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Sourcream as efficient, good substitute for egg

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Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Sourcream as efficient, good substitute for egg

I apologize beforehand if this post is in the wrong place.  I do not know if there is a forum for allergy substitute related topics.  Please move accordingly.

I'm posting the substitution for egg.  My whole family is vegetarian and we use sourcream as our substitute.  It works for anything, including pumpkin pies, cookies, cakes, and quick breads.  Use 1 1/2 Tablespoon sourcream (or one heaped Tablespoon) in the place of one egg.  Beat in air when you add the sourcream just like you would with the egg.  Voila!

We've tried a lot of different things as a substitute for egg---lots of nasty batches.  Then we hit upon sourcream. 

Using sourcream or any milk product as a substitute for egg has nothing to do with the flavor, but with holding the mixture together without becoming brittle and helping it to puff up (like cookies and cakes).

Milk (which is composed of all of its by-products, i.e. cream, sourcream, butter) has an amazing ability to bind fat and liquid. In fact, that is what it does: milk binds fat and liquid together.

Sourcream is a milk product, which, as a milk product contains lactose and casein. Google casein to learn about its binding abilities. Milk is known to hold things together in different forms like plain milk in cornbread or whipped cream in a pie.

Sourcream is cheaper than eggs.  Using sourcream in your recipes will also allow for more variety in products (for those of you who own or work in shops/bakeries). 

I'm not selling anything nor trying to start an argument.  I simply want others to know what has taken us a few years to find out.  (that and as a consumer as well....I do not purchase from companies that use egg...)

Constructive comments welcomed.  Arguments discouraged.  I'm not knocking anyone else's technique,  just introducing a relatively new idea.

Anjali's picture
Anjali

Thanks for the tip! My family is vegetarian too. I have been looking for an egg substitute for a long time. It will be wonderful if this works.Will post results after I experiment.

Anjali 

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

Eggs perform many different functions. In cake, they leaven. In cookies, they bind fat to liquid and they moisten the crumb. In custards, they're everything. Quiche without egg? Crazy talk. They perform so many different functions in the kitchen that much of baking would be impossible without them.

While sourcream might be an adequate substitute in some situations, it simply won't work at all in others, especially as the quantity of egg increases per a given dish. It might work for a cookie recipe, but a cake recipe that calls for several eggs (and multiple techniques to incorporate those eggs into a batter or dough) will be an unmitigated disaster, to say nothing of the taste and pH, which would be wholly modified by such a substitution.

It's great that vegetarians and vegans have a substitute, but to say that sourcream can efficently substitute for egg is patently wrong.

Yerffej's picture
Yerffej

"...to say that sourcream can efficently substitute for egg is patently wrong."

It would appear that this is not true at the original poster's home.

Happy Thanksgiving

Jeff

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

One must surround one's home with belief bubble wrap wherein physics and chemistry are mere suggestions! (I suppose that's not too far from what's coming out of the Large Hadron Collider these days, but I digress).

What is this Thanksgiving? Is that today? Must be. The construction scene outside my house is eerily quiet. I don't hear the Beep, Beep, Beep of CATerpillar machines in reverse. 

chickadee3's picture
chickadee3 (not verified)

I wasn't very specific in my description of sourcream as a substitute for egg, in terms of the types of recipes that it is useful in.  I mean such recipes where egg is an ingredient not the featured ingredient.  Such recipes (that we have all successfully tried and make reguarly) include:  cookies, cakes, pumpkin pie, muffins, etc. I have personal experience with these recipes, and it is a very useful egg substitute in these recipes (1 1/2 T sourcream for one egg, whipping in air as you would egg)

I haven't tried sourcream as a substitute in recipes where egg is a featured ingredient.  Featured egg dishes would be things like quiche or custard or souffle.  The dishes that feature egg aren't just featuring the binding properties of egg (in my opinion), but also the taste.  Hence, I haven't touched such dishes for our meal plans and don't know of any possible potential subsitutes for such dishes.

I have heard of some uses for other efficient, frugal substitutes as rice flour and cornstarch.  Would anyone be willing to elaborate?  I've heard of wonderful pecan pies, which are made with cornstarch.

Please try, at least, a cookie recipe using sourcream to see what I'm talking about.  If you'd only invest a little time into this idea, you may be able to have massive input and make a big difference in some way.  That could be in your family budget, someone's life, making cooking history---we have cookie lift off! (personal story there), or more egg-free products to sell in your shop.

 

hanseata's picture
hanseata

sometimes get so acerbic... reminds me of being a student in the early seventies.

Though not a vegan or even vegetarian, I like baking the vegan cupcakes from "Vegan Cupcakes Take Over the World (http://www.amazon.com/Vegan-Cupcakes-Take-Over-World/dp/1569242739). They are often moister than regular ones, and simply delicious. Of course the eggs are always substituted:

For 1 egg:                                                                    good for:

1 tsp. ground flaxseed + 3 tbsp. water              pancakes and whole grain items. Not good for recipes with chocolate.

1/4 cup silken tofu                                               dense cakes and brownies, for lighter cakes use only 2 "tofu eggs" for 3 real ones.                                                                                        For cookie dough: add also 1 tsp. starch. Not good for pancakes.

1/2 ripe banana                                                      quick breads, muffins, cakes, pancakes - where banana taste is okay.

1/4 cup soy yogurt                                                 same as silken tofu

These are, of course, all vegan options. (I will make a not of the sour cream) And they work!  

Happy (non fundamentalistic) baking

Karin

 

 

chickadee3's picture
chickadee3 (not verified)

Interesting ideas, Karin.  Thanks!

I would like to ask more details, if I may.  For the flax seed, I have heard that you have to let it gel or something before using.  If that is true, could you please elaborate on how that is done?  Also, I didn't realize that banana has its own holding abilities in some muffin/bread recipes.  Perhaps I can cut out or cut down on the amount of sourcream I use in banana bread, as my current attempts end up a bit too moist for my preference.  (Also, I've lost my dad's old fantastic recipe and I just can't remember what it was!)

Happy baking!

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Only, if you use whole flax seeds you should soak them for several hours (for my flax seed bread I soak them for 12 hours) to make them digestible. But ground flax seed you can use right away.

As I said, I am not even a vegetarian, but I do like those vegan cupcakes, therefore I follow Moskowitz/Romero's recipes. Many are just made with soy milk plus apple cider vinegar, no special extra egg replacer, and they are just wonderfully moist.

Karin

Dobeda's picture
Dobeda

I have used a variety of replacers for egg when baking, applesauce, prune paste, for example.  But for other recipes, Egg Replacer works great when baking.  Can be purchased at your local health food store.  And I will definitely try the sourcream option.  And while you may disagree with chickadee3, why be so snarky?  This is a blog for baking, not politics or snarkiness.

chickadee3's picture
chickadee3 (not verified)

Thanks Dobeda for your comments. 

I'll look at the commercial replacer when I'm at the grocery store.  We generally buy a 5 lb thing of sour cream from the restaurant supply store for $6 about every month and a half (yes we use that much.....makes wonderful creamy sauces!)

Now we've come to the topic of egg substitutes with Flavor! : )  (Sourcream generally doesn't add any flavor to the recipes I've referred to---muffins, quick breads, cookies, cakes).  I've used applesauce for fruit leather, but didn't think about using any fruit in baking.  How thick would you need to have the fruit to have the baked goods still "set" (don't know the general term here---but not doughy anymore).  Like the prune paste you've referenced, is it cooked up really thick like a compote? 

thinking about flavor possibilities....mmmm  i'm hungry now ; )

hanseata's picture
hanseata

I would use that only as last resort, it just doesn't taste as good as other substitutes.

Karin

chickadee3's picture
chickadee3 (not verified)

Karin,

The substitute that I'm talking about is only for recipes that have to have some sort of binder to hold them together.  This page was generally meant as a means to discuss egg substitutions for non-egg-featuring recipes (cookies, cakes, quick breads) for people who can not eat egg for whatever reason.  I'm not talking about substituting for egg flavor or egg featured dishes---when you want eggs or egg taste, by all means, use egg!

One of the main features for me in using sourcream is that it Doesn't have any added flavor.  That way, a cookie still tastes like a cookie!  : )

Dorians mom's picture
Dorians mom

Thank you for the post. It's useful for those times when I run out of eggs but happen to have dairy on hand, as I usually have yoghurt handy.
Casein is used in a lot of applications; namely to substitute for endangered species' by-product like whale baleen. In the needlecrafting world, milk derived casein is used in making knitting needles, for one.
On the ethical front, having been vegetarian for over 30 years, I cook with animal-derived products, and do my utmost to make sure I am getting humanely produced foods. That means organically raised, but not always. Eggs are one of those dangerous zones where just because the package says "organic" doesn't mean the hens are humanely treated. The best way to ensure this is to buy from a neighbor who happens to have laying hens, or a coworker as in my niece's case, so I have ready access to the best eggs in the world: from hens that wander about their yard scratching and gossiping and complaining. These eggs are a variety of sizes and shapes and colors, and make everything taste that much better because they ARE better, in every way.
It's kind of like using cheap sugar rather than pure cane sugar - you can always tell the quality difference, and your body always can as well.
Remember: your food is only as good as the quality of the ingredients that go into it.
And that's my two cents' worth. Thank you. Robyn

chickadee3's picture
chickadee3 (not verified)

Robyn,

The substitute that I'm talking about is only for recipes that need to have some sort of binder to hold them together.  This page was generally meant as a means to discuss egg substitutions for non-egg-featuring recipes (cookies, cakes, quick breads) for people who can not eat egg for whatever reason.    People who have egg allergies, I can assure you---their bodies would be able to tell if something has egg in it or not; but we really don't like finding out that way.

I'm not talking about substituting for egg flavor or egg featured dishes---when you want eggs or egg taste, by all means, use egg! 

Thanks for your discussion about organic eggs and humanely-treated chickens, but unfortunately, that is not what this forum page is about at all.  You might consider starting your own forum page for people who might want to discuss such matters.  Thank you.

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

and the milk for the sour cream comes out of a cow ......     Sorry, obviously, I am not a vegan/vegetarian...   ;)

Anna

 

Dorians mom's picture
Dorians mom

... A lot of people mistakenly think that hens can only lay fertilized eggs.
A vegetarian, generally, does not eat any animal-sourced food resulting in the death of the animal. Generally speaking only, because a lot of people call themselves vegetarian who in point of fact simply don't eat four-footed meat. It's not for me to say that they are not vegetarians; I speak only for myself and my own principles and ethics in the matter of non-vegetable foods.
Given the nuances of being vegetarian, I can understand why many people prefer dairy substitutes for eggs. However, the truth is that hens lay eggs whether or not a rooster is present.
Robyn

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

he felt that an egg could result in a chick and thusly be considered a possible "meat".  Enjoyed your explanation :)

Anna

chickadee3's picture
chickadee3 (not verified)

This page is just about a useful substitute for egg.  We're just talking cooking something in the kitchen, to help people who cannot eat egg.  sheesh

Dorians mom's picture
Dorians mom

I didn't even think of not using egg because one can not eat it. I do apologize. I'm a vegetarian who uses dairy and egg in cooking, and as I have no sensitivity or allergy issues, it didn't cross my mind to think of same when considering using a dairy product in place of an egg product.

As for banana and apple sauce, I've always used those products as the fat replacer, not the egg replacer. Whenever I've done so, however, I feel like the baked product tastes acidic. I have vegan friends, however, and for that reason am following this thread on egg substitutes.
Robyn

chickadee3's picture
chickadee3 (not verified)

One of the main features for me in using sourcream is that it Doesn't have any added flavor.  That way, a cookie still tastes like a cookie!  : )

There are options to use for people who cannot eat egg (for whatever reason).  Flavor (like fruit) or no flavor.  Sometimes, the chocolate needs to stand alone : )  But, a hint of ...banana...might be interesting in something else.  What has someone else tried?

EvaB's picture
EvaB

but for those who do its fine. I personally would rather eat an egg than cornstarch, so will make my pies with eggs. I cannot see how a pumpkin pie can be made with sour cream and not egg when its a CUSTARD pie and custard by definition is eggs.

My odd note, is how you can consider it a substitute for eggs in a vegetarian or vegan diet when its an animal product, and I was sure that either diet considers any animal product as not being on the list, so if you can use sour cream why not egg, unless you are allergic (as not decided on ones own but actually tested by a dr allergic) to eggs.

I really don't think it would work in my Xmas cake recipe which uses at least a dozen eggs (I bake huge amounts of the stuff) and I'm not going to try it out and waste the ingredients if it fails, but if you like it, and others can use it, then its a good substitute.

 

chickadee3's picture
chickadee3 (not verified)

EvaB,

This page was meant to discuss alternative ingredients when a binder such as egg is necessary, but egg cannot be used.  The subject of why my family is vegetarian and choose not to eat egg is another topic, that, frankly, I don't care to discuss.  There are a lot of other people who would, I'm sure, be happy to discuss the tedious and often contradictory points of politics and diet.  Please take it to another page. 

I'm not interested in defending my personal life or dietary issues.  I'm here to have intelligent discussions on possible alternatives to egg where it makes sense.  I'm not trying to make you change anything--I'm not Sam I Am.

 

maxd's picture
maxd

Thank you.  I was diagnosed with an egg allergy a couple years ago and had no idea how many foods and recipes contain eggs before I started eliminating them from my diet.  I have found it is very difficult, have been forced into avoiding almost all desserts, and welcome all suggestions for egg substitutions in baking or cooking.  Really appreciate it.