The Fresh Loaf

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What types of Ales can be used in Bread making

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usank001's picture
usank001

What types of Ales can be used in Bread making

Hi all

I have some Cask conditioned ale that is sitting around. Thought I might use it in some bread. Is this feasible or do I need bootle conditioned ale for bread ie ale/beer that contains yeast? 

Any assistance will be appreciated.

Una

 

thomaschacon75's picture
thomaschacon75

If it's just for flavouring, sure you can.

But if you're asking if you can use unpasteurized cask ale, which will have (may have?) active yeasts, to leaven bread, however, that I don't know. I rather doubt it.

usank001's picture
usank001

Thanks...I have a recipe from Dan Lepard that I wanted to try and bought the ale. Didn't know there was something called bottle conditioned. When I reread the recipe I realised my mistake so your info that I can use it just for flavouring makes sense.So that is the way I will go.

 

Porkbutter's picture
Porkbutter

You're fine. It makes no difference whatsoever how it was conditioned. As someone who is pretty fanatical about both beer making and bread making I am sure of this. 

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Una, and welcome to TFL!

I'm Northumberland-based and have been working in Newcastle upon Tyne for the last 4 years.

Regarding your question: do you intend to use your ale to create a proper barm yeast culture?

To clarify: Bottle-conditioned beer is "live" in the bottle.   So too, cask conditioned beer is also live.   So you can feed flour and water to these in order to develop a viable culture.

If your beer is pasteurised and in keg form, or not live in the bottle, or, canned...then it is no good for making a traditional barm.   You can, of course, add a small amount of baker's yeast and thus create a pre-ferment with more of a beer flavour.

You can use beer as the liquor in the final dough, of whatever type, to create bread with a bit stronger taste.   To get the full effect, a strongly-flavoured ale, or porter, or stout is probably the best type to use.

Hope this helps.

Best wishes

Andy

usank001's picture
usank001

Andy

I was looking to make a traditional barm and realised it was the wrong kind of ale. But I might try, as you suggest, adding a bit of  yeast to the mix and still use it.

At the minute I am trying a mixed grain bread so will leave that for another day.

Thanks for your help.

Una