The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Sweet Potato Rolls

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Floydm's picture
Floydm

Sweet Potato Rolls

I made this recipe up last night. We thought they were great, so I think I'll make them again for Thanksgiving.

The sweet potatoes give the rolls a beautiful orange color. They also give off a nice earthy smell. You don't taste them very much, though they do keep the rolls soft and supple.

I made mine too large, more like hamburger buns than rolls. Next time I'll divide the dough into smaller pieces.

Sweet Potato Rolls
makes 12 to 18 rolls

1 sweet potato, baked
1 cup milk
1/2 cup white or brown sugar
3-4 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons instant yeast
2 teaspoons salt
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg

Bake the sweet potato for approximately 45 minutes at 375. Remove the oven and let cool.

Combine the sweet potato, sugar, and milk and stir to make a paste. Mix in 2 cups of the flour, the salt, the yeast, and the spices until thoroughly combined. Add more flour a quarter cup at a time. Mix in after each addition until you have a dough that is tacky but which you can handle with wet hands. When you hit the proper consistency, remove from the bowl and knead by hand for 5 to 10 minutes.

Set the dough aside to rise in a covered bowl for 45 minutes to an hour. Divide into a dozen or so pieces, shape, and then again allow to rise until they have roughly doubled in size, another hour or so.

I suspect they would be lovely if coated with an egg wash. I did not do so, but I may next time.

sweet potato rolls

Bake at 375 for approximately 20 to 25 minutes until they are beginning to turn brown.

sweet potato rolls

sweet potato rolls

maggie664's picture
maggie664

Hello Floyd,
Those rolls look wonderful. Is your sweet potato what we call here kumara - has it got bright pumpkin-coloured flesh and yellow/grey skin? M

Floydm's picture
Floydm
slidething's picture
slidething

 Floyd ~

  Hmmmm - yummy looking rolls ~ get the skillet hot and grill them with alittle brown sugar and cimmamon.... a cup of coffee and call it breakfast.

 Or roll the bulk dough out and and spread butter over it - give it a book-fold then two three folds and let it rest about 30 minutes and roll out and make cinnamon bunns.

 Either way awsome rolls ~

 Slide_Out

KipperCat's picture
KipperCat

I can't make these beautiful dinner rolls for Thanksgiving dinner as my hostess is allergic. But I can make sweet potato cinnamon rolls with pecans for Christmas morning! I think I could make the dough and shape the rolls ahead of time and freeze - then move to refrigerator on Christmas Eve and bake in the morning. Do you think I should let them rise any before freezing?

Manang's picture
Manang

Shape your log (with the cinnamon filling) and wrap tight with cling wrap before freezing.


On the day you are going to bake, thaw on the countertop for 15 minutes, then slice with a knife. Dip in/brush with melted butter and place on your baking pan. Let rise in warmed oven (just so it is draft-free and the warmth will help in rising; I usually turn the oven on for 1 minute then turn it off for this purpose). Rising will probably be anywhere from 1 hr to 2 hrs.  Some people let them rise in room temp which takes forever, I can imagine, but  it will be easy enough to place in the fridge to "stop" the rising if you are not yet ready to put in the oven.


I recently made sweet potato cinnamon rolls and they are heavenly!

Doc Tracy's picture
Doc Tracy

This sounds amazing! Did you put butter in your cinnamon filling?

browndog's picture
browndog

The gold just leaps off the screen, gorgeous.

pandedulce's picture
pandedulce

Definitely making these for thanksgiving!!!

Happy Thanksgiving Everyone!!!

 

When in doubt trust your stomach!

breadnerd's picture
breadnerd

What a lovely color, I never thought of using sweet potato in a potato-type bread, what a good idea!  May just add that to my t-day menu :)

maggie664's picture
maggie664

Floyd, Thank you for the info re kumara which was extremely interesting. M

zolablue's picture
zolablue

Those rolls look and sound so good - beautiful color!  What are your thoughts about keeping quality? 

 

I'm in kind of an odd spot because my sister wants me to bring rolls for our TD there on Friday after having been gone all day on Thursday at my in-laws house.  The latest I could bake them would be Wednesday night.  

 

Should I bake, cool and freeze?  Or would they be ok to last for 2 days in a plastic bag? 

 

(PS...Floyd, I can't click on the stars anymore because they just jump around. Is it just me?)

Floydm's picture
Floydm

I baked them on Saturday evening. We had some for breakfast this morning (Monday) and they were fine. I would assume that if you stored them tightly in plastic and then maybe zapped them in the microwave for thirty seconds before serving them they'd be good as new.

I need to look at why the stars are misbehaving in IE, I just haven't gotten around to it.

zolablue's picture
zolablue

Floyd, do you have any thoughts on how this dough would retard overnight? 

Floydm's picture
Floydm

I think it'd be fine, but I can't say that I've tried it. I think I'm going to bake them tomorrow. My goal is to have them risen and ready to go into the oven the minute the turkey comes out. They only take about 20 minutes to bake and it takes at least 10 or 15 to get the turkey out, transferred to a plate, carved, and so on.

Good luck!

zolablue's picture
zolablue

I found I will have more time here tomorrow than I thought so I may just bake them in the morning for Friday's dinner.  I might even try to retard the shaped rolls overnight - oh, heck, who am I kidding - I can't decide!  It is hard to figure out these things when there isn't enough time at home in between having to run to two family's out-of-town houses for dinner.

 

I can't wait to make these pretty orange rolls so thanks for the recipe.  If they aren't any good I'll hunt you down.  (lol)  Have a happy turkey day!

spsq's picture
spsq

I love this site.  I'm a little embarassed to admit that sometimes when I see some of these pictures - like those gorgeous golden rolls - I get a little teary.  So beautiful!

zolablue's picture
zolablue

I did get these made but I must have lost count of the flour as I was adding it; ok I DID lose count of the flour while adding it.  So I ended up with much lighter colored rolls than your beautiful orange ones.  Still they were lovely and I snipped some little points into the tops and they really looked festive.

 

Everyone loved them especially a couple people that insisted on taking any that were left - I'd made a double batch.  I loved the flavor and would definately make them again only I would keep track of the amount of flour.  (hehe) 

 

Floyd, I imagine your dough was much more sticky than I let mine be.  I didn't have time to let them rise the morning I mixed them up so I put them in the fridge to retard all day.  They had only risen a teensy half inch many hours later.  When I removed them from the fridge I realized that they were rising SO slowly I would be up the entire night so I went to bed around 1:00 am.  I woke up at 6:30 am to find they had gone over double about a half inch but I was fine with that as I thought they were never going to raise at all.  Is that because I obviously dumped in way too much flour for the yeast amount?

 

Anyway, whatever I did I made them slow and I was not sure if you intended they needed to double in bulk.  I think my confusion caused me much extra time and work but that's a newbie mistake.  At any rate they were really nice rolls and I hope the next time I make them I can make them the color of yours. 

Floydm's picture
Floydm

The color may have also been because there are different color sweet potatoes. I think I was using red garnet sweet potatoes, which are one of the most colorful.

My first rise with them was really slow too. After 90 minutes or so it hadn't come anywhere close to doubling. But after I divided and shaped them they rose fairly quickly. My best guess is that this was because the milk and sweet potato were cold. Only after being out of the fridge for a while and in the palm of my hand did the dough warm up enough to rise quickly.

No worries about the mistakes. If your guests enjoyed them that is what is important. You might find tricks that make them work better anyway. If you do, please let us know!

ehanner's picture
ehanner

I didn't get around to these before Turkey Day so I thought a rainy cold Monday would be a good excuse for fresh rolls with the soup on the stove, simmering the essence out of the turkey carcase. I won't bother with the pictures, they look exactly like Floyd's.

I happened to have a ruby red sweet potato which are very brightly colored and sweet compared to others. I think these would be good with canned pumpkin as well and as Floyd mentioned you don't really taste the sweet potato. I did make one minor change in the direction of enhancing the flavor. I used dark brown sugar in place of what I took to be white sugar in the recipe. I always use dark brown in pumpkin pies also and it adds a depth of flavor to the sweetness that I like.

In the end I used nearly 4 Cups of flour to get the consistency that just barely let me shape the rolls on a floured counter into mini boules. I know the recipe calls for using wet hands but I had better luck with a dry process. I've been learning to handle wet dough with hands in my rye and WW breads but small round shapes would be a stretch for me.

The only advice I have if you are considering this recipe is, make a double batch!

Thanks Floyd this is a keeper!

Eric

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Glad to hear they worked out.

umbreadman's picture
umbreadman

I made these as well a few days ago for my parents, and like eric, i used brown instead of white sugar, and I think it was a great substitution. They turned out really well. My dad, ever the adventurous one, suggested putting a date in the middle of the rolls before baking them, so i tried it with one. I'm usually a little hesitant to take my dad's suggestions because they're generally a bit far out, but the date in the center melted a little bit and was a great addition without making it too sweet. I'm tempted to try and use dates, chopped up, to sweeten a bread in the future.

Cyrus 

Floydm's picture
Floydm

That sounds pretty neat.

I updated the recipe to say "white or brown sugar" since it sounds like you and Eric both had good success with that. It does sound good.

Hmm... what about with marshmallows melted on top?

=8^P

umbreadman's picture
umbreadman

you know, somebody (i forget who...sadly) made little rolls with melted chocolate faces on them. i think if we fused that idea with what we've got going here...sweet potato & brown sugar rolls with chocolate and marshmallow faces...with something in the center...maybe that's going too far....

 

 

but maybe not......(insert mysterious music)

KipperCat's picture
KipperCat

I have a bag of date sugar, which I think is just ground up dates. It has a nice flavor, sort of like brown sugar, but maybe a bit deeper - if that makes any sense!  The date in the middle sounds like a nice touch.

zolablue's picture
zolablue

The brown sugar sounds great and the date is a super idea, too!  I even think making this bread in a tiny loaf pan would be nice and then you could slice a nice "roll size" piece.  That might be another good way to use the dates.  Or you could roll it out like sweet rolls and make your own date filling using muscavado sugar and it would mimic sticky toffee pudding; as in sticky toffee pudding bread.  YUM!

 

I'm envious because I did use a more colorful sweet potato although I didn't pay attention to the name if they noted it.  I was doing something kinda risky using two odd measuring cups because I had the other ones dirty from having just made pumpkin ice cream so I was trying to keep count with odd numbers.  My mind must have wandered.  Naw, ya think!  (hehe)  Anyway, I am sure going to make them again maybe even this weekend to take to my parents because my mother hasn't quit talking about how good they were and my father had wanted to snatch some of the leftovers but was beaten by the others.  I can't stop until I make it properly.

 

Oh, I wanted to ask Eric and umbreadman, did you notice a long time for the dough to rise?

JinMaine's picture
JinMaine

I couldn't help responding to this since I was convinced I had forgotten the yeast from my sweet potato rolls on Thanksgiving. The bulk dough had very little rise - even after several hours. I finally decided that I would shape the rolls anyway and cast fate to the wind - no one would need to know that I baked rolls for dinner. Once shaped, I put them in a pretty warm (but off) oven and they rose a little. Stuck them in the oven and - what a spring they had!

They were the hit of Thanksgiving dinner and, to put a stop to whining, I ended up packing all the leftover rolls (not many) for the guests to take home.

This was a keeper recipe and thanks to Floyd for the pretty picture!

Janet

 

 

zolablue's picture
zolablue

I'm so glad it wasn't just me. Since I was a little confused to begin with on the flour I was still going over and over in my mind hours later in bed that night (sad, huh) if I had truly added the proper amount of yeast. I know I did. So this, for some reason I don't understand, just doesn't want or need to rise very much in bulk. I wish I'd had the guts to just shape the rolls like you guys did. I also got a bit more dense crumb than Floyd's photo showed so no doubt that was due to my rise time and the extra flour, of course.

 

umbreadman's picture
umbreadman

Have faith in the little guys! I don't know why it doesn't rise a whole lot as a dough, but the oven heat kicks it into high gear and takes care of everything. I feel like the dough was wetter/slacker than usual doughs, and that threw me off a little bit. I dusted them with flour at the end to make them easier to handle, but was hesitant to add much more to the dough than called for.

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Hey there Zolablue, I'm feeling smug about the rising issue. A couple weeks ago I ordered a 1# package of SAF-Gold Instant yeast from KA. Yeast is inexpensive and I wanted to try it out in acidic and sweet doughs. So I have been using the Gold for anything with a preferment or any sugar. I don't really have a way to judge the Red and Gold against each other as I use it. I suppose I could do an independent side by side test of both yeasts but hey I trust SAF when they say Osmotolerant works best with sweet and acid mixes.

So to answer your question, my dough didn't appear slow and I made a point to be careful about the temperature (75F) after the final kneading.

As I was pushing this soft dough around I had the idea that next time I will use 50% of the ap flour and make up the balance with first clear. My hope is to develop the gluten a little better with the stronger clear.

Hope this helps.

Eric

tananaBrian's picture
tananaBrian

I have a confession to make ...I gave in to lust today.  I just sent for a pound each of SAF red and SAF gold, sigh.  My wife will complain that Sam's Club has instant yeast cheaper, but hey, I work too!  Since she's a strong supporter of whatever comes out of the oven, made by me, I don't think she'll complain too much... heh heh


Brian


 

zolablue's picture
zolablue

I remember you discussing that yeast on a thread a while back.  Good to know it works for sweet doughs.  I only have the SAF regular instant and didn't realize the gold could make such a difference.  Still, it is good to hear that others were able to bake these rolls without having to rise to double.  I have to put in another order with KA so maybe I'll give the gold a try.  Thanks!

okieinalaska's picture
okieinalaska

Those look great! I will have to give them a try. I love sweet potatos! We even put them in our whole grain pancakes (just a mix) with a little bit of pumpkin pie spice, my kids can't get enough.

 

Amy in Alaska

Ruth Redburn's picture
Ruth Redburn

                Ruth Redburn

 Absolutely wonderful!  I made these after Thanksgiving with just a small sweet potato.  What size did most of you use?  I will definitely make these for Christmas making a double recipe since there will be many of us.  My husband loved them also.  I plan to share this recipe with a friend who is as mad as I am for this healthy, delicious vegie. 

jkm's picture
jkm

I cooked the S potaoto  in the microwave,and put the potaoto, sugar, milk  in the food processor! then I added the flour and it developed the gluten very nicely, a quick knead and it shaped and rose nicely.

Much better flavor than plain rolls. Next time I plan to add an egg, or a bit of oil to make the dough more supple. Is the lack of oil deliberate?

 

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Not at all. A little oil or butter or an egg would be fine in them and make them slightly richer.

The second time I baked them I threw in a couple of tablespoons of butter. It didn't make a big difference, though they probably would have kept longer. That wasn't a problem though: we ate them all while they were still warm.

lisalisa's picture
lisalisa

Hi, I'm new here.  Pretty new to baking breads as well.  This is probably a stupid question.  I'm going to try these sweet potato rolls tomorrow, and I was wondering, after I bake the potato, do I peel it?  Or do I just put it in the food processor, skin and all?

 Thanks so much for any help!

sphealey's picture
sphealey

=== 'm going to try these sweet potato rolls tomorrow, and I was wondering, after I bake the potato, do I peel it? Or do I just put it in the food processor, skin and all? ===

If your receipe includes thorough mixing or kneading, then you can include the skin or not at your option. In our family we tend to eat potatos skin and all, so I go ahead and put the peel in the dough too (cut and mashed). I do go over the potato carefully before cooking and cut out any eyes, green spots, soft spots, etc.

The potato skin adds nice flecks to bagels in particular.

Not as many people eat sweet potato skins though, and if your family does not then you might try the recipe without the skin first. 

sPh

gaaarp's picture
gaaarp

Sweet potato skins tend to get quite leathery when baked.  If you include them, you're likely to have chewy flecks of brown skin in your rolls.  I would definitely peel it.

lisalisa's picture
lisalisa

Thank you both.  I think I'll pass on the skins; its not something we're accustomed to eating anyway.  I'll post tomorrow & let everyone know how they turned out.

 Thanks again.

ehanner's picture
ehanner

I made these last year for Turkey Day and they were a big hit. Great flavor that's a little unusual.

Eric 

tomr's picture
tomr

I made these yesterday and baked them for 15 min (not 45 min). When they came out, I brushed them w/ butter.  They were great! I'd definitely make them again.  This morning, I split one and toasted it like you would an English muffin.  That works too!


Thanks,


Tom

johnedwin's picture
johnedwin

The sweet potato in the dough gives the rolls a nice soft texture, and the currants give a bit of sweetness to the rolls.Don't let the yeast scare you. These rolls are really quite easy to make, even if your not that comfortable making yeast doughs.


--------------------------


john edwin

Magrat's picture
Magrat

I made these rolls yesterday and they are awesome! Thanks for sharing the recipe.  Next time I want to use yams, they will make a beautiful coloured roll!

Sarabiner's picture
Sarabiner

Great recipe! Pure and simple...   The look great and taste even better! I'm definately making a giant batch for Christmas dinner! Thanks!

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I think they were purple sweet potato buns.  Very colorful.  They looked more steamed than baked. 


I wonder what they would look like if an outside layer of yellow sweet potato bun dough was wrapped around a purple centered dough.  Could be interesting.  Or even two different colored batches of yellow sweet potato buns, marbled or rolled up together.  hmmm


Mini O


edit... I just found purple sweet potato flour.... in my local asian market.

ladyloree's picture
ladyloree

The Rolls you have posted I will try to make for Sunday dinner. I am new to this site and have baked a couple of loaves with some sucess.  I have a question for you Floyd the yeast can I use Quick Rise and  do I activiate it with what temp water before i put it in the mix.

Floydm's picture
Floydm

According to the Red Star Yeast website, " For traditional baking, QUICK·RISE™ Yeast can be mixed with dry ingredients."   So it sounds like instant yeast, which you don't need to activate it first. 


I would probably mix the yeast in with my dry ingredients, but zap the milk in the microwave for a minute before stirring it in.  Taking the chill off the milk first will help the yeast get going quickly.


Good luck!

ladyloree's picture
ladyloree

Thanks for your help. I will try it on Sunday.

alibali's picture
alibali

I've made 3 breads off this site and so far, this recipe is the most delicious and satisfying one.  I ate almost the entire batch.  Thank you.

ques2008's picture
ques2008

Great-looking rolls, Floyd.  Tell me, did the sweet potato keep the bread soft for 2-3 days?  They say using potatoes softens bread up until the 3rd or 4th day.

dstroy's picture
dstroy

I don't think we ever had enough left over for 3 days to answer - the kids absolutely LOVE these rolls and the longest we've ever had any left was the next day when they gobbled up any of the rolls that they hadn't had room for during the previous night's dinner.

Manang's picture
Manang

Here's a shorter way (and I think more economical way) to cook the sweet potato using the microwave:


Dip a sheet of paper towel in water to use for wrapping the sweet potato. Next, wrap this tightly with microwaveable cling wrap. Wrap a second time with cling wrap. Place in your microwave and choose the pad for potato.  If your microwave is not pre-set for specific cooking times, microwave for about 5 minutes and check doneness with toothpick. Microwave some more if not yet cooked.


Done this way, your sweet potato will stay moist and get really cooked without drowning in water.

hannahbanana's picture
hannahbanana

These rolls look great! I would like to make them with a portion of whole wheat flour. How much whole wheat flour could I substitute for white without making the rolls bland? Also, what other changes would I have to make to the recipe if I do use whole wheat flour. Thank you!

devil's picture
devil

i've try to do this before, but with different cooking method.i steam it.

Nancyjh's picture
Nancyjh

Floyd, I am very new at baking but thought your rolls looked fabulous so I am going to try them out on Thanksgiving day.  I did not get a feel for the size of the potato and/or if that even matters.  Also, did you pack your brown sugar or measure it out loosely?   Thanks,  Nancy

Floydm's picture
Floydm

"Average sized" and no, I didn't pack the sugar.

Nancyjh's picture
Nancyjh

Thanks!

JeannieTay's picture
JeannieTay

Hi Floyd, I have just stumbled into this forum and this recipe sounds interesting. I would like to try making these rolls but am not sure about the weight of the sweet potato required.  Please help. Thanks in advance.

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

they are soooo good.  I baked them in the muffin pan, recipe makes about 18 medium-size ones. I did the egg wash and baked them alongside a container of steamy water. Wonderful !


Thank you for sharing, Floyd.

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

King Arthur has a sweet potato bun recipe which calls for 1 medium sweet potato equaling 3/4 cup cooked, mashed sweet potato, which I weighed out to be 6.5 oz.

JeannieTay's picture
JeannieTay

I did this recipe the first time using 300g of the mashed sweet potato and the 2nd time I reduced to 200g, which yields bigger crumbs. Both are chewy and soft. I love it! Kinda difficult to handle the dough because it's really quite wet.


hullaf's picture
hullaf

I used up some leftover pumpkin squash (from the can) for a similar recipe and they've turned out just as good.


Orange of course.  pumpkin squash rolls   


(the buns at the top are Wild Yeast's hamburger buns - good as ever too!)

Janknitz's picture
Janknitz

I'm sitting here at work drooling on the keyboard.  I shouldn't be Fresh Loafing on the job!


Must


Try


Cinnamon


Sweet Potato


Rolls.


AAAAGGGGGHHHH!!!!!!!!!!!!!

droidman's picture
droidman

Followed recipe precisely, except substituted 1/4 cup regular honey and t tbsp buckwheat honey for the sugar. Love the edge that the spices give. Will be making these for Thanksgiving. Thanks, Floydm. I think you are the king of rolls.

scotsch's picture
scotsch

I'd like to make these for Thanksgiving, but I seem to be missing some information. I searched the thread and did't see the answers to the following.


I'm pretty new at breads, so please pardon me this is common sort of knowlegge to the group. 



  1. How hot an oven did you bake these in?

  2. Approximately how long did you bake them for

  3. with or without steam


Thanks!!


Scott


 

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Bake at 375 for approximately 20 to 25 minutes until they are beginning to turn brown.


I used an egg wash and no steam.

Precious's picture
Precious

Hi Floydm, I am new to baking bread, too. So.. my question: what is steam and no stream to mean? Many thanks!

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Here is a good info about about adding steam to your oven when baking.  It can be a very helpful technique, but use caution to protect both yourself and your oven.


-Floyd

Amori's picture
Amori

I finaly got a chance to try these =-) Used what I had on hand:  I med Yam, 3T butter, brown sugar, 1 egg, as for the spice I used pumpkin spice[1/2 ts]  and very little cinnamon [less than 1/4ts avail :-( ] along w/1 C white wheat flour+2.5 C AP. Convection setting  was being used, so they were baked at 355F for 12 minutes. Def a keeper, [will try the sweet potato next!] thanks for posting!


 

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

"... [will try the sweet potato next!] ..."


Don't worry. You already did.

Amori's picture
Amori

You are right! I fell into the crowd's opinion and whole foods tag: 'Garnet Yam' when in reality they are Sweet potatoes LOL


BTW, just ate one w/cream cheese this morning, still tender, and so good!

audra36274's picture
audra36274

   The color is wonderful. Had planned on my Parkerhouse, but after seeing these I am adding them to the lineup. Enjoy your Holidays!


   Audra

caseymcm's picture
caseymcm

I made a triple batch of 54 rolls (55-60 g each) to take to work for a thanksgiving potluck.  I used small sweet potatos, coated in oil before baking for 30 min.  They weren't too leathery this way; cut them, squeezed out the insides and finely minced the skins to include since there is a lot of nutrition in the skin, they barely affected the taste.


I used 100 g brown sugar and they were a little sweeter than desired, when I make them for thanksgiving with the family, I think I'll cut that down a bit.


I ended up adding very little extra flour beyond the 3 C initial because the dough felt like the right density even though it was pretty sticky.  With wet hands it was fine to handle.


Bulk rise at room temp was more than 2 hours and it was less than 1.5X, I even warmed up the milk to room and the potatoes were still slightly warm from the oven.  The yeast was SAF red, only a few months old and kept in the freezer.  At that point I had to go to bed so I stuck the dough in the fridge overnight.  By morning it was more than 3X of original!  After warming to room for 90 min they were tricky to shape being so sticky, but I managed to palm roll them without having to add much flour.  Egg wash gave them a nice shine.


Final rise was less than an hour and wasn't visably impressive.  They sprung a bit in the oven and were OK, but not as fluffy as I had hoped.  Great flavor though!  I figure I need to let them proof longer or use more yeast?  I've been meaning to order some SAF gold to try for things like this.

Larry Clark's picture
Larry Clark

If I cut the dough into 12 equal pieces, will it be too much dough for baking the rolls in a muffin pan?

Floydm's picture
Floydm

I think it'll work about right.  Give it a shot!

HUGO's picture
HUGO

Floyd your sweet potato rolls are WORLD CLASS.   I relize this recipe has been hanging about for a long time.  However I've made them for various functions and they brought rave reviews above and beyond the prime dish of the affair.  GREAT ROLLS AND THANKYOU FOR POSTING THE RECIPE.

KansasGirlStuckInMaryland's picture
KansasGirlStuck...

I made a test batch of these before Thanksgiving as I was looking for something new to take as my contribution to Thanksgiving at my friends.  These rolls are AWESOME!  I have been using 4+ cups of flour, but I think that is because the only sweet potatoes I could find were enormous.  The first batch was a little dense, but the flavor was A+.  I used dark brown sugar.  Well that first batch barely saw light of day they were so good.  I gave the batch for today a longer second rise and they are definitely lighter in texture.  I had to have one this morning for breakfast to make sure it was a good baking didn't I?

tananaBrian's picture
tananaBrian

We made these yesterday for our Thanksgiving dinner ...Yum!  I baked the yam (a "red yam") for an hour since it wasn't done at 45 minutes, then I ran it through my KA fruit and vegetable strainer.  We used white sugar in our since my experience is that white sugar produces lighter result.  I have another roll recipe that rises overnight and has you boil the white sugar in water for 5 minutes before using it (with the water of course) in the recipe, then the rolls get an overnight rise.


You can bake the yam (or sweet potato) the day before if you're going to have a crowded schedule in the kitchen like we usually do.  And for whatever reason, our try with this recipe rose slower than predicted ...but rise it did.  1-3/4 hours on the first rise, then 2-1/4 hours for the second, then 23 minutes at 375 in our oven did the trick.  The resulting rolls were just like in the picture ...light and airy for a bread that has a pile of sweet potatos in it.  Everyone loved them!


Brian


 

KansasGirlStuckInMaryland's picture
KansasGirlStuck...

Some of the homeless citizens of Howard County in Maryland, where I live, had these tonght as part of their dinner.  Truly a success.


A partnership with a local homeless shelter, some of the local churches and the Howard County government was formed several years ago to house the additional homeless people seeking shelter as the weather become colder.  Several of the area churches volunteer to provide food and shelter for the overflow of homeless that the homeless shelter does not have room for in their facility.  This week my church is hosting.  I prepared dinner for tonight, Farmer's Casserole (black forest ham, hash brown potatoes, eggs, milk, cheese and onion), broccoli, dump cake and a double batch of sweet potato rolls.  I was told repeatedly that I was welcome to provide those rolls every night this week and that I should pass the recipe on to the next church.  That reaction makes my aching back, knees and feet seem like a blessing.


 

Floydm's picture
Floydm

That's neat.   Glad to hear they were a hit and that it was a rewarding experience.

droidman's picture
droidman

I downsized the sugars (1/8 cup honey) and upped the salt about a half teaspoon, tastes not tending toward the sweet in my household. Stuck with 3-1/2 cups of flour and fought with the wet dough, but it was worth it. My sister-in-law asked for the recipe, which is the best compliment of all.


The leftovers worked really well with some habanero jelly.

droidman's picture
droidman

Used a large garnet yam, peeled and steamed, which turned out to be an excellent choice.

bakerknot's picture
bakerknot

 


I love this site. Novice baker here, getting ready to try my hand at these delectable-looking rolls soon. After reading the recipe and all the comments, especially those regarding slow first rise, my decidedly uneducated opinion is that the slowness of the first rise may be due to the temperature of the potato/sugar/milk paste to which the  flour/yeast/spices are added.  Shall I try out my theory on everyone?


An old Pillsbury Bake-off booklet notes that when yeast is mixed with dry ingredients, to which the liquid is then added, the liquid should be 120 F (not the 105-115 range suitable when yeast is mixed directly with liquid).  Thus, it appears to me that the buffering of dry ingredients alone reduces the heat of warm liquid the yeast needs to do its thing best.  


As written, this recipe has two such bufferings where needed heat can be lost: the warm liquid is absorbed into the paste (buffer 1); the yeast is in the dry ingredients (buffer 2). I'm thinking that not only do you need to zap the milk as Floyd suggests in one comment, but need to make sure the whole potato/sugar/milk paste is warm enough to make the yeast real happy when it goes in.  I doubt you'd want the whole paste to be 120F because the potato would hold heat longer than just milk would, and might keep dough too warm. (?)  But at least be sure the temp of the paste is warm. 


Alternatively, slightly change the order in which ingredients are combined.  Stir up the potato (which is at least room temp) with the sugar and set aside. Warm the milk to 120F and add it to the first 2 cups of dry ingredients containing the yeast, so the yeast gets first shot at that lovely warmth.  Then stir in the potato/sugar paste. Then start working in more flour. Would that work, or just make a glommy mess?


Obviously, this is all "head stuff" -- I'm really really new at baking.  But it stands to reason to me that if the yeast needs a certain degree of warmth, and the milk is mixed with the potato & sugar, then all of that needs to be warm when mixed in with the yeast. If you baked the potato immediately before and it hasn't cooled to cold, your paste is going to be warmer than if you baked the potato the night before and threw it in the fridge for continuing recipe next day. I'm just thinking.:-)


Total theory and I could be full o' beans! LOL. Did I mention how much of a novice baker I am?  If anyone can tell me why my rationale is off-base, or why  slightly changing how ingredients get mixed wouldn't work, I'd appreciate it.  Otherwise, I think I'll try changing how the ingredients come together -- to try to assure the yeast gets a nice warm milk bath. Then see what happens with the first rise. (and hope I don't screw up what is already a successful recipe)


The rolls have clearly turned out well regardless, so it's merely the first rise which might be amenable to some hastening with more upfront warmth. Given enough time, the yeast seems to have done its thing for everyone.  Looking forward to making these, but even more to eating them. Thanks for the recipe, Floyd.


 

tananaBrian's picture
tananaBrian

Hey BakerKnot,  That's some good solid thinking!  I made these rolls and everyone loved them.  I think that a combination of using your approach to temperature management combined with (Floyd's?) advice in using the SAF Gold yeast (osmo-something tolerant, for sweet or acidic doughs) would likely cure all rise time issues.  I'll make these again sometime before winter is out and will find out.  In the mean time, if YOU make them ...then please share your experiences with us here!


Brian


 

pastrychik's picture
pastrychik

I caught sweet potatoes on sale for $.39 lb and they were huge so I knew I could finally make this. My first batch were huge and dense but still really, really good and I left them out overnight and they are still soft. Today I made a double batch so I could do a few pans of dinner rolls and cinnamon rolls. The rolls are looking really good and on their way in the oven. I should have chilled my log before I cut it into pieces but I was soooo anxious. I have some in the freezer so I will try again for picture purposes.


Thanks so much for sharing this recipe. I love regular potato bread and this is even better. These rolls will become my sidekick to a nice hot bowl of roasted red pepper and corn chowder soon.


Chrissi

evastanger's picture
evastanger

I plan on baking sweet potato rolls for Thanksgiving, but for now I used regular russet potatoes.  I left out the sugar and spices, but I addedn chopped fresh rosemary instead.  Here are the results:Potato Rolls

pbrox's picture
pbrox

 Hi.


These look great, but I'm wondering about the quantity of sweet potato.  I like to weigh everything out.. but I'm stumped by this one.  My store carries sweet potatoes that are anywhere from 3 ounces to 2 pound giants..


Any thoughts on a measurement for these?  8 ounces?


Thanks for any thoughts.


Perry

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

Yes, an 8 oz raw sweet potato seems about right. Maybe a tad larger. About 7 oz - 7.25 oz(200 g, 1 US cup) of baked mashed sweet potato was mentioned to work well for one poster.


I did a similar King Arthur recipe and used 6.5 oz(baked, mashed) which worked well. The rolls will probably begin getting a little heavy if much more than 7.5 oz are used, without making other adjustments.


If you like a heavier, denser roll, use more.

jaywillie's picture
jaywillie

I had what I thought was a large sweet potato, and ended up with 217 grams of cooked potato. I could have scraped a bit more off the skin, but I was aiming for 200g as mentioned in other posts in this thread, so I used the 217g. My rolls came out well, and 200g is what I'm going to aim at when I make these in the future. 

TessN's picture
TessN

I made these yesterday and they were just delicious!  My only change was to add most of the zest from one orange.  The aroma and flavor were great.  I will definitely make these again.  Thanks for sharing this.

flourgirl51's picture
flourgirl51

Floyd- do you think that this would work with winter squash instead of sweet potatoes? The rolls look great!

Floydm's picture
Floydm

I think it is worth a shot!  If you try it, let us know how they come out.

saltandserenity's picture
saltandserenity

I just love this idea.  Sweet potato rolls!! so pretty.

clazar123's picture
clazar123

Potatoes offer some starch and the squash is also higher in water content so you may need to compensate for that. Otherwise it sounds like a great idea.

goodbetterbest's picture
goodbetterbest

I just made these for a holiday party, and they were a huge hit! Everyone was commenting on the wonderful sweet rolls. 


The only difficulty I had was that they definitely took much longer to rise, and didn't ever actually double. The rolls turned out great all the same though!


Thanks again for the great recipe! 

tananaBrian's picture
tananaBrian

I want to make these for Christmas, but want to use SAF Gold, the osmotolerant yeast from SAF that Eric had such good luck with in how it performed with these rolls.  He said they rose very nicely (scroll way up or search upwards on 'ehanner' or 'Eric')


 


Brian


 


 

mmmyummy's picture
mmmyummy

that these would turn out well if soymilk were to be substituted for the milk? 


In general, there are many bread recipes that call for milk, butter, sour cream, etc.  Does anybody have experience with getting good results using non-dairy substitutes for these products?   Suggestions?  Suggestions?  Thank you

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

didn't work. Guess you need the milkfat.


anna

Jennafer's picture
Jennafer

I made them earlier today for my inlaws. I am telling you when your inlaws like something you know you did good. I did use purple sweet potatos though instead of regular ole orange ones. The result was a beautiful purple lump of soft sweetness. They will be made again.

dianaspy's picture
dianaspy

Hi- 


I'm used to seeing sweet potatoes come in many sizes, and I want to be sure I'm using the right amount.  How much baked sweet potato should I use, measured in cups? 

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

The author specifies an "average" size sweet potato.


3/4 cup to 1 cup.


According to King Arthur Flour, a "medium" sweet potato yields 3/4 cup of baked mashed product.


More than a cup and the rolls will probably start getting a little dense.

TNBentRyder's picture
TNBentRyder

Gonna use your rolls in a bread pudding for Thanksgiving. I made rolls and a loaf on Sunday and they turned out very nice; had a roll toasted for breakfast yesterday. I did add an egg and 2 tbsp of butter, and ended up using a bit more flour. Got the bread cubed now, just waiting to mix the rest of the bread pudding and bake fresh so it is warm for Thanksgiving day; the bread just needs some time to dry so it soaks up the custard mix.

dianaspy's picture
dianaspy

Thanks for the response to measurement in cups-now just one more question. 


 


Sweet potatoes generally have white flesh and brown skin.  Yams have flesh ranging from orange(ish) to red.  The two are often confused.  From the descriptions and photos, it looks like folks are using yams, not sweet potatoes.


Does the recipe mean to call for sweet potatoes, or yams? 

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Take your pick.

Jennafer's picture
Jennafer

I used purple sweet potatos in mine mostly, but have tried all three and never had any problems

Chuck's picture
Chuck

"tastes great"<->"less filling"

mw's picture
mw

You've got that backwards, actually. Yams are actually a starchy member of the Dioscoreaceae family, to which the sweet potato does not belong. In fact, a true yam is not even sweet! Yams are incredibly large, and typically have white flesh, though some have flesh that can be pinkish. Calling a sweet potato by the name of "yam" is actually only done in certain regions of Canada and the USA.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yam_%28vegetable%29


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sweet_potato

Jennafer's picture
Jennafer

I have to say my family love these rolls but on making them the second time around I made a few adjustments here's my changed ingredient list they are very light but still amazing this way also. Don't think I am trying to sat the original isn't good, just thought some other ideas would be helpful


1 cup sweet potato, baked
11/3 cup milk  1/2 cup butter


1/2 cup turbinado sugar
3-4 cups all-purpose flour
1 pkg instant yeast
1 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg


 


 

tananaBrian's picture
tananaBrian

...Nothing wrong with experimenting.  If nothing else, we all have slight variations in what we think is best for something.  I always follow a recipe exactly on the first pass, then 'tune' according to my own preferences from then on.  Got any pix of your 'adjusted' version rolls?


 


Brian


 

Jennafer's picture
Jennafer

thankx for makin me feel better. I am still learning, i aint been makin bread long, but so far i love it I generally do the same as you follow exact first time then change after that

TuzaHu's picture
TuzaHu

How would this be as a loaf rather than rolls, slice and toast?  The color is wonderful.  I wonder about doing this with a sugar/cinnamon swirl and roll up jelly roll style.  The dark color of the swirl cinnamon and this sunset color of the sweet potato might be exceptional.


I'm going to make this.

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Hmmm... That sounds pretty good.  If you try it, please let us know how it comes out!

BjornErik's picture
BjornErik

This recipe sounded good and I ended up doing what I generally object to... making changes before I have attempted the original!!  I added an egg and a half cup butter, used brown sugar, increased the cinnamon and nutmeg by 50%, and steeped a few strands of saffron in the milk to help maintain the beautiful color.  I also added a half cup of soaked golden raisins.  The recipe took about an extra cup of flour due to the egg and butter and yielded enough for a 500g loaf, 6 buns and 11 rolls @ 60g ea...  brushed all with an egg-wash prior to baking.  The rising was slower... about 2 hrs for each.  They were delicious, and would make lovely Hot Cross Buns.  The loaf sliced well and toasted up nicely, but I much prefer the rolls and the buns as I don't particularly care for the taste of toasted breads made with eggs.  They seem to toast up differently due to the added richness... I think they toast quicker and I never think to adjust the color selecter down for a more gentle toasting.  The recipe is certainly a keeper!

brian camp's picture
brian camp

Floyd, the rolls were a definite hit yesterday.  I bought enough yams to also make a sweet potato pie rather than my usual pumpkin.  More raves from the fan club on the rolls over the pie.  thanks for this recipe.  brian

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Glad to hear they turned out well.

bored2tears's picture
bored2tears

I made these yesterday, and boy, they were delicious! This was the first time I made rolls... actually, it was the first time I ever used yeast or made any type of bread. I was a little disappointed that they didn't look like the ones in the picture, but they were AMAZING.


I used an egg wash on the eggs before baking, and made 12 rolls. The rolls were a lot bigger than I expected (still, I had 3. That's how good they were.)


Only problem for me was my sweet potato refused to be mashed, so I have a less orange chunky rolls. Still, I am glad that I found this site, glad I found your recipe, and making them for Christmas. Thanks so much!

theavidbaker's picture
theavidbaker

I made these yesterday but with butternut squash instead.  I increased the amounts of cinnamon and nutmeg; I also added some allspice for more of a festive flair. They had a gorgeous colour coming out of the oven-- bronze and tinged with a deep, warm orange colour.  I also glazed them with some honey to add another layer of flavour.


Thanks for the terrific recipe!


http://theavidbaker.wordpress.com/

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

Thank you Floyd for sharing this recipe and altough i'm a little late for Thanksgiving, I wanted to give this a try for normal consumption.  I don't know what the texture would be like if I used 100% AP flour and I decided to experiment with  350 AP plus 150 bread flour, 210grm of the orrange flesh sweet potato and approx 50 grms brown sugar.   I also managed to get some SAF gold label and this gave me a very good rise within 1 hr.  I'll try and make this with pumpkin another time. 



I couldn't wait and scoffed one of the buns before I took the pictures :)

moldyclint's picture
moldyclint

Made a sourdough version of these the other day, and I concur - delicious indeed!  Am now thinking of  (goes to check what others have done - yes, numerous examples) taking this in a cinnamon roll direction.  Thanks again!

ahmz's picture
ahmz

Thank you the recipe is excellent , i tried it today and it turned out good and my family enjoyed it. http://ahmz-homecooking.blogspot.com

mamaeight's picture
mamaeight

I made the sweet potato roll recipe this morning.  The "pne sweet potato" ingredient was vague.  I bought some sweet potatoes last month that weighed 1 1/2 lbs each.  I used about 1/4 of one.  Also, I seldom make rolls so I baked the bread in four small (4") bread pans.  And I was out of cinnamon so I substituted cardamom.  The result was very good with a great texture.

AW's picture
AW

Hi Floyd,


I made these yesterday and they were supersticky, nearly impossible to shape. I know they're right because they look like your photos. The flavor was great though and the color beautiful.


If you ever do a more close measure of the potato and flour will you repost? I suspect those are the vague areas with which I could use your help. Or perhaps this is just the manner of this dough?


-Arlene

mw's picture
mw

I'm wondering how these would be as hamburger buns? My family likes to use "potato rolls" and these look just like them. Can anyone who has made these tell me if the result is anything like store-bought potato rolls or potato bread?

Novice Baker's picture
Novice Baker

I was really surprised that there wasn't a single comment on these beautiful rolls not being beautiful. Maybe that's why I had to take it on. (First though - I can't believe there's an ad for Bisquick at the top of this page!)

I'm not totally new to baking but I haven't tried many recipes, or had many misses, until now. Here's the rundown of how it went wrong. I thought it was odd that the recipe called for just dumping the yeast in with the cold (I assumed) milk and other stuff, but I did it. I discovered that I only had whole wheat flour so I used all whole wheat. I don't keep milk usually so I used soymilk, checking to make sure it contained some fat (it did). I read the first few comments, where everything was wonderful, not the ones that said maybe heat the milk, especially since my potato had been baked the night before & was cold, too. I also didn't see the "soymilk won't work" comment. The dough never rose more than a tiny, nearly imperceptible amount. But I carried on! What I have now are tasty little gut bombs of cinnamony sweetness. I did not bring them to my friends for dinner since I didn't want anything to outheavy the steak they were serving.

Here's the question -- do I change only one thing at a time to find out where it went wrong or do I change it all, so that I'm more likely to have a good result? Since milk is the only ingredient I don't usually have on hand, I'd really like to make them with soy milk. I've been doing that with other baked goods - cookies, scones -- and had no problems. Other than that, I think I'll try less sugar (I used brown), half white and half whole wheat flour, rising in the garage (where it's warm) and an egg wash. Any other suggestions, if anyone is still following this thread?

G-man's picture
G-man

Novice Baker,

Why is milk not an option, if you don't mind me asking?

Novice Baker's picture
Novice Baker

Hey G-man,

I don't mind you asking at all. Milk is an OK option but since I don't drink it, I don't have it onhand. When I buy it for something like this, it always seems like a waste because what's leftover just goes bad. And I've used soy in so many other things, it seems like it should work here. And, I figured out that I was using active dry yeast and not proofing, so I imagine that's the bulk of the problems. I'll adjust, try again, and post the results. This seems like a wonderful group!

Lynett

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Changing only one thing at a time is usually a good idea, but based on what you are saying here is how I would imagine the recipe would be effected:

  • Whole wheat instead of white flour: that'll produce a much denser roll.  Bump up the yeast and give it more time to rise, but still expect it to be heavier.
  • Soy milk instead of regular milk: I'm not sure. If fat content is lower, the rolls will not be quite as soft.
  • Reducing the sugar: the rolls will not be as sweet or brown as much in the oven.
Also, be certain you are using instant rather than active dry yeast.  Proofing isn't necessary for instant yeast.  If you have active dry yeast you can use it, but you will want to proof it first.Good luck.-Floyd
Novice Baker's picture
Novice Baker

Hey Floyd,

You really are a great guy to post all these amazing recipes and keep up with the posts and everything. Thanks again.

As for the sweet potato rolls - I figured out that I used active dry yeast & didn't proof. Combine that with the all whole wheat flour and, yeah, the rolls are pretty dense. Next time I'll go half wheat, half white on the flour, stick with soymilk and maybe add a bit of half & half to up the fat or add some butter, and I'm using dark brown sugar so I won't worry about the color. I asked my partner to get flour at the store & she came home with bread flour. I was going to ask what's the difference but I bet I can find it in all the fabulous info on this site.

Thanks!

Lynett

jaywillie's picture
jaywillie

If you don't have milk around, you could use dry milk (not you, Floyd, but the OP). Just add the dry milk to the mix along with the amount of water necessary to make one cup. [I did not try this in this recipe, but dry milk is found in more than a few enriched bread formulas.]

I have this rising as I type. I did some research about roasting a sweet potato, and "low and slow" seemed to be the way to go to bring out all the sugars. I did mine -- a large sweet potato, for about 2 hours at 300 F. The sugars of the potato were indeed oozing out of the potato after that time. (I come back later and comment about how the rolls tasted!)

One other comment about the potato -- if you were making mashed potatoes, using a processor would be a real no-no. It just turns the starch of the potato into s gluey mess. I don't know how that might impact this recipe, but I treated the potato more gently, just mashing it with a fork. 

Novice Baker's picture
Novice Baker

Ok, I tried these rolls again. The changes (from my initial attempt under How to screw up these rolls above) were that I activated the yeast this time & used whole wheat flour for just a part of the total flour - 1/2 cp. For the yeast, I took 1/4 cp of the milk (I used Silk brand organic no sugar added soy milk) and heated it just a tad in the microwave then dumped the yeast in and sloshed it around with a pinch of brown sugar. That sat while I put everything else together (used brown sugar and a scant measure since they were too sweet the first time) then added the very bubbly yeast & stirred, eventually adding an additional cup of white (unbleached) flour. I kneaded for 10 minutes then let it rest. Got a nice first rise though the second rise was pretty minimal. I did brush with egg wash. They turned out great! I ate one plain with butter and used another to make a ham sandwich with stoneground mustard & a little honey. So yummy! Thanks for all the help from Floyd & G-Man.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I had some left over haikado squash (fine, dry) left over from oven baking for dinner.  The cold bits crumbled and I got to thinking about throwing together a yellow dough for a change.  The rolls were staring me in the face (thanks Floyd) and I got to wondering how these would be in something a little more like cinnamon rolls, snails rolled up and baked in a 8.5 x 11.5 inch (22 x 30 cm) pan.   I converted to metric using my cups and teaspoons and then using scales.  I reduced the salt and glad I did because I didn't need all the flour.  

Sweet Potato Rolls   (substitution of squash)   

  • 260g baked squash, fine pore, cold & crumbly
  • 236g milk  (3.5% fat or whole milk)
  • 96g Demerara brown cane sugar
  • 250g AP wheat flour
  • 120g AP wheat flour   added in 40g scoops at a time
  • 10g salt  (reduced from 11 to 12 g)
  • 6.2 g instant yeast
  • 0.2 g grated nutmeg
  • 1 g ground cinnamon 

Followed directions as in Floyds original posting at the top.  I liked the idea of pecans and dried fruit, maybe a little candied or grated orange peel if the kids let me.  I folded the dough after the 45 min bulk rise and let it rest 10 minutes to relax.   I stretched out a rectangle (using flour) and covered with 200g frozen blueberries, one tablespoon of brown sugar and hints of candied orange peel so that not more than 3 little tiny pieces ended up in each portion.  Rolled up the dough and cut into 12 pieces placing in a well buttered shiny 22 x 30 cm pan.   Then I stuck broken pecan nuts into the tops of each roll and let them crowd into one another while preheating the oven to 200°C.  Bake went fast and was done around 20 minutes with convection.  Brushed a sugar/vanilla/cream glaze over the tops while hot and they are scruptious warm and going fast!   Oozing with blueberries!

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Wow.  Those look wonderful.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Now that the rest have cooled down, they are loosing their blue berry taste.   There are so many competing flavours.  I asked my son if he could tell if there were blue berries in the rolls, and he nodded, "no, not really," as he stuffed another one down.  "Sure are good though!"  was his reply when he could speak again.  I was concerned that the nuts and pumpkin notes were dominating.  I think they are taking over.  "Not a problem,"  came the response.  

I think it is.  I put all those blue berries into it, they ought to last a while.  Rolls are very moist and nuts on top are crunchy. Bright yellow crumb with dark veins of fruit, the little bit of added sugar helped the juices thicken.  The contrast is great!  

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Yeah, I can imagine that the blueberries might get overwhelmed by everything else in there.

I think I've been in Portland too long, because looking at them, the first modification that comes to my mind?  Bacon.  Holy smokes that would be good.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I can see chili pepper flakes (and I got strings!) and black pepper too!  When I had the dough rolled out it was trying to scream focaccia!  Do you believe it?  I had to keep focused.  (next batch)  

Bacon.   I ought to show you the chunk sitting here waiting to be cut.  "Kaiserfleisch"  743 g  made a few kilometers west of here.  How would you like it?   Bacon fried and covered in dough or crunched into bits into the dough or just lying on top during the bake with the drippings going down into the rolls?  Or how about tiny little cubes in the dough or with slivers of chilies or or think caramel, smoked bacon, served with a fried egg in the middle with a little melted cheese. the ol BLT!!!

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

I think, personally I would prefer running dripping crunchy bacon to blueberries :)

anna

 

lafmore's picture
lafmore

Ha!Ha! This is my first adventure with Fresh Loaf... I was looking for a recipe for pita bread so I can learn to replicate Stacy's cinnamon sugar baked pita chips - yum! Then I see "sweet potato rolls" on your list and had to check it out. I've now spent way too long reading through the thread and enjoying everyone's comments, questions and variations. But, I really had to stop and have a good laugh over your reference to Portland and bacon! I assume you've experienced VooDo Donuts?! (spelling?). My husband is an airline pilot who often flies in/out of PDX. However, it was one of our son's friends doing a summer internship out there who introduced him to the place. After that, Don has brought home VooDos to Cincy... I'm sure you can imagine how well that works! The 1st time wasn't bad, but the 2nd time he brought a "bucket" of day old that were all stuffed together and hot weather... By the time they got home...well...it was an adventure! But, back to the rolls, if you do decide to give that a try, do add the maple glaze and let us know how it goes. Wow! I'm getting huuuunnnnnnggggrrrrryyyyy!

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I got the bacon and I got the berries    :)

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I figured out a better order for filling.  

After rolling out, first the room temp ingredients with frozen berries coming last.  That way I don't have juice all over the place.   They also cut cleaner as the dough takes on some frost from the berries.  The cleaner look however does not look as appetizing when baked and glazed.   The solution is to save a few big spoons of berries on the side while the rest get rolled into the log.  Then after the cut rolls are placed into the pan, brush and slop the thawed out berry juice around.  

The dough did take a long time to double.  About 13 hours!  Not a problem.  :)  I did it on purpose.  I planned it that way. 

Let me back up a bit.  I like long wet times on my dough, feel it's healthier regardless what kind of grain used.  This recipe is no exception.  So... I mixed up the dough without yeast (like I forgot it) covered it and sat it in my drafty cold window at about 20°C.   About 10 hours later (when I was good and ready) tipped out the dough onto a lightly floured surface and spread it out keeping the top surface free of flour.  Sprinkled on the missing instant yeast and rolled it up.  Then kneaded for a few minutes until I felt the yeast well dispersed.  Put the dough back in the bowl, covered it and set the bowl onto my shelf above a radiator (27°C) and waited about 3 hrs for it to double.  It might have doubled a little sooner but that is when I remembered it.  I poked the dough with my finger and it did not deflate so it was just fine.   Proceeded to roll out dough, fill, roll up, cut, proof and bake.  Very nice crumb.  

Yerffej's picture
Yerffej

Mini,

This is not the first time that I have wondered why I even bother baking when I could just be eating at your house.

Jeff

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

:)   make it quick!   There's only one left!   

Here is a "before baking" picture:

jefferey13's picture
jefferey13

I just tried these rolls today in preparation for Thanksgiving. They are very delicious. The only thing that could be hard about the recipe is how much room for your own judgement there is. "one" sweet potato is not very specific. I also didn't know if they sweet potato would be more like a liquid and cause it to be wet or like flour and dry it out. It was much more or the wet side which should have been apparent when the recipe only calls for 25-33% hydration. So after all this long explanation my point is your flour usage is going to be related to the size of the potato. I had a huge potato, and I had to use quite a bit more flour then the recipe called for. I probably should have upped the cinnamon and nutmeg too, but I didn't. In conclusion, they are dense, hearty, delicious rolls. Make them!

jaywillie's picture
jaywillie

If you weigh your ingredients, I can attest that about 200g of sweet potato works, as others have posted. I roasted what I thought was a large sweet potato and came up with 217g, and I used all of it. My rolls came out very well. I did not measure the potato, so I can't add anything to that.

jefferey13's picture
jefferey13

I do weigh my ingredients, thats a good tip for the future. I didn't really read all the posts, I just saw the recipe and made it. Thanks

mw's picture
mw

I see that your recipe calls for instant yeast. My stores don't carry that. I don't remember if I have rapid rise yeast or just active dry yeast. How would I substitute?

Chuck's picture
Chuck

The newfangled "instant" yeast comes from an improvement to the process of making dry yeast granules. The granules are a little smaller and more of the yeast cells are 'not dead'.There are too many slightly different and possibly confusing names for this stuff: here on TFL you'll often see ADY (Active Dry Yeast) for the older stuff and IDY (Instant Dry Yeast) for the newer stuff.

Because of the improvements IDY "wakes up" so quickly and so well it's usually used dry (without dissolving it in liquid first). That's important for bread machines (many of which won't work with the old "active dry yeast") and a very few recipes that have a reason for adding it dry.

Mostly ADY and IDY are interchangeable though, and one or the other is specified in recipes simply because that's what the recipe writer had in their cupboard. Because fewer of the yeast cells in IDY are 'dead', if you want to be more precise either add or subtract 1/4 of the yeast weight when converting. Here's some specific examples: if the recipe calls for 4 grams of ADY, you can substitute 3 grams of IDY instead; and if the recipe calls for 4 grams of IDY, you can substitute 5 grams of ADY instead. But if you say "heck with precision" and just use exactly the same weight, it will work anyway. Rise and proof times may be a little longer or shorter than you're used to, but there are so many other variables (like the weather for instance) that the differences from the different kinds of yeast will probably get completely covered up.

Although 99% of the time IDY is used dry and ADY is dissolved, you don't have to follow the customary usage. If you dissolve IDY in your liquid, it will still work fine. And if you use ADY dry, it will take an extra half hour or so to wake up, but it will get there eventually. Either way, you won't go to jail and you won't bake a brick.

mw's picture
mw

Thank you for the information! I love this damn forum. Everyone is so helpful and knowledgeable, it amazes me every time.

jaywillie's picture
jaywillie

Rapid rise and instant yeast are essentially the same thing. You can use the RR yeast in this recipe without any modifications. You could also use active dry yeast with no problems. Just dissolve that in the liquid before you add it to the dry ingredients.

mw's picture
mw

I think rapid rise is what I have, so thay really works out for me.

fridayeudaemonism's picture
fridayeudaemonism

I used this recipe today with a few tweaks. I used about half wholemeal flour and half white flour, and only about 1/4 cup of white sugar. I let it rise for about 3 hours (while we were out this morning), and put the dough into the oven as soon as we got home. Added some sesame seeds on top (so it still looks pretty if the dough doesn't rise evenly or cracks or something). Fresh bread with lunch! Very enjoyable, not too sweet. It's super nice even by itself. I'm loving the colour. I'm surprised how fluffy it still is, despite using wholemeal flour as well. I might try more wholemeal next time. :)

Here's the end result!

mw's picture
mw

I made these for Thanksgiving, and they barely rose at all. I expected they would rise in the oven like those of other commenters, but they did not. They were pretty dense as a result. What did I do wrong? Can over or under kneading case these results?

 

In any case, I've been requested to make them again, so I'll get to try another batch.

fridayeudaemonism's picture
fridayeudaemonism

Did the dough rise much when you let it rest before you put it in the oven? I know my dough for this took longer than expected to rise before it went into the oven, and then I had it cooking at 200˚C for about 40 minutes. I did use extra wholemeal flour and my ingredients were about fridge temperature when I started with them... maybe this makes a difference?

If your dough didn't rise much at all maybe something is up with the yeast you're using?

mw's picture
mw

No, it did not rise much before I put it in the oven. I had it in a warm spot, but I figured like other posyers on this thread that it would rise in the oven. The problem could have been my yeast. I used ADY, a littleb more than the recipe called for in instant, but I didn't proof it. Next time I will.

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Many a loaf I felt were failures due to density or lack of oven spring are favorites around here...As I learned new tricks to 'fix' things my family response to a loaf I felt I had finally gotten 'right' was "but we like it the other way"  and, in some instances, I can't get it back to they way they liked it...

So if people are liking how yours turned out.....maybe you shouldn't try to fix it either :-)  

Janet

mw's picture
mw

I'll consider that! I did think it was strange to get requests to make it again, even though I thought it was wrong. It was tasty, though, regardless of texture!

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

As many here say "Taste Rules"  and I have to agree.  If it doesn't taste good - no matter the preparation - it doesn't get eaten and I strive to bake to please the palates of those for whom I bake :-)  Makes for a happy baker and happy friends and neighbors.

Janet

jaywillie's picture
jaywillie

I've made this recipe twice in the last month. First time, when I was not pressed for time, they came out well. I did them for Thanksgiving, and although I thought I had timed things pretty well and had allowed enough time, I knew from the dough that I did not get a complete ferment or proof. So they came out pretty dense. They still tasted pretty good, but were a bit doughy.

I think we need to expect that the rising times will need to be lengthened when there are cooked potatoes in the mix. I cooked my potatoes the night before and stored them in the refrigerator overnight, so they were not warm or even room temperature when mixed, and I bet that had something to do with it as well. 

My advice would be to be sure you allow plenty of time for both risings. Floyd's times are guidelines (as are the rising times in any bread formula), and I think this one needs a lot more time than most. If the room isn't at 80 F, I say allow a couple hours for the first rise and 1-2 for the second.

taurus430's picture
taurus430

This is an old thread but I'm still going to try and comment. I just started making dinner rolls and did experiment using sweet potato. I have several recipes and noticed they add 1 egg to the ingredients. Is an egg unnecessary when using sweet potato, as besides this recipe, another one I have does not add egg. The plain dinner rolls (no potato), seem to add an egg.

taurus430's picture
taurus430

I made sweet potato rolls for Easter  with left over sweet potato I had in the freezer. I used 1/2 buttermilk, 1/2 water and they were a big hit. After the rolls came out of the oven, I brushed them with butter/honey mixture. 

Today we made ham & cheese sandwiches on the rolls.......so good!!!!

get_baked09's picture
get_baked09

I recently made these rolls, but I made a couple adjustments to the recipe.  First, I proofed the yeast in 1 T of maple syrup dissolved in the water (I always proof my yeast even if a recipe doesn't call for it, it's just a habit).  This added just a slight maple taste to the rolls, which I think works perfectly with sweet potatos, cinnamon, and brown sugar!  I am also one who enjoys the taste of sweet potatos on their own, so I cut back on the brown sugar a little bit to allow the potatos to really come out.  I am just starting to dabble with Rye flour, so I had to try some of that out.  I substituted 1/3 C flour for 1/3 C Rye flour to see what would happen.  The rolls ended up being a little more dense and chewy, but that was still delicious!  Finally, I cut up the sweet potato and boiled it for about 15-20 min instead of baking it.  After boiling the sweet potato, I ended up having about 400g of mashed sweet potato because there was some water retained in the potato itself.

So those are all the adjusments I made to the recipe and they turned out AMAZING!  It was like Thanksgiving in 1 bite!

Thank you for the recipe it was delicious!

marcoleavitt's picture
marcoleavitt

I would like to make these rolls for a Kwanzaa celebration on Thursday (Dec. 27) and could really use some helpful advice. I tried these once before and they came out very dense and not at all good. Nice aroma, but really difficult to eat. Can someone advise on what technique to use on kneading and shaping, and any other tips? When I tried to make them before the dough was very sticky and difficult to knead and they failed to rise much at all. After several hours of waiting for them to rise, I popped them in the oven hoping for a miracle oven spring, and it just didn't happen. I'm certain my yeast is fine, as I bake fairly regularly and have had no other problems with it.

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Hi Marco,

You could try doubling the yeast or using a super small sweet potato.  It should work using whatever kneading technique you usually use.  Good luck! 

-Floyd

Salvia's picture
Salvia

I'm going to make a double batch tomorrow. One for rolls to eat with butter or cream cheese or sandwiches or.... And the second to make cinnamon rolls. I'm glad I read the comments and know to expect a loooong rising time. I have made a new recipe from your site every day for the past several days and have learned so much already. My bread baking was okay before, but now I'm able to explore many more things than I could before. Thank you so much for this site!

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Thanks for the kind words!  Good luck!

Salvia's picture
Salvia

It's hard to resist adding more flour when I'm used to a much less floppy dough, but I held out and kept the dough very floppy. I needed tons of flour to roll it out for cinnamon rolls, but it wasn't hard to work with at all and the color is gorgeous. My two older daughters came into the kitchen while I was rolling up the cinnamon rolls and they both said it smelled amazing. Ten more minutes of rising time and it will be ready to pop in the oven. I haven't tasted it yet, but so far it looks and smells awesome! 

Salvia's picture
Salvia

I frosted them with a good helping of powdered sugar frosting about five minutes out of the oven. Then when I couldn't stand it anymore, I snagged one and devoured it in seconds. Only then did I go and tell my daughters they were ready ;-). Both my daughters and my husband concur that these are heavenly. I just hope some of them are left by the time my youngest daughter and son come home from their friends LOL. If not, I'll just have to make another batch. My 14 year old daughter wants me to thank you for this recipe. So, thank you :-). Now to get the semolina loaf out of the oven...

Salvia's picture
Salvia

...that the dough didn't require a long rising time at all. I added about 1/4 tsp of extra yeast than the recipe called for, but not more. I think the big difference is that I didn't allow the sweet potato to cool much at all before mixing it with the cup of cold milk. By the time the yeast went into the mix, it was still quite warm, but not too much so. The yeast clearly loved the environment it had been thrown into  and had a big party. After covering the dough to let it rise, I left the house and came back about 90 minutes later to find the dough about to flop right out of the bowl it had risen so much. After assembling thecinnamon rolls and drenching them in melted butter, the dough still rose very nicely and had a great oven spring as well. This recipe is definitely going down in the 'family favorites' file!

laurageran's picture
laurageran

This has been a great staple recipe of mine! Thanks for the recipe! I have just referred my readers to your recipe!

Thanks!

www.mandarinandthyme.com

mini_maggie's picture
mini_maggie

You know this thread has to be resurrected at Thanksgiving!

First time making these and using my bread machine to do the kneading and bulk rise.  Recipe calls for just one bulk rise before shape and proof - my bread machine dough cycle does one rise 46 mins, then stir down and a second rise 20-25 min.  Will the stir down and shorter second rise hurt, or should I rescue the dough after the first 45 min rise to shape and proof?

Another question is the rationale for AP flour vs bread flour.   Was tempted to try bread flour but figured I'd better stick to recipe first time.  Any reason not to use bread flour in these?

I've probably added too much flour - ended up using 3.5 cups for 218 g mashed sweet potato.  Dough is silky but not very tacky (was dreading a sticky dough-handling nightmare) - hopefully they won't end up too tough.

Thanks to all for sharing the wealth of experience here and especially to Floyd for this recipe!

Floydm's picture
Floydm

You should be fine with the short second rise and bread flour would work fine too.  

Good luck! I hope they turn out well.

mini_maggie's picture
mini_maggie

These turned out great and were a big hit.   Thanks for making a first-timer look good!

BobS's picture
BobS

Finally got around to making these. Really good. They won't last til Thanksgiving.

 

heavyhanded's picture
heavyhanded

First, thanks so much for putting this recipe up.

Second, thanks to everyone who mentioned not reading far down the thread...I didn't see that the dough was supposed to be sticky. Also thanks to all y'all who asked how much sweet potato to add - went for 3/4ths cup but used more due to distraction at opportune moment.

I had this can of yams and I made this recipe just to use it. After mashing and mixing up, I let dough sit for 10 minutes then started first knead. Dough was so sticky and I was leery of adding so much flour, but did anyway. Still sticky so I let it sit for another 10 minutes and again kneaded for 10 minutes. Let sit for 10 minutes.

Still sticky, not tacky so added a bit more flour (Gold Medal All-Purpose), kneaded some more and got it to a "satiny" feel so called it done and set it to rise.

Then I sat down to re-read thread and saw the part where it said dough was supposed to be sticky. When I went to poke test after 45 minutes I noticed how heavy the dough was. It finally passed the poke test after and hour and three-quarters.

I divided and shaped into 12 rolls, let rise another hour and a half, then baked. The canned yams were packed in syrup and I thought the final product would be very sweet but no, there is only a slight taste of sweet, cinnamon and yam (my nutmeg may be old.) The rolls were nice and squishy, with a pleasantly crisp crust.

I am once again amazed at how forgiving bread can be. Will be making again. Thank you!

11 rolls and one tore open

 

 

 

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Glad to hear they worked out for you!

flour-power's picture
flour-power

Thanks for this sweet potato roll recipe, Floyd! Sweet potatoes are a pretty regular part of my diet, so it's no trouble to roast an extra one for these rolls. Here's a shot of last night's meal, spinach-lentil soup and those wonderful rolls. Oh, the color!

andychrist's picture
andychrist

Would an equal volume (3/4 cup) roasted carrot work as well as sweet potato in this kind of recipe, or would it not be starchy enough? What kind of adjustment might help? Thanks.

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Good question... I don't know. I've never baked with carrot like that. Anyone? 

If you give it a shot, let us know how it turns out.

andychrist's picture
andychrist

Okay I substituted carrot for the sweet potato, threw in a tablespoon of potato starch, came out fine. Another stupid question: Is it necessary to roast the SP before hand, or might it just be grated or pureed instead? Thinking this would heat up the kitchen a bit less in the coming warm months. Roasting does caramelize the tubers so perhaps there would be less flavor if they went in raw... or the hydration would be askew? Carrot puree at least could be reduced on the stove top. Dunno about  sweet potato though, suspect its starchiness might cause it to burn more readily in the pot. Carrots I bought today also seem much brighter orange than the sweet potatoes I just roasted, so might stick with them anyway just for the intensity of the color, if I can't discern any other difference in the bake.