is like molasses (perhaps not quite as thick) and it's intensely sweet, easily as sweet as corn syrup, perhaps more so. I use it to make caramels. You can buy it at Whole Foods here in Colorado (and expect to pay a small fortune for it).

Most cane syrups are not nearly as refined as Lyle's. I like the unrefined ones much more, like Steen's Cane Syrup.

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

I love Lyle's,  it is a wonderful syrup and I also use it in place of corn syrup.

I'll ask my SNL to bring me some of your suggested syrup back from his next trip to LA.  I'm sure he's heard of it.  The molasses also, sounds wonderful for my ginger bread cakes, too.  Reading the history about the LA cane, brings back my childhood memories of buying sugar canes for a nickel or dime and chewing on them.

Sylvia

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

You can order Steen's directly from their website.

Their order form looks rather ancient, but they ship quickly.

Try it with buttermilk biscuits.

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Hi Sylvia,

So in what type of recipes do you use Lyles???  I generally don't bake 'sweet', exceptions are being made this holiday season, so any ideas are welcome :-) 

Janet

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

sweet and savory, beans, ect.  I replace any recipe that calls for karo or corn syrup with Lyles.

Sylvia   

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Sylvia,

Thanks for the ideas...

Janet

merlie's picture
merlie

Wonderful syrup with a flavour unlike any other - available here in British Columbia at my local supermarket @ $3.99 for 250ml. But when they run out it seems to take months before they get more.   Whenever I go back to England I bring back a large can of it ! I'm suprised nobody has mentioned making syrup tart - Tartshell , syrup and enough bread crumbs to to soak up the syrup. A few decorative pastry strips accross the top and baked at 400 degrees for 25 minutes. Lovely sliced  cold. (  or warm with custard ! )

Merlie

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Whole Foods is a weekly event for me....do you know what they charge compared to what KA charges?  (They charge 8.00 for 11 ounces.)  I have an order for KA and if their price is less I will go with it; otherwise it will be added to my weekly grocery list...

Thanks,

Janet

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

...since I bought any, but it was about $6.00 for a tiny jar (maybe 11 ounces?). 

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Janet,

I guess this shows the costs of importing!

I just checked Sainsbury's online.   A 454g tin costs 68p, on special offer just now.   Ordinarily, the retail price is 85p.

I am quite shocked, for a number of reasons.   Hold on to those teeth now!

Best wishes

Andy

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Andy,

I have no idea what your prices are compared to US.....I play a game with my kids called Catch-A-Penny and it is British and uses pence, shillings and crowns but I have no idea how those amts. compare with US denominations....I don't travel much *^)

Janet

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Janet

1 dollar = 0.64 british pounds.

So you could say that the tin of Golden Syrup I highlighted above cost just over 1 dollar equivalent...and it weighs 1 imperial pound!

I reckon you are paying between 10 and 12 dollars for the same imperial pound in the US!

As I said, wow!

BW

Andy

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Andy,

Amazing....postage sure adds up!  :-)

Wonder who gets all the extra money???

Janet

 

Jean6's picture
Jean6

You do not need to import such syrup. There is an American brand: Steen's 100% Pure Cane Syrup: http://www.steensyrup.com/

It is a good alternative to table syrups that contain high fructose corn syrup, but it does have its own flavor.

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

Hi Jean,

I too love Steen's syrup, but it's nothing like Lyle's Golden Syrup, which is a very highly refined cane syrup.

Lyle's is golden-coloured and very thick; Steen's is molasses-coloured and not as thick.

They taste nothing like each other.

Steen's tastes like cane syrup, Lyle's does not. It tastes more like corn syrup. If you didn't know Lyle's was made of cane, you wouldn't believe it.

 

Steen's would likely fall somewhere between Lyle's Golden and Lyle's Treacle:

 

Thomas

PaddyL's picture
PaddyL

They sell it in tins in Ireland, but the homemade steamed pudding with Lyles' Golden Syrup is heavenly!  I'm going to use a tablespoon or two in the sticky buns I'll be making on Wednesday.

pjaj's picture
pjaj

There are several classic puddings, popular in the UK both in the home and restaurants, that have Golden Syrup as one of their main ingredients. Typically:-

Sticky Toffee Pudding

Steamed golden syrup sponge pudding

Treacle Tart

All the above links are to the BBC web site where there are also several variations of each, but you will find lots of other recipes for similar dishes on UK sites. Whilst the last one is called Treacle (Molasses) Tart and can be made with dark treacle, it is more frequently made with the light coloured syrup in my experience.