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yeast conversion

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FONI's picture
FONI

yeast conversion

Hi members,

A question about active dry yeast.  I have a yeast which is mentioned here , that I have to dilute this dry yeast in a warm water using 1oz sugar for each 6 oz of dry yeast.

Any idea how much water I have to use?  and any conversion from 1 oz sugar equal with tsp?

 

Thank you..

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

You might try double checking those directions a little closer.

6 oz of yeast? What's the recipe?

And 1 oz of sugar is about 6 and 3/4 tsp.

FONI's picture
FONI

hi,

well actually its not on the recipe but on the package of the yeast.

the recipe itself mention to use instant yeast but i cant find it here.

perhaps any idea how to convert active dry yeast to  instant  yeast?

thx

jcking's picture
jcking

6 ounces ADY needs about 43 pounds of flour @ 66% hydration!

thomaschacon75's picture
thomaschacon75

FONI's picture
FONI

oh GOD, thx to show me those pictures.. I really dont know so much quantity of 6oz yeast :)

Thanks

Chuck's picture
Chuck

My guess is it's "dissolve" rather than "dilute". And you don't even absolutely have to do that in non-bread machine recipes (dissolving ADY is the usual practice and is usually a good idea  ...but it's not absolutely required - putting dry undissolved ADY directly into the flour etc. will probably increase the time needed for bulk rise by something like a half hour, but it will work [eventually]).

The amount of water used for the yeast isn't critical. You need enough to avoid making "yeast mud" you can't stir easily  ...but not so much the yeast gets lost so all you have is colored water. A reasonable rule of thumb is "4 times" by weight, i.e. for dissolving 8 grams yeast use about 32 grams water. What does really matter is the total amount of water in the recipe (some in the yeast, most in the "wet" ingredients).

The other thing that really matters is the temperature of the dissolving water. The water should be baby-bottle warm. Drop a bit on the inside of your wrist (where the veins are near the surface); if it feels neither not nor cold, it's right. Alternatively, use an "instant read" kitchen thermometer. Much colder than about 85F, and the yeast will be so slow about fully dissolving or "waking up" that it will appear to not get there at all. Warmer than about 120F and the yeast may start to die. A lot of home hot water heaters are set for 140F max, so what you want is less than the hottest that can ever come out of the tap.

Once in a while weird things happen with very highly chlorinated tap water killing yeast. So the safest thing (for both the yeast water and the rest of the water in the dough) may be to use bottled mineral (not distilled) water. Unless your water supplier uses chloramines rather than chlorine (about 1/5 in the U.S. do), you can alternatively either leave a pan filled with water sitting out overnight, or use a filter pitcher (not a salt-using "water softener"). Usually it's okay to just use tap water with no special treatment  ...but that once in a while problem may be a deal breaker (especially since many water suppliers are in the habit of drastically changing the amount of chlorine they use without telling you fairly frequently).

Although many older recipes treat the sugar in the yeast dissolving water as "required" or "of course", it's really "optional". You can just leave it out if you don't want any sugar in your bread. Dissolving the yeast might take 10 minutes rather than 5 to get to the "really bubbly" stage  ...but that's all.

The amount of yeast by weight should be somewhere around 1% (maybe as low as 1/4%, maybe as high as 2-1/2%) of the weight of the flour. If the amount seems to be way different from that, reread the recipe over and over until you discover what's been garbled.

FONI's picture
FONI

Oh, so I could just drop the ADY to the mixture? Im going to use the recipe for non bread machine one..

Chuck's picture
Chuck

Sorry, I fear my compulsive "say everything" response could easily be misinterpreted to mean more than was intended. It is indeed true that you can use ADY dry without dissolving it first; but that doesn't mean that in most cases doing so is a good idea. Doing so will throw off the guestimated rise times even further than they already are. Sometimes there are good reasons for using ADY dry (for example allow a little time for an "autolyse" [which shouldn't have active yeast], even though the yeast is already mixed in) and sometimes it's a matter of convenience, but doing so is probably not a good way to start out.

Although you'll see fairly consistently here on TFL the abbreviations ADY for active dry yeast and IDY for instant dry yeast, yeast terminology in the retail world is not standardized. It's fairly likely that your market already carries instant yeast, but it's labelled "bread machine yeast". Confusing, huh?

The sugar (if you use it at all) is just food for the yeast. You need enough the yeasties can find it readily, but not so much you've got sugar-water rather than yeast-water  ...but the exact amount doesn't really matter. The ratio suggested on the package of 6 parts yeast and 1 part sugar sounds reasonable. Measure the yeast in your measuring spoons; if it's 1-1/2 teaspoons yeast, use about 1/4 teaspoon sugar (to all you purists: I know this is ridiculously oversimplified, not even mentioning volume vs. weight, different densities, etc.  ...all I'm saying is that it should work).

FONI's picture
FONI

HI Chuck, thx for the explanation... Ill try .

jcking's picture
jcking

 1 tsp instant = 1.3 tsp active dry

FONI's picture
FONI

1 tsp intant equal 1/3 tsp active dry?sorry  im a bit confious..

jcking's picture
jcking

One Point Three

Jim