The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

OK, Now I'm impressed - Brod & Taylor Folding Proofer

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proth5's picture
proth5

OK, Now I'm impressed - Brod & Taylor Folding Proofer

Ok, there are any number of less expensive  ways to keep dough cozy when house temperatures are low.  I know, I know.  It's a toy, ok, I know.

In the course of my so called "normal" life there are extended periods of time when I work a lot of hours under great stress.  And sometimes you need a toy.

And I believe it was Captain Kirk, wasn't it, who said "The more complex the mind, the greater the need for the simplicity of play."?

So this weekend I finally got to play with my folding proofer.

Being of somewhat unsound mind, I pondered mightily what I would use for a bulk ferment container - being absolutely sure that mine wouldn't fit. But it did.  My largest proofing container (which is what I almost always use these days) actually fit.  Just barely, but it fit.

What we really need are some rectangular containers that could fit in a stack because once my big round container is in there is not much real estate for a second batch.  And I'm sure some enterprising individual >hint, hint< will come up with some containers like that.

Half sheet pans are out of the question, of course but I didn't think the proofer would hold that container.  But it did.

Impressive.

I'm not sure I'm ready to attempt uncovered proofing just yet, but I have high hopes for this gadget. Impressive.  And I'm not even a tester.  I paid for the thing.

Innovation lives.

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Pat, you are something else! I love it you quote my hero from the past.

My 1/4 sheet pans I use for focaccia fit well and stack if you use Sylvia's paper clip solution. Also a 9x13 baking pan when you are feeling sinful and desire cinnamon rolls.

Enjoy!

Eric

proth5's picture
proth5

Thanks - I just watched that episode not too long ago and after these past so many weeks the quote really stuck in my head.

I have a baking pan with a depthe of 3 or so inches that has the dimensions of a half sheet pan.  These days when I make sticky buns (brioche dough, topping from AB&P - soooo good) I actually use that pan...

I get to eat one and distribute the rest to very happy friends and neighbors.

I've been focusing on handling larger amounts of dough these days.

But two rectangular tubs for the bulk ferment would be sweet! >hint<

koby2160's picture
koby2160

http://kneader.jp/about/proofer

Just in case you did not know,  this one been around

for a while--but in Japan...

 

 

yy's picture
yy

Leave it up to the Japanese to combine utility with space efficiency. Seems like the Brod and Taylor proofing box has a more compact and elegant design, although I can't quite tell how the Japanese version folds up from its fully assembled state. Is there a link to a video of it in action? I can't read Japanese, and the google chrome translation tool turned up some funny phrases. 

koby2160's picture
koby2160

On the left side of web page there are videos

of different products they make, as well as the proofer

Since I got this one, I left it un folded... it's bigger

than the B&T one--so maybe you need more room

It does work very well.

 

tananaBrian's picture
tananaBrian

Based on the translation, it sounds like they assume a woman would be using it as well.  But anyway, it looks like you lift the front door and top (lid?) off, then the back and sides lift off as one piece, the back has a hinge in the middle that folds forward to allow the sides and back to fold up like an accordian ...now you have 4 things to stack, the unit's base, the accordian-folded back and sides, the top, and the front panel ...done.  The video (lower left side bar of web page) shows it in action.  Sounds like it uses insulated double-wall construction to keep it efficient as well.

Brian

tn gabe's picture
tn gabe

Have to love both google translations and Japanese small appliances!

jennyloh's picture
jennyloh

The Japanese one looks really good.  thanks for the link, they even had recipes!

I was still thinking of getting a unit but it looks costly: USD500 equivalent?

koby2160's picture
koby2160

Yes, it is more expensive...it does have some extra features
like a timer you can set for up to 6 hours, and a much bigger size.
Funny enough, most home ovens available in Japan do have
a fermentation option, at 30c-45c but usually timer limited
to 120 minutes.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

as it is not the same the world over.  I had almost ordered the B & T  and remembered I can't use it.   Is it twelve volt? 

koby2160's picture
koby2160

The voltage is 100V 50/60Hz

jaywillie's picture
jaywillie

Proth5,

I'm considering buying one of these proofing boxes, and in your original description, you wonder about a container that would fit better.

I use this container at times, usually for doughs I'm going to stretch and fold: 

http://cool.cambro.com/Camwear_Food_Pan_Lids_Food_Pans_and_Lids_Storage.ashx

(I use the translucent 10 x 12 version.) It looks like two of those would fit, stacked on top of each other. They are about 5" deep. What do you think?

BTW, I got it from my local restaurant supply house, and it was pretty cheap.

Thanks,

jaywillie

FlourChild's picture
FlourChild

"What we really need are some rectangular containers that could fit in a stack because once my big round container is in there is not much real estate for a second batch.  And I'm sure some enterprising individual >hint, hint< will come up with some containers like that."

"But two rectangular tubs for the bulk ferment would be sweet! >hint<"

 

proth5, hint taken!  I've forwarded your comments to Michael Taylor, engineer and inventor of the proofer.

 

Regarding the need to cover dough in the proofer, most of the time it isn't necessary but testing has shown a few circumstances where it is a good idea.  When proofing for extended times at temps that differ from room temp by a small margin, it's a good idea to cover the dough.  I've been working on a boule that uses a biga fermented overnight (12 hrs) at 70 or 75F, and while it doesn't form a hard skin that has to be removed, there was some drying and darkening of the surface, so the recipe, when posted on our site, will include directions to cover the biga. 

Julie

johnr55's picture
johnr55

I bought the B&T proofer from PHG and I'm loving it.  The layout of my kitchen is such that oven proofing is no longer either convenient, or even reliable.  I was delighted to buy this proofer and it's working perfectly for me; in fact, PHG asked me to write a testimonial for it.  Mind you, I'm not any kind of a pro baker, don't want to be, just wanted something to proof my dough.  And it works great for that.  There's always a compromise between size and capability.  I like the fact that the folded size and weight are very light because I'm mostly wheelchair bound.  I don't bake bread every day and I also really like being able to fold the thing up like my meat slicer.  And no, I don't consider it a toy.  It'll pay for itself with me. 

loydb's picture
loydb

Ordered, thanks for the suggestion!

 

dupont's picture
dupont

What we really need are some rectangular containers that could fit in a stack because once my big round container is in there is not much real estate for a second batch.

 

loydb's picture
loydb

I have only had mine for a couple of weeks and I love it. I'm getting much more consistent proofing, and have used it twice to melt chocolate. 

 

 

tn gabe's picture
tn gabe

It's not too hard to get everything to convert a spare fridge to a retarder/proofer complete with humidity control etc. Of course it doesn't fold up and most folks don't want multiple refrigerators. I'm in the process of converting a fridge to ferment sausage before curing and it is the same idea.